Wednesday, November 30, 2016

House Rules - Heavy Weapons

Heavy Weapons

Old Damage (Each Die)New Damage
1
1d2
1d2
1d3
1d3
1d4
1d4
1d6
1d6
1d8
1d8 or 1d10
2d6
1d12
2d8
Heavy weapons, such as those made from gold or platinum, are unwieldy, but inflict additional damage. Without the proper Exotic Weapon Proficiency feat (for example, heavy longsword), you suffer a -4 penalty on attack rolls with a heavy weapon. Only weapons made entirely or largely of metal (such as swords or axes) are affected. Other weapons (such as spears) are not.

Weapons made of a heavy metal inflict increased damage as shown on the table to the right.

A character can wield a heavy weapon one size category smaller than his own in two hands to avoid the attack penalty. For instance, a human wielding a light mace made of gold with both hands, or an ogre wielding a platinum longsword with two hands, does not suffer the attack penalty.

You can never use the Weapon Finesse feat with a weapon made of a heavy metal.

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House Rules - Special Materials

Special Materials
In addition to magic items created with spells, some substances have innate special properties. The special powers of these materials are nonmagical, and thus continue to function even in an area where magic does not. Any resistance effects granted by these materials does not stack with similar effects. Any item fashioned from one of the materials listed here is treated as a masterwork item, except the extra cost is as listed for the material. The masterwork quality does not affect the enhancement bonus of weapons or the armor check penalty of armor. The market price modifier always refers to the weight of the normal (steel) object, not the object's weight in the unusual metal. If you make a suit of armor or weapon out of more than one special material, you get the benefit of only the most prevalent material. However, you can build a double weapon with each head made of a different special material.

Each of the special materials described below has a definite game effect. Some creatures have damage reduction based on their creature type or core concept. Some are resistant to all but a special type of damage, such as that dealt by evil-aligned weapons or bludgeoning weapons. Others are vulnerable to weapons of a particular material. Characters may choose to carry several different types of weapons, depending upon the campaign and types of creatures they most commonly encounter.

Type of ItemEnhancement BonusMarket Price Modifier
Light armor
DR 1/-
+5,000 shillings
Medium armor
DR 2/-
+10,000 shillings
Heavy armor
DR 3/-
+15,000 shillings
Shield
+1
+2,000 shillings
Ammunition
+1
+60 shillings
Weapon, damage up to 1d6
+1
+3,000 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d8 or higher
+2
+9,000 shillings
Adamantine: This ultrahard metal adds to the quality of a weapon or suit of armor. Weapons fashioned from adamantine have a natural enhancement bonus on attacks and damage, as listed below, and the ability to bypass hardness when sundering weapons or attacking objects, ignoring hardness less than 20. These bonuses do not stack with any other enhancement bonuses. Adamantine is so costly that weapons and armor made from it are always of masterwork quality; the masterwork cost is included in the prices given below. Armor made from adamantine grants its wearer damage reduction, and the armor check penalty of adamantine armor is lessened by 1 compared to ordinary armor of its type. Items without metal parts cannot be made from adamantine. An arrow could be made of adamantine, but a quarterstaff could not.

Only weapons, armor, and shields normally made of metal can be fashioned from adamantine. Weapons, armor and shields normally made of steel that are made of adamantine have one-third more hit points than normal. Adamantine weighs the same as steel, has hardness 20, and 40 hit points per inch of thickness.

Type of Alchemical Silver ItemMarket Price Modifier
Ammunition
+2 shillings
Small weapon
+20 shillings
Medium weapon, or one head of a double weapon
+90 shillings
Large weapon or both heads of a double weapon
+180 shillings
Alchemical Silver: A complex process involving metallurgy and alchemy can bond silver to a weapon made of steel so that it bypasses the damage reduction of creatures such as lycanthropes. On a successful attack with a silvered weapon, the wielder takes a -1 penalty on the damage roll (with the usual minimum of 1 point of damage). The alchemical silvering process can’t be applied to nonmetal items, and it doesn’t work on rare metals such as adamantine, cold iron, and mithral. Alchemical silver weighs the same as steel, has 10 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 8.

Cold Iron: This iron, mined deep underground and known for its effectiveness against fey creatures, is forged at a lower temperature to preserve its delicate properties. Weapons made of cold iron cost twice as much to make as their normal counterparts. Also, any magical enhancements cost an additional 2,000 shillings.

Items without metal parts cannot be made from cold iron. An arrow could be made of cold iron, but a quarterstaff could not. A double weapon that has only half of it made of cold iron increases its cost by 50%. Cold iron has 30 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 10.

Darkwood: This rare magic wood is as hard as normal wood but very light. Any wooden or mostly wooden item (such as a bow, an arrow, or a spear) made from darkwood is considered a masterwork item and weighs only half as much as a normal wooden item of that type. Items not normally made of wood or only partially of wood (such as a battleaxe or a mace) either cannot be made from darkwood or do not gain any special benefit from being made of darkwood. The armor check penalty of a darkwood shield is lessened by 2 compared to an ordinary shield of its type. To determine the price of a darkwood item, use the original weight but add 10 shillings per pound to the price of a masterwork version of that item. Darkwood has 10 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 5.

Dragonhide: Armorsmiths can work with the hides of dragons to produce armor or shields of masterwork quality. One dragon produces enough hide for a single suit of masterwork hide armor for a creature one size category smaller than the dragon. By selecting only choice scales and bits of hide, an armorsmith can produce one suit of masterwork banded mail for a creature two sizes smaller, one suit of masterwork half-plate for a creature three sizes smaller, or one masterwork breastplate or suit of full plate for a creature four sizes smaller. In each case, enough hide is available to produce a small or large masterwork shield in addition to the armor, provided that the dragon is Large or larger.

Because dragonhide armor isn’t made of metal, druids can wear it without penalty. Dragonhide armor costs double what masterwork armor of that type ordinarily costs, but it takes no longer to make than ordinary armor of that type. Dragonhide has hardness 10 and 10 hit points per inch of thickness.

Düsterstählern: An alloy made using rare iron deposits found mostly in the deep mines of Steinigreich, düsterstählern, also known as darksteel, is silvery in hue when polished or cut, but its exposed surfaces have a deep, gleaming purple luster. The process for making this type of steel was once lost, but was recently rediscovered thanks to some ancient dwarven texts. The alloy is made from a specific type of iron tempered with a variety of special oils.

Armor made from düsterstählern grants acid resistance 2. Weapons forged from düsterstählern inflict +1 point of electricity damage each time they hit (this is cumulative with other abilities, such as shocking or shocking burst. Items not primarily made of metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Düsterstählern weighs the same as steel, has hardness 10, and had 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,500 shillings.

Fever Iron: In some volcanic craters, pools of molten metal collect and are never allowed to fully cool. Sometimes these pools of semisolid metal attract raw magical energy and are transformed into what the dwarves call fever iron. Perhaps because of its proximity to Menaevia and Yle, such deposit seem to be most often found in Aidaföd. Fever iron can be made fully solid through a magical process that includes application of intense cold, after which it can be worked like normal iron.

Armor made from fever iron grants fire resistance 2. Weapons forged of fever iron inflict +1 point of fire damage each time they hit (this is cumulative with other abilities, such as flaming or flaming burst). Items not primarily made of metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Fever iron can never be used in a magic item that uses cold effects, such as a frost or icy burst weapon. Fever iron weighs the same as steel, has hardness 12, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,500 shillings.

Fíocopar: Copper is known to spellcasters as a magical purifier, aiding in magic that negates sickness and poison, as well as being an excellent conductor for electrical effects. While its brilliant color makes it popular for ornamental items, its relative softness makes it unsuitable for armor or weapons unless magic is used to extract the metaphysically pure form of copper, the true essence of copper in material form also known as fíocopar or truecopper.

Armor made from fíocopar grants cold resistance 2. Items not primarily made from metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail is affected, while a suit of studded leather is not). Fíocopar is favored by alvari for making weapons with the shocking or shocking burst properties.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings.

Géaradh: Géaradh is a rare natural metal usually found as streaks of blue-green ore amid vitreous glass. When refined and forged, the metal is silver-blue with a green reflective shine. The metal is famous for holding a sharp edge even when abused, and is the favored material for making keen weapons.

Armor made from géaradh grants sonic resistance 2. Items not primarily made of metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail is affected, while a suit of studded leather is not). Géaradh weighs the same as steel, has hardness 12, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings.

Type of Gold ItemMarket Price Modifier
Armor
+5,000 shillings
Weapon, damage up to 1d3
+1,500 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d4 or 1d6
+2,500 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d8 or higher
+7,000 shillings
Gold: While most use gold as currency, spellcasters know of gold's magical properties. When magically refined and treated, gold can be made hard as steel. The following information refers to magically treated gold.

Armor made from treated gold grants acid and fire resistance 2. Gold armors are one category heavier than normal for purposes of movement and other limitations (for example, whether a barbarian can use her fast movement ability while wearing the armor). Light armors are treated as medium, and medium and heavy armors are treated as heavy. Spell failure chances for armor and shields made of gold are increased by 10%, Maximum Dexterity bonus is decreased by 2 (which may bring it below 0), and armor check penalties are increased by 3.

Gold weapons are considered heavy weapons (see the post on Heavy Weapons). Items not primarily made from metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Magically treated gold weighs twice as much as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Gyad'r hywr Wood: Found deep in the great Llwyd Uchel Forest, the Gyad'r hywr trees are named for the eerie appearance of their tightly growing groves. Smooth, with small branches at the top of their up to 60-foot trunks, Gyad'r hywr trees have black bark and smoky gray wood that is as touch as iron.

Any steel or mostly steel weapon (such as a sword or a mace) made from gyad'r hywr wood is considered a masterwork item and weighs only half as much as a normal steel item of that type. Weapons not normally made of steel or only partially of steel (such as a club or battleaxe) either cannot be made from gyad'r hwyr wood or do not gain any special benefit or penalty from being made of gyad'r hwyr wood. If a weapon made from gyad'r hywr wood weighs less than a short sword (for a Medium creature) or a dagger (for a Small creature), that weapon can be treated as a light weapon.

Gyad'r hywr wood doesn't work well as armor; it cannot be shaped into rings like steel, and overlapping plates to not flex well. (Even the wood shape spell cannot create the level of detail needed). However, gyad'r hwyr wood breastplates are possible with the following statistics: Armor bonus +5, maximum Dexterity bonus +4, armor check penalty -2, and arcane spell failure 20%. A gyad'r hwr breastplate is considered light armor for the purposes of movement and other limitations. Gyad'r hwyr wood weighs half as much as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Weapon +1,500 shillings; breastplate +3,000 shillings.

Istål: This bone-white metal, sometimes known as icesteel, can take a high polish and is often mistaken for ivory when seen in finished items, but has a distinctive greenish sheen in candlelight. Istål ore is found in the clay dug from riverbanks in the Dekkulde Islands, and when refined it is soft and easily carved. A second heating makes it hard and durable. This property makes the metal ideal for decorative work and figurines.

Armor made from istål grants fire resistance 2. Weapons forged from the metal inflict +1 point of frost damage each time they hit (this is cumulative with other abilities, such as frost or icy burst). Items not primarily made from metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Istål can never be used in a magic item that uses fire effects, such as a flaming or flaming burst weapon. Istål weighs the same as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,500 shillings.

Liekkiteräs: This rare pale silvery gray metal is found only in scattered, but very rich deposits under mountains deep within the Hallitsijainen Empire as a softy, greenish-gray claylike ore or a flaky mud. One misstep in its refining and it remains useless mud.

Armor made from liekkiteräs grants cold resistance 2. Weapons forged of leikkiteräs inflict +1 point of electricity damage and +1 point of fire damage each time they hit (this is cumulative with other abilities). Items not primarily made of metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Leikkiteräs can never be used in a magic item that uses cold effects, such as frost or icy burst weapons. Leikkiteräs weighs the same as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,500 shillings.

Type of Living Metal ItemMarket Price Modifier
Light armor
+700 shillings
Medium armor
+2,000 shillings
Heavy armor
+4,500 shillings
Other items
+100 shillings per pound
Living Metal: Powerful sources of life energy, such as druid circles or sites holy to Eiur, somtimes leach energy into the soil, which changes the properties of any natural deposits of iron buried nearby. This living metal usually has a light gray-green color and has properties of natural repair and reshaping. It is favored in the construction of rings of regeneration.

Over time, armor made of living metal naturally shapes itself to fit its wearer. After ten days of regular wearing, increase the maximum Dexterity bonus by 1,reduce the armor check penalty by 1, and reduce the arcane spell failure chance by 5% for living metal armor. Armor not primarily made of metal is not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail is affected, while a suit of studded leather is not).

In addition, an item made of living metal naturally repairs damage to itself, healing 1 hit point per minute. It cannot repair itself if brought to 0 hit points or destroyed (such as through disintegration). Living metal weighs the same as steel, has hardness 12, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Type of Mithral ItemMarket Price Modifier
Light armor
+1,000 shillings
Medium armor
+4,000 shillings
Heavy armor
+9,000 shillings
Shield
+1,000 shillings
Other items
+500 shillings per pound
Mithral: Mithral is a very rare silvery, glistening metal that is lighter than iron but just as hard. When worked like steel, it becomes a wonderful material from which to create armor and is occasionally used for other items as well. Most mithral armors are one category lighter than normal for purposes of movement and other limitations. Heavy armors are treated as medium, and medium armors are treated as light, but light armors are still treated as light. Spell failure chances for armors and shields made from mithral are decreased by 10%, maximum Dexterity bonus is increased by 2, and armor check penalties are lessened by 3 (to a minimum of 0).

An item made from mithral weighs half as much as the same item made from other metals. In the case of weapons, this lighter weight does not change a weapon’s size category. If a weapon made from mithril weighs less than a short sword (for a Medium creature) or a dagger (for a Small creature), that weapon can be treated as a light weapon. Items not primarily of metal are not meaningfully affected by being partially made of mithral. (A longsword can be a mithral weapon, while a scythe cannot be). Any damage resistance that can be overcome by a silver weapon can also be overcome by a mithral weapon.

Weapons or armors fashioned from mithral are always masterwork items as well; the masterwork cost is included in the prices given below. Mithral weighs half as much as steel, has hardness 15, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Type of Platinum ItemMarket Price Modifier
Armor
+5,000 shillings
Weapon, damage up to 1d3
+1,500 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d4 or 1d6
+2,500 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d8 or higher
+7,000 shillings
Platinum: This silvery-white metal superficially resembles aluminum but is extremely heavy. Because it is so malleable, it must be magically altered to the rigidity of steel so it can maintain its shape even when used in combat. This process also catalyzes its magical properties. The following information refers to magically treated platinum.

Armor made from treated platinum grants cold and sonic resistance 2. Platinum armors are one category heavier than normal for purposes of movement and other limitations (for example, whether a barbarian can use her fast movement ability while wearing the armor). Light armors are treated as medium, and medium and heavy armors are treated as heavy. Spell failure chances for armor and shields made of platinum are increased by 10%, Maximum Dexterity bonus is decreased by 2 (which may bring it below 0), and armor check penalties are increased by 3.

Platinum weapons are considered heavy weapons (see the post on Heavy Weapons). Items not primarily made from metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Magically treated platinum weighs twice as much as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Silver: Long valued for its purity and beauty, silver is also used to make weapons and armor. Irt is commonly used to in items involving magic dedicated to Vali or Füllar, as well as bane weapons dedicated to battling shapechangers. With the proper magical treatments, silver gains the rigidity of steel. The following information refers to magically treated silver.

Armor made from silver grants electricity resistance 2. Weapons forged of treated silver can damage creatures whose damage reduction type is silver, and they deal +1 damage to such creatures. Items whose striking point or surface is not primarily metal are not meaningfully affected. (A longsword or a spear is affected, while a club is not). Magically treated silver weights as much as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,000 shillings.

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House Rules - Expendable Foci

Expendable Foci (from Path of Magic)

Power is the currency of magic. Even the greatest of wizards runs out of it eventually, leaving him unable to toss even the simplest of spells. While scrolls, potions, rings, and wands are all a great help, very few of them are able to assist the mage with what can be one of the greatest drains upon his magical energy - metamagic.

While metamagic is highly useful, it can also cut deeply into a spellcaster's available spell slots. Is it worth maximizing fireball if it reduces your overall number of spells? For wizards, more than sorcerers, the dilemma lies in preparation. Without knowing the dangers he is going to face in a given day, a wizard may hamstring himself by relying too heavily on metamagic and restricting the range of spells available for his use. The sorcerer is not out of the woods, either, because metamagic increases the casting time of his spells, preventing their use when the caster is pressed for time.

The expendable focus is the answer to these problems. Charged with magical energy, it can be used to release that energy to power metamagic. By relieving the drain on a spellcaster's personal energies, the focus allows the spellcaster to use whenever it is needed, without depleting his spell slots.

In this post, a system for creating these expendable foci is presented, along with information on their use.

Focus Types
There are four types of foci: Rings, talismans, potions, and culinary ashe. Rings are by far the most flexible type. A ring contains only generic energy which can be used to fuel a variety of different metamagic applications. Talismans are more restricted, as their energy is focused to provide only a single type of benefit. Potions and culinary ashe are even more inflexible, as the energy they contain may only be used for a single purpose and each potion or culinary ashe can only be used a single time.

Using a Focus
A focus is, in the most general terms, a receptacle of magical energy. Using a focus is a simple matter of releasing the energy it contains, then harnessing that energy for use in spellcasting. When handled properly, this energy is used to power metamagic feats, relieving the spellcaster from the need to expend spell slots for these augmented powers. Unfortunately, using an expendable focus is not always a sure thing and can lead to some unexpected results for the careless or novice user.

Using a Ring
In order to use the energy contained within an expendable focus ring, it must be worn while the command word is spoken. activating a ring focus is a standard action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity. The energy, once released, must be used to augment a spell cast in the next round in order to avoid losing the power and possibly starting a manafire (see below). A ring may be used until the energy it contains is completely expended, at which point the ring crumbles to dust immediately.

Using a Talisman
The talisman is a simple magical item, typically worn on a chain around the caster's neck. The talisman is activated by wearing it and speaking a command word. Activating a talisman is a standard action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity. as with a ring, the energy released from a talisman must be used during the following round to augment a spell in order to avoid losing the energy and starting a manafire. A talisman can only be used until the energy it contains is completely expended, at which point it crumbles to dust immediately.

Using a Potion or Culinary Ashe
The expendable focus potions or culinary ashe are good only for a single use - drinking them is a standard action that provokes an attack of opportunity. Once the potion is imbibed, the caster must use the energy released to augment a spell in the following round. Failure to release this energy may cause serious energy to the individual who consumed the potion or culinary ashe.

Using Multiple Expendable Foci
Because each focus can only contain a certain amount of magical energy, there are times when it is beneficial to release power from more than one item. The limitation is the time factor - releasing energy from a focus is a standard action, which severely limits the number of levels that can be released each round.

As long as the caster is able to control the power he releases (see Manafire, below), there is no limit to the number of foci from which he may draw power. as more energy is released, more time passes, and the power becomes increasingly dangerous.

Magical Energy
The benefit of an expendable focus is the nature of the energy it contains. Unlike a scroll, potion, or most other magic items, the expendable focus is a simple repository for magical energy. This energy is measured in levels, and the number of levels of energy contained within an expendable focus determines its usefulness.

When the energy is released from an expendable focus, it is immediately available for use by the creature that releases it. The energy can only be used to power a metamagic enhancement that the creature that released it is applying to a spell or spell-like ability.

For every level by which a metamagic enhancement raises the spell slot of a spell, the spellcaster requires a level of power from the expendable focus. This is modified by the lvele of the spell being cast: Add one-half the spell's level, rounded down, to the above amount to determine the number of levels that must be extracted from the expendable focus. Because this energy is released before the spell is cast, the level of the spell is always its base level, not its level modified by metamagic such as Heighten Spell.

As an example, a spellcaster that wishes to use the Enlarge Spell feat (which increases the required spell slot level for the spell by one) on a fireball (a 3rd-level spell). The caster would have to draw one spell level from the focus to pay for the Enlarge Spell effect, and one spell level for fireball's level (one-half of three, rounded down). To successfully cast the enlarged fireball, then, the caster must withdraw two levels of energy from his expendable focus.

Manafire
When energy is released from an expendable focus, it suffuses the air around the caster (or the caster herself in the case of a potion or culinary ashe) with magical energy. This power is very unstable and, unless used quickly, has the potential to react violently with the mundane atmosphere. Such unfortunate happenings are dubbed manafire, and are often quite deadly.

Whenever energy is released from an expendable focus, it must be used to provide the power for a metamagic enhancement before the end of the next round. If it is not used, the spellcaster must attempt to retain control over the power so that it does not erupt into a burst of manafire. This requires a Concentration check of DC 10 + (1 per level of energy released x 1 per round since the energy was released), which may be performed as a free action. If the check is successful, the energy remains around (or within) the caster, a volatile mix of power just waiting to explode.

If the caster adds more energy to the previously released power, only one Concentration check is made each round - the DC is based on the total number of levels currently awaiting use and the total number of rounds since the first energy was released. While it is possible to release a considerable amount of energy using multiple foci, doing so is only for the skilled or foolhardy. Characters with inadequate Concentration skill will find themselves failing rather quickly, and then find themselves at the mercy of manafire.

When a Concentration check fails, the result is a blast of manafire that roars through the caster. The spellcaster must immediately make a Will save (DC 15 + 1 for every level of energy released but not used) when manafire erupts. If this save fails, the spellcaster suffers one hit point of damage per level of energy released but not used, and is stunned for 1d4 rounds from the disorienting rush of exploding power.

If the manafire is caused, even if only in part, by spell levels released from the drinking of one or more potions or the consumption of one or more culinary ashe, the damage is much more severe. If the Will save (DC as above) is failed, the spellcaster immediately suffers 1d4 hit points of damage per energy level released but not used and is stunned for 1d6 rounds.

Casters who fall unconscious as a result of manafire damage lose all spellcasting ability for the day, just as if they had expended all of their available spell slots or prepared spells.

Creating an Expendable Focus
An expendable focus is much simpler to create than a standard magic item. It does not create an effect, but simply stores energy that can be used by spellcasters in very specific ways. Unlike a magical sword of suit of armor, the expendable focus can be created with few tools and requires more time and effort than material components.

These items can be created with equipment no more sophisticated than a small fire, and the ingredients and materials required are quire common and available in any town with more than 1,000 or so inhabitants. The creator will benefit from more refined surroundings: If the focus is created in a laboratory, the crafter will gain a +2 circumstance bonus to all rolls made while creating an expendable focus.

Note: The item creation feats Economical Charge and Focus Mastery, although not required for crafting expendable foci, do make crafting such items easier and less expensive.

Creating an Expendable Ring Focus
As the most flexible type of expendable focus, rings require more preparation time and a greater investment of materials than the other types. To create an expendable ring focus, the crafter must have the Forge Ring feat and must follow the steps below.

# of LevelsRequired Value
110
240
390
4160
5250
6360
7490
8640
9810
101,000
# of Enabled FeatsValue Multiplier
1x1
2x1.5
3x2
4x2.5
Acquire the Ring: The value of the ring is crucial to the overall capacity of the focus it becomes. Use the following charts to determine how valuable the ring must be in order to contain the desired magical energies. Any attempt to store more energy in a ring than its value allows automatically fails.

Note that the value of the ring is first calculated based on the levels of energy it can hold,. The value of the ring is then multiplied based on the number of different metamagic applications the ring can be used to power. The more versatile the expendable focus is, the more expensive it is to create. The spellcaster creating the ring must be able to use the metamagic enhancement he wishes to enable the ring to power. Without the knowledge of how the metamagic works, the creator cannot create a focus to fuel it.

The actual composition of the ring is unimportant. A plain copper ring is often used for a small expendable focus, while gem encrusted rings of gold are common for the most powerful expendable foci.

Treat the Ring: Before a ring can absorb magical energies, the spellcaster must treat the item with his own life energy, with many creators using their own blood for this process. This process binds the focus to its creator. For every level of energy contained within the focus, the spellcaster must sacrifice one hit point. This hit point will not heal until the ring focus is destroyed, as it is necessary to contain the magical energy within the ring. The process of treating the ring requires one hour per hit point sacrificed, and always succeeds.

Charge the Ring: After a ring is treated, it is ready to accept the magical energy it is going to store. A treated ring will remain ready to accept energy for a year and a day after it is treated. If it is not charged within that time, it becomes nothing more than a normal ring and the hit points sacrificed by its creator begin to heal as normal.

Charging the ring requires a variable amount of time to complete, based in part on the number of levels to be stored and in part on the skill of the creator. The creator focuises his mental energies on the ring, striving to infuse it with a fraction of his own power. The process is not without danger, however, nor is success guaranteed.

Once the spellcaster begins the process of charging the ring, he must push through to the end. At the end of every hour of the process, the creator must make a DC 20 Spellcraft check. If he succeeds, one level of magical energy is stored within the focus.

The spellcaster may continue this process for up to eight hours without penalty. For every additional hour, however, the DC of the spellcraft check increases by one. If the creator fails three of these checks in a row, the process ends as he collapses into an exhausted stupor. Spellcasters who exhaust themselves in this way are considered stunned for a full 24 hours, after which they are able to resume activity as normal.

Whenever a spellcaster stops the charging process, either voluntarily of because he collapses from the strain, the focus is considered complete.

Creating an Expendable Talisman Focus
# of LevelsRequired Value
120
240
360
480
5100
6120
7140
8160
9180
10200
To create an expendable talisman focus, the crafter must have the Craft Wondrous Item feat. The steps for crafting a talisman are the same as for crafting a ring, with the following exceptions:

The talisman used to create the focus must have a value based on the number of levels of energy it can contain, as shown in the chart to the right.

A talisman can only fuel one metamagic power, decided upon at the time of its creation. The talisman's creator must be able to use the metamagic ability at the time the talisman is created.

The time required to treat the talisman is equal to one hour for every two levels of stored energy.

Creating an Expendable Potion or Culinary Ashe Focus
Potions and culinary ashe are the lest expensive, easiest to create foci, because they are so limited in scope. The creator must have the Brew Potion or Culinary Ashe feat. Creating an expendable potion or culinary ashe focus works the same as creating an expendable ring focus, with the following exceptions:
  • The raw materials needed for creating this type of focus is readily available - it is the spellcaster's blood that provides the magical spark necessary to store the energy within the potion. The materials do have a cost, however, and a crafter must spend 10 shillings per level of energy the potion or culinary ashe will contain to acquire these components.

  • A potion or culinary ashe can only fuel one metamagic enhancement, decided upon at the time of its creation. The creator must be able to use the metamagic at the time the potion or culinary ashe is created. In addition, the potion or culinary ashe may only hold enough energy to fuel the chosen feat a single time. Because the amount of energy required to power a metamagic effect is partly dependent upon the level of the spell the feat affects, the creator must determine at the time the potion or culinary ashe is made what level of spells it will be used to augment

    The potion or culinary ashe can then only be used to augment spells of that level. If it is consumed when the spellcaster has no spells of the proper level or higher available, the potion immediately erupts into manafire, as detailed above. The spellcaster is still allowed the Will save to prevent the damage to himself, but is not allowed a Concentration check to attempt to contains the blaze.

  • The time needed to treat the potion is equal to one hour for every three levels of stored energy.
Creating an Expendable Focus That Can Be Used by Others
In general, an expendable focus is only useful for the mage that creates it. Other casters cannot release the energy it contains unless special measures are taken.

The creator of an expendable focus can, at the time the item is created, spend a few more gold (and some experience) in lieu of using his own life force to power the focus. The following changes are necessary to create an expendable focus that can be used by another spellcaster:
  • The cost of the focus it tripled, as more exotic materials and more elaborate preparations are required.

  • The focus must be created in a magical workshop. While a normal expendable focus can be created with nothing more than a fire and a handful of easily obtainable items, an expendable focus that can be used by others requires a great deal more care to create.

  • Instead of sacrificing his blood, the creator must instead sacrifice 50 experience points for every level of energy contained within the focus.
Other than the above changes, the process for creating an expendable focus useful to all casters is the same as the process for creating a normal expendable focus. Note that even though the creator of an expendable focus may have the ability to use the relevant metamagic abilities, the user of the expendable focus must also have that same ability to use the relevant metamagic ability to be able to gain the benefit of the power of the focus. If a spellcaster without the relevant ability attempts to use an expendable focus, it will immediately erupt into manafire, as detailed above. The spellcaster is still allowed the Will save to prevent the damage to himself, but is not allowed a Concentration check to attempt to contains the blaze.

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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

House Rules - Eldritch Staves

Eldritch Staves (from Path of Magic)
An eldritch staff is not merely another magic item. While a sorcerer or wizard can go through dozens of wands and simple magic staves in his career, he will never have more than a single eldritch staff. This staff is a powerful item, a creation that reflects the power and spirit of the mage who crafts it. While other magic items remain the same throughout their existence, the eldritch staff grows along with its master, maturing with him so that its utility is not diminished. At the end of its career, the staff if a powerful and crucial part of the mage.

While the eldritch staff provides powerful enhancements to a spellcaster's abilities, it does so at a cost. As specific types of power are channeled through the staff, they create paths that grow easier and easier to tap into with each use. But other path, used less frequently, grow stiff and inflexible, and the spellcaster may eventually find them closed to him. As with many things in the magical arts, all things carry a price. As a spellcaster goes through the steps of creating his eldritch staff, he must be mindful of how the staff will aid him - and how it will hinder him - in the future.

Finding an Eldritch Staff
The eldritch staff like a spellcaster, begins life quite humbly. Whether a sapling, a branch from a larger tree, an unworked ingot, an ivory tusk, a length of bone, or even a piece of driftwood or scrap iron, all eldritch staves begin their life as a simple piece of lumber, ivory, bone, or metal. Each mage knows his staff from the first moment he sees it, even before it is carved, polished, or worked in any way. The spellcaster simply understands, as if he has seen a piece of his soul reflected in the raw materials. Some mages discover their staff before they have even truly begun their training. Others go through years of their career before stumbling across just the right piece to match their skills and temperament.

In order to find the materials for his eldritch staff, the spellcaster must first possess the Craft Eldritch Staff item creation feat. If this feat is taken at 1st level, the spellcaster may begin play with the raw materials for his staff and may begin crafting it immediately, if he so desires. When taken later in play, this feat represents the location and harvesting of the necessary raw materials by the spellcaster.

Crafting an Eldritch Staff
Once the raw materials from which the staff will be created are found, the spellcaster may begin work on the item. This process is relatively simple, but grows more complex the later in his career a spellcaster attempts to craft his staff. A neophyte wizard will find it a much simpler process to create his staff than will an archmage, if only because the neophyte has much less power available for investing in the staff.

The Investiture
The first step in creating the staff is known as the Investiture. The spellcaster must devote a portion of himself to the staff in order to bind it to his spirit and allow him to draw upon its powers. This binding takes the form of a single point of Constitution, a wound that never quite heals and that ties the eldritch staff and the spellcaster together. This Constitution point is gone forever and is not regained even if the staff is destroyed. The exact ceremony involved in the Investiture varies from spellcaster to spellcaster, as befits such an intensely personal experience.

When the Investiture is complete, the spellcaster has the first component of an eldritch staff. At this point it is simply a piece of wood, metal, bone, or ivory attuned to his spirit, but with a little work, its true power begins to shine through.

The Crafting
Once a staff has gone through the Investiture, it is ready to be transformed into an item of power. The spellcaster must craft the form of the staff with his hands, using the feel of the magic within it to reveal its true shape. In most cases, the staff resembles its caster in size and shape. All eldritch staves are roughly the same height as their creator, and their bulk and shape are also proportionally close matches for the body of the spellcaster who creates them. If a character with no magical training knew a wizard or sorcerer, he could easily pick that spell caster's staff out from a collection by its appearance alone.

To craft the staff, the spellcaster must be alone with the Invested raw materials for a full twenty-four hours. At the end of that time, the spellcaster makes a single Spellcraft check (DC 10 + the level of the spellcaster). If the spellcaster has at least five ranks of the Craft: Woodworking skill, he receives a +2 synergy bonus to this check.

If this check succeeds, the spellcaster has seen the true shape of the wood, metal, bone, or ivory, and it able to let the magic guide the blade across the wood, use the chisel to pound out the course details, or forge the metal into shape. It requires an additional day per level of the spellcaster to complete the project. During each day, the spellcaster is required to spend at least eight hours working on the staff without interruption or undertaking any other strenuous activity. If the spellcaster is interrupted for more than a few minutes, the day does not count towards the time needed to craft the staff.

If the Spellcraft check fails, the spellcaster must put the raw materials away and wait until he has achieved another level before he may attempt to craft the staff again. After the crafting is complete, the spellcaster is ready to move on to the next step: Designing the arcane matrix to provide the true power of the staff.

The Arcane Matrix
Element Configuration DC
Spellcaster Level 1DCConfigured Elements 2DC Modifier
1130-
2141+1
4152+2
6173+3
8184+5
10195+6
12216+7
14237+9
16258+10
18279+11
2030--
1 The creator's current spell level.
2 The number of elements currently configured in the staff. Add the corresponding DC Modifier to the DC determined by the spellcaster's level to determine the final DC of the Spellcraft check for configuring an element.
The power of an eldritch staff lies in its arcane matrix, the unique focus of elements through which magic flows. When directed by the will of the spellcaster, this matrix provides a magnifying conduit for certain magical elements; it also restricts the flow of energy for others. While one eldritch staff may increase the range of of a spell but decrease its damage at the same time, another staff may do the exactly the opposite, magnifying the effect of a spell while limiting its range. While one or more elements for a matrix are defined at the time of its creation, others are only discovered with the passage of time as the staff and its creator both increase in power.

During this phase of the staff's creation, the creator determines the number of components that make up the original matrix. For every two spellcaster levels (or at 1st level, if the staff is created at this time), the creator is able to configure one element in the matrix. At every even level thereafter, an additional element may be configured, provided the spellcaster is able and willing to fuel the configuration process.

To configure an element, the spellcaster simply selects one and makes a Spellcraft check with the DC determined by the table to the right. If the check succeeds, the caster must pay ten times the final Spellcraft DC in experience in order to complete the configuration. If the Spellcraft check fails, or if the spellcaster chooses not to configure an element when he is given the chance, that slot for the matrix becomes a null, and interstice of the matrix that may never be filled by an element. While it is possible for a staff to have ten elements in its matrix, it is much more common for this number to be considerably lower due to failed configuration attempts.

The Elements
The order in which elements are selected for configuration is irrelevant - the point at which an element is selected determines both its overall utility as well as the restrictions it applies as thr staff matures. Since some of the benefits and penalties for an element scale with the addition of new elements into the matrix, the creator must always be prepared to pay the price for power - nothing comes for free.

The following list details some of the elements that are available for spellcasters to configure into their eldritch staff. Other elements may be added to this list in the future.

Arcane Impact
   Benefit: Whenever the wielder of the staff casts a spell, he can choose to charge the staff with its energy rather than releasing the spell immediately. If the wielder then makes a successful melee attack with the staff against any target, the spell is discharged into the target. In addition, all variable numeric elements of the staff (other than range) are Maximized. A staff can hold a charge for a maximum number of rounds equal to twice the spellcaster's level, after which time it dissipates normally.
   Drawback: When the element is configured in the staff's matrix, the staff's owner must choose a spell slot of the highest level spells that he wishes to use with this ability. This spell slot must be of a level that the creator can currently cast. That spell slot is irrevocably lost.

Arcane Power
   Benefit: Pick a single school of magic. Any random numerical element of a spell from that school (such as the number of monsters summoned by a summon monster spell) cast while wielding the staff is increased by a number equal to the current number of elements configured in the staff.
   Drawback: All random, numerical elements of any spell cast from any other school of magic are reduced by a number equal to the current number of elements configured in the staff (to a minimum of one).

Blowthrough
   Benefit: If a spell cast by the wielder of the staff kills one or more of its targets, it immediately causes an additional 1d4 points of damage to a single target within 20 feet pf any target killed by the spell. The caster chooses this target, which must be within range of the original spell and gets a save as if he were the original target. This damage increases by one point for every additional element configured within the staff. Each time an additional element is configured, then spellcaster must select one school of magic. spells cast from those schools do not receive this bonus.
   Drawback: The spellcaster must choose one of the following schools from which he can cast spells: Conjuration, Enchantment, or Illusion. He casts all spells from that school at -1 caster level.

Calling Stick
   Benefit: Any summon monster, summon nature's ally, or summon undead spell cast while wielding the staff receives the following benefits:
  • When a random number of creatures are summoned, one additional monster of the same type answers the call.
  • The duration of the summons is increased by one round per configured element.
  • All summoned creatures receive a +1 morale bonus to attack rolls and saving throws for the duration of the spell.
   Drawback: When this element is configured, the spellcaster must choose one spell from his spell book or one spell that he knows. This spell becomes incomprehensible to him forever - it may not be prepared, cast, cast from a spell-completion item, or even used from within a spell-trigger item.

Concentration Stabilizer
   Benefit: The character gains a +1 circumstance bonus per configured element to all Concentration checks while she is holding the staff.
   Drawback: From the time this element is configured, the character suffers a -2 penalty on all Spellcraft checks.

Deflect Spell
   Benefit: When wielding the staff, the creator gains a +2 bonus to all saves against spells of any type. This bonus is not provided when the caster is caught in the area of effect of a spell or when the caster is not the primary target of the spell.
   Drawback: When this element is configured, the creator of the staff must select a school of magic that he can cast from the following list: Enchantment, Evocation, or Transmutation. The save DC of spells cast from the chosen school is reduced by 2.

Eldritch Reach
   Benefit: When this element, and each additional element, is configured, the range of all spells cast while wielding the staff is increased. This does not affect spells with a range of touch, self, or an area defined in feet.

   Close+5 feet per element
   Medium+20 feet per element
   Long+80 feet per element

   Drawback: When this element is configured, the creator must select a school of magic from which he can cast spells. Spells from the selected school have their range reduced by the following amount per element configured in the staff:

   Close-5 feet per two elements
   Medium-10 feet per element
   Long-40 feet per element

Eldritch Venom
   Benefit: when this element is configured, the staff's creator must choose one ability score and one school of magic. Whenever a spell is cast from the selected school and causes damage to one or more targets, each target must make a successful Fortitude save (DC 10 + spell level) or suffer 1d4 points of temporary damage to that ability.
   Drawback: Whenever a target suffers ability damage from this element, the cast also suffers one point of temporary ability damage to the same ability unless he makes a successful Fortitude save (DC 10 + spell level). The caster suffers a -1 penalty to this save for every additional creature beyond the first that suffers damage from this ability.
   Special: This element may be chosen multiple times. Each time, a different ability score and school of magic must be chosen for the benefit.

Embedded Spells
   Benefit: When this element is configured, the spellcaster selects one spell that he is currently able to cast. This spell no longer requires preparation, and the caster can replace any prepared spell of the appropriate level with this spell as long as he is wielding a staff. This ability works exactly like a cleric's ability to spontaneously cast cure or inflict spells, or a druid's ability to spontaneously cast summon nature's ally spells.
   Drawback: When this element is configured, the spellcaster must select one spell that he can cast of the same level as the spell chosen to gain the benefit. Whenever this spell is cast, the staff's owner suffers a 50% arcane spell failure chance.
   Special: This element may be chosen multiple times. Each time, a different spell must be chosen for the benefit and a different spell must be chosen for the drawback.

Focused Infusion
   Benefit: When this element is configured, the spellcaster must select one spell descriptor (see Special Spell Effects in the Player's Handbook, Chapter 10, Pages 171-174). Any spell with this descriptor cast by the staff's creator is treated as if the caster were one caster level higher than his actual level for purposes of determining level-dependent effects.
   Drawback: When this element is configured, the spellcaster must select one spell descriptor. Spells with this descriptor require a spell slot one level higher than normal to cast.
   Special: This element may be chosen multiple times. Each time, a different pair of spell descriptors must be chosen for the benefit and the drawback.

Forceful Casting
   Benefit: When this element is selected, the creator must select a single school of magic. Whenever the caster unleashes a spell from this school while wielding the staff, the target or targets of the spell must make a Fortitude save (DC 10 + the caster's caster level). If a target fails this save, he is knocked prone in the square in which he is currently standing.
   Drawback: When this element is configured into the staff's matrix, the staff's owner received a permanent -1 penalty to all Fortitude saves.
   Special: This element may be chosen multiple times. Each time, a different school of magic must be chosen and the penalty to Fortitude saves increases by an additional -1.

Recursive Casting
   Benefit: When this element is configured, the creator must select a single spell he can cast. Whenever that spell is cast, the spellcaster may make a Spellcraft check (DC 20 + spell level). If the Spellcraft check is successful, the spell may be cast again in the following round without using any of he caster's spell slots. Note that the target of the spell can change between castings, and the spellcaster may not make a Spellcraft check to cast the spell three or more times. This element only affects spells with a casting time of a full-round action or less, and each recursive casting also requires the same type of action that casting the spell the first time did.
   Drawback: When this element is configured, the caster loses the ability to scribe or use scrolls of any kind. The spellcaster may still learn a spell from a scroll, but may not use it as a spell-completion item.

Reflexive Casting
   Benefit: When this element is configured, the creator must select a single touch spell. He may now cast that spell as an Attack of Opportunity provided he has it prepared (or, if he is a spontaneous spell caster, has available spell slots of the appropriate spell level or higher) when the attack is provoked. The creator must be wielding the staff in order to cast the spell, and is considered to have the normal threat range when doing so.
   Drawback: When this element is configured, the character must choose a spell slot of the same level as the spell chosen for its benefit. The character permanently loses that spell slot.
   Special: This element may be chosen multiple times. Each time, a different touch spell must be chosen for the benefit.

Shredded Resistance
   Benefit: When this element is configured, the spellcaster must select a school of magic from which he can cast spells. Spells that are cast from the selected school receive a +1 bonus to any caster level checks made to overcome spell resistance. This bonus increases by +1 each time an additional element is configured.
   Drawback: A spellcaster wielding an eldritch staff with this element becomes more susceptible to enemy spells. As a result, any time an opponent must make a caster level check to overcome the wielder's spell resistance, that opponent gains a +2 bonus to his check.
   Special: This element may be chosen multiple times. Each time, a different school of magic must be taken for the benefit, and the size of the drawback increases by an additional +2.

Susceptible Target
Creature Type% Roll
Elemental (Water)
1
Vermin
2
Animal
3-4
Elemental (Earth)
5-6
Elemental (Air)
7-9
Elemental (Fire)
10-12
Outsider (Earth)
13-15
Ooze
16-19
Outsider
20-23
Outsider (Water)
24-27
Shapechanger
28-31
Construct
32-35
Giant
36-39
Outsider (Air)
40-43
Dragon
44-46
Fey
47-49
Outsider (Good)
50-52
Plant
53-55
Monstrous Humanoid
56-59
Outsider (Fire)
60-63
Outsider (Chaotic)
64-67
Outsider (Lawful)
68-71
Beast
72-75
Humanoid
76-80
Outsider (Evil)
81-85
Undead
86-90
Aberration
91-95
Magical Beast
96-100
   Benefit: The caster must select one monster type (dragon, monstrous humanoid, giant, and so on) when this element is configured. Whenever a creature of this type is affected by a spell cast while the staff is wielded, it suffers a -4 penalty to its save. If the Humanoid type is selected for the benefit of this element, the creator must select a specific humanoid subtype for the benefit.
   Drawback: When this element is configured, one random monster type (determined using the table to the right) becomes immune to spells cast by the wielder of the staff. If the Humanoid type is rolled, a specific humanoid subtype must be selected by the DM.

Note: If a creature falls into more than one type, and one of its types is selected in either the benefit or the drawback portion of this element, then the creature is affected in the appropriate way. If the same creature type is rolled when choosing the drawback of this element, roll on the table again for a new creature type.

   Special: This element may be chosen multiple times. Each time, a different type of creature must be chosen for both the benefit and the drawback.

Thoughtless Cast
   Benefit: When this element is configured, the spellcaster must select a single spell (which may require no more than a standard action to cast). The selected spell can be cast as a free action, but the spellcaster must sacrifice an additional prepared (or uncast, for sorcerers) spell of the same or higher level when the benefit of this element is used.
   Drawback: The staff's wielder can never apply the Quicken Spell metamagic to any spell of the same level as the spell chosen for the benefit of this element.
   Special: This element may be chosen multiple times. Each time, a different spell must be chosen.

Wordless Cast
   Benefit: When this element, and each additional element, is configured, the spellcaster must select a single spell. The selected spell can be cast without the need for verbal components.
   Drawback: When this element is configured, the spellcaster must select a school of magic from which he can cast spells. When spells from the selected school are cast, they are accompanied by a cacophonous burst of sound that is clearly audible for 10 feet per caster level of the spellcaster. Spells selected as a benefit for this element are not affected by this drawback.

Wielding the Staff
In order to receive any of the benefits provided by the elements within the eldritch staff's matrix, the staff must be in the spellcaster's hand. When held, the power of the staff floods through the user and allows him to draw upon its power as he casts spells, The spellcaster may choose not to use the benefit of his staff for any spell he casts. Doing so, however, does not relieve the effects of any drawbacks, which remain with the character whether he wields the staff or not.

Damaging the Staff
These items of power are a favorite target among those who hunt spellcasters and monsters who understand what a staff represents. Though the bond between a spellcaster and his staff is not a intense or as intimate as the bond shared with a familiar, it is still a painful experience to lose a staff.

A staff begins its life with the same durability as a wooden quarterstaff: A Hardness of 5, 2 hit points, and a Break DC of 14. This fragility is frightening to many spellcasters who take great pains to further improve the strength and durability of the eldritch staff, Though there is certainly a strong desire to simply pile as much protection onto the staff as possible, this is not practical - too much tampering with the staff dampens its matrix and jeopardizes the weapon as a whole.

At every odd level (not including 1st level, even if the staff is created at this level), the creator is able to add protection to the eldritch staff. The amount of protection that may be added is based on the power of the arcane matrix: The more powerful the matrix, the stronger the protection surrounding it can be without causing disruption of its effects. Consult the Staff Protection table below to determine the amount of protection possible based on the number of elements in the staff's matrix, as well as the cost of adding that protection. If a spellcaster chooses not to add protection when the option is available (at each odd level), he can pay the combined cost for each step that he skipped in addition to the cost of the new step to bring the staff's protection up to date.

Staff Protection
Number
of Elements
Hardness
Increase
CostHit Point
Increase
CostBreak DC
Increase
Cost
1110051,50011,000
22400103,00022,000
34900154,50033,000
461,600206,00044,000
582,500257,50055,000
6103,600309,00066,000
7124,900329,60077,000
8156,4003411,20088,000
9188,1003611,80099,000
102010,0004012,0001010,000
The cost of this protection is based on the difficulty of acquiring the special materials needed to provide the staff with its own armor. For each new step of protection added, the spellcaster must succeed at a Spellcraft check (DC 10 + the number of elements in the staff's matrix). If the spellcaster has at least five ranks in the Craft: Woodworking, Craft: Weaponsmithing, or Craft: Jeweler skills, he receives a +2 synergy bonus to this roll.

On a failed Spellcraft check, the raw materials for the attempt are lost, but the spellcaster can try again until he succeeds provided he pays the cost to acquire new raw materials. Each attempt requires one day per element in the staff's matrix, during which time the spellcaster must work for a solid eight hours a day with no interruption lasting more than a few minutes. If the spellcaster is unable to work for eight hours a day, or he is interrupted for some reason, the day does not count toward the time needed to enhance the staff's protection.

The Broken Staff
If a staff breaks, the spellcaster is in for a great deal of pain and suffering. On the plus side, the destruction of the eldrtich staff removes all drawbacks formerly imposed by the staff's arcane matrix. The loss of the staff disrupts the spellcaster's own energies: Immediately upon the destruction of the staff, the owner suffers a permanent loss of 1d4 hit points. These hit points may not be restored by any method - when the connection with the staff is destroyed, it takes some of the spellcaster with it. In addition, the spellcaster permanently loses one spell slot of a random level.

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