Friday, December 9, 2016

House Rules - Magic Poisons

Magic Poisons (from The Book of Eldritch Might)

Assassins are a deviously creative lot. In a world where their victim can come back from the dead even faster than it took to put them there in the first place, a few magical tricks can help a non-spellcaster (or a minor spellcaster) use spell-like attacks - in this case, through the edge of a blade or laced into a glass of wine.

Every magical poison described here carries two effects: Its normal, non magical poisoning effect, and an accompanying magical effect. The magical effects are instantaneous, thus not subject to dispelling. Victims with Spell resistance may use their resistance to avoid the magical effect (though not the non-magical one).

Creatures immune to poisons are immune to the spell-like effects of magic poisons as well. Neutralize poison can render both aspects of a magic poison harmless; treat as though dispel magic were cast against the caster level of the magic poison's creator. Thus, to cancel out effects, a caster of neutralize poison makes a level check with a DC of 11 + the caster level listed with the poison.

Creating Magic Poisons

Magic poisons may be made by those with the feat Manufacture Magic Poison. Magic poisons are brewed and simmered for a long time, or produced by feeding special ingredients to plants that in turn produce the required effect. Thus, it often takes weeks to produce a magic poison. Unlike most magic item creation processes, during the process you only need to spend one hour per day working on the poison.

To figure the market price for a magic poison, determine the approximate level of the poison's effect and multiply 60 shillings times the spell level times the caster level. The prices pertaining to spells that often affect a number of targets should be adjusted downward when placed into a poison (which only affects one creature); reduce these prices by up to 20%.

otherwise, manufacturing magic poisons is much like creating a potion, as described in the Dungeon Master's Guide.

Magic Poison Powers

Using Magic Poisons
Each of the magic poisons listed in this section is meant to be added to a mundane poison, like those found in the Dungeon Master's Guide. They do not have to be. If you desire only the magical effect, add the magical powers to an inert paste instead of to a poison. Characters can coat a blade with this substance or ally it directly to food or drink to be ingested

Note that some magic poisons, such as coldheart, take effect only when the save against the actual poison fails. These would have no effect if added to an innocuous substance.
Coldheart: The victim suffers 3d6 points of cold damage upon the failure of each save against the poison. There is no additional save for the cold damage.
  Caster Level: 5th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, mark of frost; Market Price: 900 shillings.

Crippling Doom: Victims who fail a Will save (DC 11) are filled with dread and pain, suffering a -2 morale penalty to attack rolls, checks, and saving throws for two minutes.
  Caster Level: 2nd; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, doom; Market Price: 120 shillings.

Darkmind: Victims who fail a Fortitude save (DC 19) fall into a coma, alive but unable to take actions of any kind, physical or mental. The coma lasts 1d10 days.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, coma; Market Price: 4,700 shillings.

Delusion: The victim of this poison is deluded into ignoring the damage it inflicts. The character simply does not recognize that the poison has had an effect. No save.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, confusion; Market Price: 1,500 shillings.

Demonseed: Anyone slain by this poison and then raised becomes possessed by a demon. Until the demon is dispelled (via dispel evil or similar spell), treat the character as chaotic evil with an agenda of destruction (often achieved through guile - the demon won't necessarily make its presence known immediately). Use all the character's normal abilities and skills. No save.
  Caster Level: 9th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, lesser planar binding; Market Price: 3,000 shillings.

Denial: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 19) or thereafter become unable to enter a 100-foot-square area designated by the creator.
  Caster Level: 13th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, forbiddance; Market Price: 4,500 shillings.

Fear: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 16) or be gripped with great fear. Treat the character as panicked for 8 rounds.
  Caster Level: 8th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, fear; Market Price: 1,600 shillings.

Fireheart: The victim suffers 3d6 points of fire damage upon the failure of each save versus the poison. There is no additional save for the fire damage.
  Caster Level: 5th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, mark of fire; Market Price: 900 shillings.

Heartthief: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 16) or lose all memory of the person closest to him.
  Caster Level: 11th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, feeblemind; Market Price: 4,000 shillings.

Longnight: Those slain by this poison or the attack which delivered it (if any) gain a special 30 Spell Resistance against any attempt to raise, resurrect (including true resurrection) or reincarnate them. No save.
  Caster Level: 17th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, soul bind; Market Price: 9,000 shillings.

Madness: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 20) or go insane as described in the spell insanity.
  Caster Level: 13th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, insanity; Market Price: 5,400 shillings.

Memory Key: This poison is always made with a specific target in mind. The creator specifies a single memory of a subject - such as meeting a certain individual, the events of a single evening, or an important password - to be destroyed forever in the victim's mind. spells, skills, feats, and other character abilities cannot be forgotten. Major memories, such as the existence of a character's husband or where she comes from, are beyond the scope of this poison. The victim gets a Fortitude save (DC 16) to resist this effect.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, feeblemind; Market Price: 1,500 shillings.

Shrivelsoul: If the victim of this poison dies (either through the poison's damage or the attack which delivered it, if any), the corpse immediately shrivels and effectively ages a year, so that raise dead will not work. A resurrection is needed to bring the character back to life. No save.
  Caster Level: 11th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, slay living; Market Price: 3,500 shillings.

Sleep: A victim of 6 Hit Dice or lower must make a Fortitude save (DC 11) or fall asleep for three minutes or until awakened.
  Caster Level: 3rd; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, sleep; Market Price: 180 shillings.

Slow: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 14) or be slowed (as the spell) for 7 rounds.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, slow; Market Price: 1,100 shillings.

Swarmdeath: The victim of this poison must make a Fortitude save (DC 17) or be killed instantly by the swarm of crawling and flying insects that appears in his stomach and bursts out.
  Caster Level: 9th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, insect plague, slay living; Market Price: 2,700 shillings.

Truesleep: A victim of 10 Hit Dice or lower falls asleep for one hour. There is no saving throw (although immunity to sleep effects and normal spell resistance still apply).
  Caster Level: 9th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, greater sleep; Market Price: 2,700 shillings.

Weakening: This poison magically saps 1d4 points of Strength from the victim upon the failure of each save.
  Caster Level: 5th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, ray of enfeeblement; Market Price: 1,200 shillings.

Wraithsong: The victim of this poison has one negative level, as if touched by a wraith. No save.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, enervation; Market Price: 1,600 shillings.

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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

General Rules - Rage Feats

This is a list of rage feats that do not appear in the Player's Handbook, but that I use in my campaigns. All of these feats require that the character have the ability to rage, as a barbarian. As feats get added to my ongoing campaigns, I will add more to this listing.

Feat Name
Source
PrerequisitesBenefit
Blood of Thunor
-
Human or Khülen, ability to rageWhen you rage, you gain bonus damage points that may be applied to your attacks
Collective Fury
-
Ability to rage, WarcryYour rage gives nearby raging allies the ability to make a Warcry
Furious Strength
-
Ability to rageYou can forego normal rage bonuses for one round of tremendous strength
Fury’s Focus
-
Ability to rageYour move increases by +10 feet while you rage
Holy Fury
-
Ability to channel positive energy, ability to rageYou can channel holy energy to be able to inflict critical hits on undead while raging
Raging Jump
-
Ability to rage, Jump 3+ ranksYou can shorten your rage to enhance your ability to jump
Savage Health
-
Constitution 15+, ability to rageYou can gain temporary hit points when you rage
Warcry
-
Charisma 13+, ability to rageYou can terrify opponents when you rage with a mighty shout

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Sunday, December 4, 2016

House Rules - New Armor

New Armor

This is a list of armors that do not appear in the Player's Handbook, but that I use in my campaigns. As armors get added to my ongoing campaigns, I will add more to this listing. These armors have been adapted from Bow & Blade: A Guidebook to Wood Elves, Nyambe, and Path of the Sword.

Armor
Light Armor
Cost
Armor/Shield
Bonus
Max Dex
Bonus
Armor Check
Penalty
Arcane Spell
Failure
Weight 1
Beaded Armor 2
25 shillings
+2
+6
-1
15%
15 lbs.
Bone Armor 2
300 shillings
+3
+6
-2
15%
15 lbs.
Chitin Armor 2
45 shillings
+4
+3
-3
20%
25 lbs.
Gyad'hywr Breastplate 2
3,000 shillings
+5
+4
-2
20%
15 lbs.
Heartwood Shirt 2
1,500 shillings
+5
+4
-3
25%
25 lbs.
Leafweave Armor 2
350 shillings
+2
+6
-2
10%
10 lbs.
Menaevian War Paint 2
15 shillings
+1
-
0
0%
1 lb.
Spidersilk Vest 2
500 shillings
+3
+7
-1
5%
5 lbs.
Woven Cord Armor 2
10 shillings
+1
+7
-1
5%
10 lbs.
Medium Armor
Cost
Armor/Shield
Bonus
Max Dex
Bonus
Armor Check
Penalty
Arcane Spell
Failure
Weight 1
Iron Mantle Armor
150 shillings
+5
+2
-5
30%
30 lbs.
Woodweave Coat 2
1,500 shillings
+4
+3
-3
25%
15 lbs.
Shields
Cost
Armor/Shield
Bonus
Max Dex
Bonus
Armor Check
Penalty
Arcane Spell
Failure
Weight
Buzzshield
50 shillings
+1
-
-1
10%
10 lbs.
Large leather shield 2
5 shillings
+2
-
-2
15%
7 lbs.
Leather body shield 2
15 shillings
+3
-
-5
25%
15 lbs.
Parrying shield 2
20 shillings
+1
-
-1
10%
6 lbs.
Small leather shield 2
2 shillings
+1
-
-1
5%
3 lbs.
1 Weight figures are for armor sized to fit Medium characters. Armor fitted for Small characters weighs half as much, and armor fitted for Large characters weighs twice as much.
2 Can be worn or used by druids without penalty.

Armor Descriptions

Beaded Armor: This armor is made from beads and woven leather cord. This makes the armor highly decorative, yet still provides some degree of protection to the wearer. It is most commonly used by the tribesmen of the At'viras Steppes and the Tozlu Desert. Beaded armor can be donned in 1 minute, donned hastily in 5 rounds, and removed in 1 minute.

Bone Armor: Thin strips of bone line the outisde of a hide shirt, making this armor both light and durable. Although it offers excellent protection compared to most light armor, it does not have the durability of comparable metal armor.

Buzzshield: The buzzshield is an example of what happens when the ingenuity of the Hartzstadt dwarves is applied to war. The buzzshield is the size of a small steel shield, and anyone with the Shield proficiency can used it as one without penalty. If the wielder also has Exotic Weapon Proficiency (Buzzshield), it is something more.

The buzzshield contains a powerful spring, a complex gearing mechanism, and a number of retractable metal teeth. When wound up (a full round action that provokes and attack of opportunity), it becomes a lethal weapon, all the while still functioning as a shield. The buzzshield can be used as an off-hand weapon, and is considered to be a light weapon for this purpose. The buzzshield remains wound for 1d4+4 rounds, and deals 1d6 points of slashing damage on a successful hit. It has a threat range of 20 x3.

The mechanism is robust, as it is designed for war, but it is not indestructible. After 25 rounds of use, the mechanism will need maintenance. Maintaining a buzzshield requires a DC 20 Craft: Weaponsmithing check and 10 minutes of work. Dwarves from Harzstadt gain a +4 bonus to this check, and can perform the work in half the time. if the shield is used without maintenance, it ceases to function as anything but a small shield until repaired.

Chitin Armor: Goblinoids and others who live near insect-infested areas have learned to take advantage of the abundance of giant arthropods, forming useful armor from their discarded husks. While some feel that only shells stripped from living beasts have the flexibility to make decent armor, most husk-hunters find a freshly shed exoskeleton to be just as good and far easier to obtain.

Chitin armor offers decent protection, and is often used by goblinoids. It has one major drawback - it is incredibly brittle. Any attack that deals more than 20 points of damage in a single blow shatters the armor. In addition, if the wearer of the armor takes more than 50 points of damage before he can repair the armor, the husk is destroyed. Repairing the armor requires a DC 20 Craft: Armorsmithing check and takes an hour.

Gyad'hywr Breatplate: This is a breastplate made from gyad'hwyr wood.

Heartwood Shirt: Made of specially treated wood grown in secret groves by khülen druids and spirit shamen, this is one of the finest and most expensive forms of armor available. Although made of wood, it has the hardness and hit points of normal steel.

Iron Mantle Armor: Iron mantle armor is made from a number of iron plates held together with leather straps, and covers the wearer's shoulders and chest. Iron mantle armor can be donned in 4 minutes, donned hastily in 1 minute, and removed in 1 minute.

Large Leather Shield: A leather shield is lighter than a metal or wooden shield, but easier to damage. The leather is cured until it is hard enough to deflect attacks. A large leather shield has hardness 3 and 12 hit points.

Leafweave Armor: Made from lacquered leaves by woodland crafters, leafweave armor is light, durable, and extremely flexible. Its only disadvantage compared to other light armor is its high price, due mainly to the intricate craftsmanship and rare materials used in its creation.

Leather Body Shield: A body shield is only slightly smaller than a tower shield. Such a shield would be unwieldy if made from any material oher than leather. The leather is cured until it is hard enough to deflect attacks. A large leather shield has hardness 3 and 15 hit points.

Menaevian War Paint: The warriors of Menaevia have been often observed patrolling their wild nation covered in swirls and whorls of color. Those who know the secret of Menaevian war paint know why they wear this gaudy spectacle, except for the fact that they are most likely dead.

When applied, Menaevian war paint is a riot of clashing colors, usually greens, reds, and tans. It remains thus until the wearer remains still for 1d4 rounds. At the end of this time, the brightly colored paint slowly changes to match the surrounding foliage - not a perfect match, but close enough to add considerably to Hide checks, giving a +6 circumstance bonus. If the wearer moves suddenly - more than half speed - the paint reverts to its bright color scheme. The effect is that brightly painted, garish warriors seem to materialize out of nowhere.

Menaevian war paint also serves to protect the skin slightly. Once dry, it is surprisingly tough, acting as skin-tight armor that provides a +1 armor bonus to its wearer. Applying Menaevian war paint takes 15 minutes; removing it takes about 1 minute. No other armor can be worn while using the paint. It is extremely rare for Menaevians to sell this paint to non-Menaevians. An alchemist who has a sample to work with might be able to figure out the recipe with a DC 35 Craft: Alchemy check. Once the formula is known, manufacturing more requires a DC 25 Craft: Alchemy check.

Menaevian war paint assists in Hide checks only when in wilderness locales. It is worse than useless in cities or inside structures, conferring a -2 circumstance penalty to Hide checks.

Parrying Shield: A parrying shield is a special shield often used by the inhabitants of the Tozlu Desert. It is a small leather shield with special projections used for deflecting arrows. A wielder must have the Parrying Shield feat to make full use of a parrying shield. A parrying shield has hardness 3 and 9 hit points.

Small Leather Shield: A leather shield is lighter than a metal or wooden shield, but easier to damage. The leather is cured until it is hard enough to deflect attacks. A large leather shield has hardness 3 and 7 hit points.

Spidersilk Vest: It is well known that spider's silk is many times stronger than steel. While the chitine have been known to farm spiders for their silk, other must resort to hunting monstrous spiders in wild for their supply. Any monstrous spider of at least Large size can provide enough silk for a single spidersilk vest for a Medium-size creature. A DC 30 Craft: Weaving check is required to convert the spider threads into silk cloth, and a DC 27 Craft: Tailor check is needed to successfully craft the silk into the vest.

Woodweave Coat: Made from wooden strips of specially treated wood, this armor is favored by many khülen woodsmen and warriors. Although made of wood, it has the hardness and hit points of normal steel.

Woven Cord Armor: This armor is made from woven fibers. Though not as flexible as leather amor, woven cord armor offers superior ventilation. As a result, woven cord armor is commonly used by the denizens of the At'viras Steppes, and sometimes by the inhabitants of the Tozlu Desert. Woven cord armor can be donned in 1 minute, donned hastily in 5 rounds, and removed in 1 minute.

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House Rules - Adventuring Equipment

Adventuring Equipment

Item
Cost
Weight
Javelin Thrower
2 shillings
2 lbs.
Potion Belt
1 shilling
1 lb.
Potion Belt, Masterwork
60 shillings
1 lb.
Scroll Organizer
5 shillings
½ lb.
Weapon Harness
5 shillings
5 lbs.
This is a collection of equipment that is generally of interest to adventurers. There are no weapons or armor listed here, nor are there items that are specific to either arcane or divine spellcasters. Rather, these items are general-purpose gear that many characters will find useful to carry. This list does not include many items of interest to rogues, as those are found on the Black Market Items and Poisons page.

Item Descriptions

Javelin Thrower: (Nyambe) This ancient weapon provides greater leverage to thrown javelins, increasing their range and power. The javelin thrower is a grooved stick with a notch at one end used for propelling javelins, throwing spears, or barbed spears. To use the thrower, a javelin is loaded into the groove, and the user swings the stick with an overhand throwing motion, flinging the weapon forward with much more force than is possible with an unassisted throw.

Using a javelin thrower doubles the range increment of the javelin or spear used, increases its threat range to 19-20, and increases its critical multiplier by one step. Loading a javelin thrower is a move-equivalent action, and using one to throw a javelin is a standard action, which prevents skilled throwers from making multiple attacks.

Potion Belt: (Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting) This sturdy leather belt similar to a bandoleer has pockets shaped to hold potion vials and is fitted with ties or flaps to keep the potions from falling out. The belt holds six potions. Retrieving a potion from a potion belt is a free action once per round. Craft: Leatherworking DC: 15.

Potion Belt, Masterwork: (Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting) This extremely well-made potion belt holds ten potions. Retrieving a potion from a potion belt is a free action once per round. Craft: Leatherworking DC: 20.

Scroll Organizer: (Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting) This long strip of leather has an overlapping series of fifteen pockets sewn along one side, each large enough to hold a scroll of a single spell. When slipped into a pocket, only the top of the scroll shows, allowing you to scan the scroll's titles. Craft: Leatherworking DC: 15.

Weapon Harness: (Path of the Sword) This lightweight harness slips over the user's backpack and over the arms. It has two chest belts (one directly below the chest, the other across the chest) that must be secured lest the harness fall off. The harness has sheathes for two swords on the back, as well as two hooks that snap together and hold two Medium-size weapons on the waist. There is also a sheath on the from of the weapon harness, and six sheathes along the front straps hold daggers. Craft: Leatherworking DC: 15.

Mundane Weapon Enhancements

Item
Cost
Weight
Armor-Piercing
+50% of base weapon cost
-
Basket Hilt
+15% of base weapon cost
-
Bent Grip
+15% of base weapon cost
-
Hollow Hilt
+15 shillings
-
Hollow Hilt, Masterwork
+45 shillings
-
Shielded Grip
+25% of base weapon cost
-
Strengthened
+50% of base weapon cost
+50% of base weapon weight
Weighted
+100% of base weapon cost
+50% of base weapon weight
Armor-Piercing: (Path of the Sword) This may be applied only to light weapons that deal piercing damage. The weapon has been modified to slip between pieces of armor. Against any opponent with an armor bonus to Armor Class, this weapon grants a +1 bonus to attack rolls. This bonus does not apply to an opponent that only has a natural armor bonus to Armor Class.

Basket Hilt: (Path of the Sword) This is a complex grip that wraps around the wielder's hand. It can only be used on Medium-sized weapons or less that are to be wielded with one hand. The basket hilt grants the wielder a +2 bonus to resist disarm attempts.

Bent Grip: (Player's Guide to Fighters and Barbarians) A bent grip allows great control over a weapon, though at some cost of power. This grip has a number of flanges and a significant curve, allowing it to fit easily in the hand. Bent grips function properly on any light sword and on one-handed piercing swords. This grip may not be fitted on other weapons. Weapons with a bent grip gain a +1 enhancement bonus to their threat range (which does not stack with enchantments that also improve the threat range). The bent grip is commonly used in Enslem and the Gorovlic Isles.

Hollow Hilt: (Path of the Sword) A weapon with a hollow hilt has a small compartment in the hilt, grip, or shaft, which can store 4 cubic inches worth of material in a Small weapon, or 6 cubic inches of material in a Medium weapon.

Hollow Hilt, Masterwork: (Path of the Sword) This is a small compartment in the hilt, grip, or shaft of a weapon, just as above, only applied to a masterwork weapon. The compartment can store 6 cubic inches worth of material in a Small weapon, or 8 cubic inches of material in a Medium weapon.

Shielded Grip: (Player's Guide to Fighters and Barbarians) One of a number of protected grips, such as shell or basket hilts, the shielded grip is used in a variety of bladed weapons - including daggers, rapiers, and longswords. If a weapon with a shielded grip is employed in battle, and the wielder is using Combat Expertise, the AC bonus gained through the use of that feat is increased by +1. This bonus increases to +2 if the Combat Expertise proficient character is using two shielded grip weapons, but only if they posses the Two-Weapon Fighting feat. Additionally, shielded grip grant a +1 circumstance bonus for the purpose of resisting disarm attempts.

Strengthening: (Path of the Sword) The weapon is made of stronger, thicker materials. This makes it considerably heavier, but also harder to break. A strengthened weapon has its hardness increased by 1 and its hit points increased by 25% (rounded up). This increases the weight of the weapon by 50%.

Weighted: (Path of the Sword) This improvement may only be applied to weapons that deal bludgeoning damage. The head of the weapon is designed to be extremely heavy by adding extra metal, wrapping it in steel bands, and so on. This increases the weapon's damage by +1 and increases the weight of the weapon by 50%.

Mundane Armor Improvements

It is possible to commission easily distinguished or customized pieces. Below you will find an outline of several of these enhancements, their costs, and the benefits of taking the time to be unique.

Precisely Fitted Armor: Armor can be tailored to a specific individual. Such armor must be crafted of masterwork quality and tailored specifically the the character as part of its construction. The character who wears the armor must be measured precisely before the work can commence, and then the cost of the armor is increased by 50%. Precisely fitted armor has some minor, but useful benefits, as follows:
  • Hasty donning time is reduced by one round if the armor is light armor, by two rounds if the armor is medium armor or heavy armor other than half-plate or full-plate, and by one minute if the armor is half-plate or full-plate.
  • The precise fit enables you to move more easily within it, reducing the apparent weight by 10% for purposes of load calculation. This weight reduction also applies to Swim checks.
  • Well-made armor simply looks better. You gain a +1 circumstance bonus to Bluff and Diplomacy checks in circumstance in which the target of the check would be favorably impressed by someone in high-quality armor.
Embossed and Decorated Armor and Weapons: Both armor and weapons can be covered with decorations, fine enameled designs, intricate embossed patterns, and so on. This does nothing for the functionality of the armor or weapon, but it does make the equipment extremely distinctive. Characters who are nobles, high-ranking military commanders, or successful merchants might desire such equipment to demonstrate their status and wealth. Decorated and personalized items grant the following benefits:
  • The items are much easier to locate if stolen. Add a +2 circumstance bonus to any Gather Information checks related to tracking down lost or stolen items that have been decorated.
  • Those likely to be impressed by wealth, especially ostentatious displays of wealth, are going to be faorably disposed towards a character wielding decorated arms and armor. Such a character gains a +2 circumstance bonus to Bluff and Diplomacy checks against such individuals.
The one major drawback to such items is that extensive field use can mar the fine craftsmanship. Any time a character sustains more than 50% of his hit points in damage, decorated armor has been marred and must be repaired. Likewise, if a character scores more than two critical hits with a decorated weapon in a single combat, it is also considered marred and must be repaired.

Decorated items cost a minimum of double the cost of masterwork items of the same type (although they are not necessarily masterwork - if a character wants a decorated masterwork item, they must pay the cost for masterwork quality as well). If the character insists on particularly costly decorations - for example, an image of the character slaying a green dragon to be placed on a large shield, with the dragon made from precisely cut emeralds, and the character formed of rubies - the price can be as high as the DM thinks is reasonable.

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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

House Rules - Heavy Weapons

Heavy Weapons

Old Damage (Each Die)New Damage
1
1d2
1d2
1d3
1d3
1d4
1d4
1d6
1d6
1d8
1d8 or 1d10
2d6
1d12
2d8
Heavy weapons, such as those made from gold or platinum, are unwieldy, but inflict additional damage. Without the proper Exotic Weapon Proficiency feat (for example, heavy longsword), you suffer a -4 penalty on attack rolls with a heavy weapon. Only weapons made entirely or largely of metal (such as swords or axes) are affected. Other weapons (such as spears) are not.

Weapons made of a heavy metal inflict increased damage as shown on the table to the right.

A character can wield a heavy weapon one size category smaller than his own in two hands to avoid the attack penalty. For instance, a human wielding a light mace made of gold with both hands, or an ogre wielding a platinum longsword with two hands, does not suffer the attack penalty.

You can never use the Weapon Finesse feat with a weapon made of a heavy metal.

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House Rules - Special Materials

Special Materials
In addition to magic items created with spells, some substances have innate special properties. The special powers of these materials are nonmagical, and thus continue to function even in an area where magic does not. Any resistance effects granted by these materials does not stack with similar effects. Any item fashioned from one of the materials listed here is treated as a masterwork item, except the extra cost is as listed for the material. The masterwork quality does not affect the enhancement bonus of weapons or the armor check penalty of armor. The market price modifier always refers to the weight of the normal (steel) object, not the object's weight in the unusual metal. If you make a suit of armor or weapon out of more than one special material, you get the benefit of only the most prevalent material. However, you can build a double weapon with each head made of a different special material.

Each of the special materials described below has a definite game effect. Some creatures have damage reduction based on their creature type or core concept. Some are resistant to all but a special type of damage, such as that dealt by evil-aligned weapons or bludgeoning weapons. Others are vulnerable to weapons of a particular material. Characters may choose to carry several different types of weapons, depending upon the campaign and types of creatures they most commonly encounter.

Type of ItemEnhancement BonusMarket Price Modifier
Light armor
DR 1/-
+5,000 shillings
Medium armor
DR 2/-
+10,000 shillings
Heavy armor
DR 3/-
+15,000 shillings
Shield
+1
+2,000 shillings
Ammunition
+1
+60 shillings
Weapon, damage up to 1d6
+1
+3,000 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d8 or higher
+2
+9,000 shillings
Adamantine: This ultrahard metal adds to the quality of a weapon or suit of armor. Weapons fashioned from adamantine have a natural enhancement bonus on attacks and damage, as listed below, and the ability to bypass hardness when sundering weapons or attacking objects, ignoring hardness less than 20. These bonuses do not stack with any other enhancement bonuses. Adamantine is so costly that weapons and armor made from it are always of masterwork quality; the masterwork cost is included in the prices given below. Armor made from adamantine grants its wearer damage reduction, and the armor check penalty of adamantine armor is lessened by 1 compared to ordinary armor of its type. Items without metal parts cannot be made from adamantine. An arrow could be made of adamantine, but a quarterstaff could not.

Only weapons, armor, and shields normally made of metal can be fashioned from adamantine. Weapons, armor and shields normally made of steel that are made of adamantine have one-third more hit points than normal. Adamantine weighs the same as steel, has hardness 20, and 40 hit points per inch of thickness.

Type of Alchemical Silver ItemMarket Price Modifier
Ammunition
+2 shillings
Small weapon
+20 shillings
Medium weapon, or one head of a double weapon
+90 shillings
Large weapon or both heads of a double weapon
+180 shillings
Alchemical Silver: A complex process involving metallurgy and alchemy can bond silver to a weapon made of steel so that it bypasses the damage reduction of creatures such as lycanthropes. On a successful attack with a silvered weapon, the wielder takes a -1 penalty on the damage roll (with the usual minimum of 1 point of damage). The alchemical silvering process can’t be applied to nonmetal items, and it doesn’t work on rare metals such as adamantine, cold iron, and mithral. Alchemical silver weighs the same as steel, has 10 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 8.

Cold Iron: This iron, mined deep underground and known for its effectiveness against fey creatures, is forged at a lower temperature to preserve its delicate properties. Weapons made of cold iron cost twice as much to make as their normal counterparts. Also, any magical enhancements cost an additional 2,000 shillings.

Items without metal parts cannot be made from cold iron. An arrow could be made of cold iron, but a quarterstaff could not. A double weapon that has only half of it made of cold iron increases its cost by 50%. Cold iron has 30 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 10.

Darkwood: This rare magic wood is as hard as normal wood but very light. Any wooden or mostly wooden item (such as a bow, an arrow, or a spear) made from darkwood is considered a masterwork item and weighs only half as much as a normal wooden item of that type. Items not normally made of wood or only partially of wood (such as a battleaxe or a mace) either cannot be made from darkwood or do not gain any special benefit from being made of darkwood. The armor check penalty of a darkwood shield is lessened by 2 compared to an ordinary shield of its type. To determine the price of a darkwood item, use the original weight but add 10 shillings per pound to the price of a masterwork version of that item. Darkwood has 10 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 5.

Dragonhide: Armorsmiths can work with the hides of dragons to produce armor or shields of masterwork quality. One dragon produces enough hide for a single suit of masterwork hide armor for a creature one size category smaller than the dragon. By selecting only choice scales and bits of hide, an armorsmith can produce one suit of masterwork banded mail for a creature two sizes smaller, one suit of masterwork half-plate for a creature three sizes smaller, or one masterwork breastplate or suit of full plate for a creature four sizes smaller. In each case, enough hide is available to produce a small or large masterwork shield in addition to the armor, provided that the dragon is Large or larger.

Because dragonhide armor isn’t made of metal, druids can wear it without penalty. Dragonhide armor costs double what masterwork armor of that type ordinarily costs, but it takes no longer to make than ordinary armor of that type. Dragonhide has hardness 10 and 10 hit points per inch of thickness.

Düsterstählern: An alloy made using rare iron deposits found mostly in the deep mines of Steinigreich, düsterstählern, also known as darksteel, is silvery in hue when polished or cut, but its exposed surfaces have a deep, gleaming purple luster. The process for making this type of steel was once lost, but was recently rediscovered thanks to some ancient dwarven texts. The alloy is made from a specific type of iron tempered with a variety of special oils.

Armor made from düsterstählern grants acid resistance 2. Weapons forged from düsterstählern inflict +1 point of electricity damage each time they hit (this is cumulative with other abilities, such as shocking or shocking burst. Items not primarily made of metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Düsterstählern weighs the same as steel, has hardness 10, and had 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,500 shillings.

Fever Iron: In some volcanic craters, pools of molten metal collect and are never allowed to fully cool. Sometimes these pools of semisolid metal attract raw magical energy and are transformed into what the dwarves call fever iron. Perhaps because of its proximity to Menaevia and Yle, such deposit seem to be most often found in Aidaföd. Fever iron can be made fully solid through a magical process that includes application of intense cold, after which it can be worked like normal iron.

Armor made from fever iron grants fire resistance 2. Weapons forged of fever iron inflict +1 point of fire damage each time they hit (this is cumulative with other abilities, such as flaming or flaming burst). Items not primarily made of metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Fever iron can never be used in a magic item that uses cold effects, such as a frost or icy burst weapon. Fever iron weighs the same as steel, has hardness 12, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,500 shillings.

Fíocopar: Copper is known to spellcasters as a magical purifier, aiding in magic that negates sickness and poison, as well as being an excellent conductor for electrical effects. While its brilliant color makes it popular for ornamental items, its relative softness makes it unsuitable for armor or weapons unless magic is used to extract the metaphysically pure form of copper, the true essence of copper in material form also known as fíocopar or truecopper.

Armor made from fíocopar grants cold resistance 2. Items not primarily made from metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail is affected, while a suit of studded leather is not). Fíocopar is favored by alvari for making weapons with the shocking or shocking burst properties.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings.

Géaradh: Géaradh is a rare natural metal usually found as streaks of blue-green ore amid vitreous glass. When refined and forged, the metal is silver-blue with a green reflective shine. The metal is famous for holding a sharp edge even when abused, and is the favored material for making keen weapons.

Armor made from géaradh grants sonic resistance 2. Items not primarily made of metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail is affected, while a suit of studded leather is not). Géaradh weighs the same as steel, has hardness 12, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings.

Type of Gold ItemMarket Price Modifier
Armor
+5,000 shillings
Weapon, damage up to 1d3
+1,500 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d4 or 1d6
+2,500 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d8 or higher
+7,000 shillings
Gold: While most use gold as currency, spellcasters know of gold's magical properties. When magically refined and treated, gold can be made hard as steel. The following information refers to magically treated gold.

Armor made from treated gold grants acid and fire resistance 2. Gold armors are one category heavier than normal for purposes of movement and other limitations (for example, whether a barbarian can use her fast movement ability while wearing the armor). Light armors are treated as medium, and medium and heavy armors are treated as heavy. Spell failure chances for armor and shields made of gold are increased by 10%, Maximum Dexterity bonus is decreased by 2 (which may bring it below 0), and armor check penalties are increased by 3.

Gold weapons are considered heavy weapons (see the post on Heavy Weapons). Items not primarily made from metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Magically treated gold weighs twice as much as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Gyad'r hywr Wood: Found deep in the great Llwyd Uchel Forest, the Gyad'r hywr trees are named for the eerie appearance of their tightly growing groves. Smooth, with small branches at the top of their up to 60-foot trunks, Gyad'r hywr trees have black bark and smoky gray wood that is as touch as iron.

Any steel or mostly steel weapon (such as a sword or a mace) made from gyad'r hywr wood is considered a masterwork item and weighs only half as much as a normal steel item of that type. Weapons not normally made of steel or only partially of steel (such as a club or battleaxe) either cannot be made from gyad'r hwyr wood or do not gain any special benefit or penalty from being made of gyad'r hwyr wood. If a weapon made from gyad'r hywr wood weighs less than a short sword (for a Medium creature) or a dagger (for a Small creature), that weapon can be treated as a light weapon.

Gyad'r hywr wood doesn't work well as armor; it cannot be shaped into rings like steel, and overlapping plates to not flex well. (Even the wood shape spell cannot create the level of detail needed). However, gyad'r hwyr wood breastplates are possible with the following statistics: Armor bonus +5, maximum Dexterity bonus +4, armor check penalty -2, and arcane spell failure 20%. A gyad'r hwr breastplate is considered light armor for the purposes of movement and other limitations. Gyad'r hwyr wood weighs half as much as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Weapon +1,500 shillings; breastplate +3,000 shillings.

Istål: This bone-white metal, sometimes known as icesteel, can take a high polish and is often mistaken for ivory when seen in finished items, but has a distinctive greenish sheen in candlelight. Istål ore is found in the clay dug from riverbanks in the Dekkulde Islands, and when refined it is soft and easily carved. A second heating makes it hard and durable. This property makes the metal ideal for decorative work and figurines.

Armor made from istål grants fire resistance 2. Weapons forged from the metal inflict +1 point of frost damage each time they hit (this is cumulative with other abilities, such as frost or icy burst). Items not primarily made from metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Istål can never be used in a magic item that uses fire effects, such as a flaming or flaming burst weapon. Istål weighs the same as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,500 shillings.

Liekkiteräs: This rare pale silvery gray metal is found only in scattered, but very rich deposits under mountains deep within the Hallitsijainen Empire as a softy, greenish-gray claylike ore or a flaky mud. One misstep in its refining and it remains useless mud.

Armor made from liekkiteräs grants cold resistance 2. Weapons forged of leikkiteräs inflict +1 point of electricity damage and +1 point of fire damage each time they hit (this is cumulative with other abilities). Items not primarily made of metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Leikkiteräs can never be used in a magic item that uses cold effects, such as frost or icy burst weapons. Leikkiteräs weighs the same as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,500 shillings.

Type of Living Metal ItemMarket Price Modifier
Light armor
+700 shillings
Medium armor
+2,000 shillings
Heavy armor
+4,500 shillings
Other items
+100 shillings per pound
Living Metal: Powerful sources of life energy, such as druid circles or sites holy to Eiur, somtimes leach energy into the soil, which changes the properties of any natural deposits of iron buried nearby. This living metal usually has a light gray-green color and has properties of natural repair and reshaping. It is favored in the construction of rings of regeneration.

Over time, armor made of living metal naturally shapes itself to fit its wearer. After ten days of regular wearing, increase the maximum Dexterity bonus by 1,reduce the armor check penalty by 1, and reduce the arcane spell failure chance by 5% for living metal armor. Armor not primarily made of metal is not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail is affected, while a suit of studded leather is not).

In addition, an item made of living metal naturally repairs damage to itself, healing 1 hit point per minute. It cannot repair itself if brought to 0 hit points or destroyed (such as through disintegration). Living metal weighs the same as steel, has hardness 12, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Type of Mithral ItemMarket Price Modifier
Light armor
+1,000 shillings
Medium armor
+4,000 shillings
Heavy armor
+9,000 shillings
Shield
+1,000 shillings
Other items
+500 shillings per pound
Mithral: Mithral is a very rare silvery, glistening metal that is lighter than iron but just as hard. When worked like steel, it becomes a wonderful material from which to create armor and is occasionally used for other items as well. Most mithral armors are one category lighter than normal for purposes of movement and other limitations. Heavy armors are treated as medium, and medium armors are treated as light, but light armors are still treated as light. Spell failure chances for armors and shields made from mithral are decreased by 10%, maximum Dexterity bonus is increased by 2, and armor check penalties are lessened by 3 (to a minimum of 0).

An item made from mithral weighs half as much as the same item made from other metals. In the case of weapons, this lighter weight does not change a weapon’s size category. If a weapon made from mithril weighs less than a short sword (for a Medium creature) or a dagger (for a Small creature), that weapon can be treated as a light weapon. Items not primarily of metal are not meaningfully affected by being partially made of mithral. (A longsword can be a mithral weapon, while a scythe cannot be). Any damage resistance that can be overcome by a silver weapon can also be overcome by a mithral weapon.

Weapons or armors fashioned from mithral are always masterwork items as well; the masterwork cost is included in the prices given below. Mithral weighs half as much as steel, has hardness 15, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Type of Platinum ItemMarket Price Modifier
Armor
+5,000 shillings
Weapon, damage up to 1d3
+1,500 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d4 or 1d6
+2,500 shillings
Weapon, damage 1d8 or higher
+7,000 shillings
Platinum: This silvery-white metal superficially resembles aluminum but is extremely heavy. Because it is so malleable, it must be magically altered to the rigidity of steel so it can maintain its shape even when used in combat. This process also catalyzes its magical properties. The following information refers to magically treated platinum.

Armor made from treated platinum grants cold and sonic resistance 2. Platinum armors are one category heavier than normal for purposes of movement and other limitations (for example, whether a barbarian can use her fast movement ability while wearing the armor). Light armors are treated as medium, and medium and heavy armors are treated as heavy. Spell failure chances for armor and shields made of platinum are increased by 10%, Maximum Dexterity bonus is decreased by 2 (which may bring it below 0), and armor check penalties are increased by 3.

Platinum weapons are considered heavy weapons (see the post on Heavy Weapons). Items not primarily made from metal are not meaningfully affected. (A suit of chainmail or a longsword is affected, while a club or suit of studded leather is not). Magically treated platinum weighs twice as much as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Silver: Long valued for its purity and beauty, silver is also used to make weapons and armor. Irt is commonly used to in items involving magic dedicated to Vali or Füllar, as well as bane weapons dedicated to battling shapechangers. With the proper magical treatments, silver gains the rigidity of steel. The following information refers to magically treated silver.

Armor made from silver grants electricity resistance 2. Weapons forged of treated silver can damage creatures whose damage reduction type is silver, and they deal +1 damage to such creatures. Items whose striking point or surface is not primarily metal are not meaningfully affected. (A longsword or a spear is affected, while a club is not). Magically treated silver weights as much as steel, has hardness 10, and 30 hit points per inch of thickness.

Market Price Modifier: Armor +2,000 shillings; weapon +1,000 shillings.

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House Rules - Expendable Foci

Expendable Foci (from Path of Magic)

Power is the currency of magic. Even the greatest of wizards runs out of it eventually, leaving him unable to toss even the simplest of spells. While scrolls, potions, rings, and wands are all a great help, very few of them are able to assist the mage with what can be one of the greatest drains upon his magical energy - metamagic.

While metamagic is highly useful, it can also cut deeply into a spellcaster's available spell slots. Is it worth maximizing fireball if it reduces your overall number of spells? For wizards, more than sorcerers, the dilemma lies in preparation. Without knowing the dangers he is going to face in a given day, a wizard may hamstring himself by relying too heavily on metamagic and restricting the range of spells available for his use. The sorcerer is not out of the woods, either, because metamagic increases the casting time of his spells, preventing their use when the caster is pressed for time.

The expendable focus is the answer to these problems. Charged with magical energy, it can be used to release that energy to power metamagic. By relieving the drain on a spellcaster's personal energies, the focus allows the spellcaster to use whenever it is needed, without depleting his spell slots.

In this post, a system for creating these expendable foci is presented, along with information on their use.

Focus Types
There are four types of foci: Rings, talismans, potions, and culinary ashe. Rings are by far the most flexible type. A ring contains only generic energy which can be used to fuel a variety of different metamagic applications. Talismans are more restricted, as their energy is focused to provide only a single type of benefit. Potions and culinary ashe are even more inflexible, as the energy they contain may only be used for a single purpose and each potion or culinary ashe can only be used a single time.

Using a Focus
A focus is, in the most general terms, a receptacle of magical energy. Using a focus is a simple matter of releasing the energy it contains, then harnessing that energy for use in spellcasting. When handled properly, this energy is used to power metamagic feats, relieving the spellcaster from the need to expend spell slots for these augmented powers. Unfortunately, using an expendable focus is not always a sure thing and can lead to some unexpected results for the careless or novice user.

Using a Ring
In order to use the energy contained within an expendable focus ring, it must be worn while the command word is spoken. activating a ring focus is a standard action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity. The energy, once released, must be used to augment a spell cast in the next round in order to avoid losing the power and possibly starting a manafire (see below). A ring may be used until the energy it contains is completely expended, at which point the ring crumbles to dust immediately.

Using a Talisman
The talisman is a simple magical item, typically worn on a chain around the caster's neck. The talisman is activated by wearing it and speaking a command word. Activating a talisman is a standard action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity. as with a ring, the energy released from a talisman must be used during the following round to augment a spell in order to avoid losing the energy and starting a manafire. A talisman can only be used until the energy it contains is completely expended, at which point it crumbles to dust immediately.

Using a Potion or Culinary Ashe
The expendable focus potions or culinary ashe are good only for a single use - drinking them is a standard action that provokes an attack of opportunity. Once the potion is imbibed, the caster must use the energy released to augment a spell in the following round. Failure to release this energy may cause serious energy to the individual who consumed the potion or culinary ashe.

Using Multiple Expendable Foci
Because each focus can only contain a certain amount of magical energy, there are times when it is beneficial to release power from more than one item. The limitation is the time factor - releasing energy from a focus is a standard action, which severely limits the number of levels that can be released each round.

As long as the caster is able to control the power he releases (see Manafire, below), there is no limit to the number of foci from which he may draw power. as more energy is released, more time passes, and the power becomes increasingly dangerous.

Magical Energy
The benefit of an expendable focus is the nature of the energy it contains. Unlike a scroll, potion, or most other magic items, the expendable focus is a simple repository for magical energy. This energy is measured in levels, and the number of levels of energy contained within an expendable focus determines its usefulness.

When the energy is released from an expendable focus, it is immediately available for use by the creature that releases it. The energy can only be used to power a metamagic enhancement that the creature that released it is applying to a spell or spell-like ability.

For every level by which a metamagic enhancement raises the spell slot of a spell, the spellcaster requires a level of power from the expendable focus. This is modified by the lvele of the spell being cast: Add one-half the spell's level, rounded down, to the above amount to determine the number of levels that must be extracted from the expendable focus. Because this energy is released before the spell is cast, the level of the spell is always its base level, not its level modified by metamagic such as Heighten Spell.

As an example, a spellcaster that wishes to use the Enlarge Spell feat (which increases the required spell slot level for the spell by one) on a fireball (a 3rd-level spell). The caster would have to draw one spell level from the focus to pay for the Enlarge Spell effect, and one spell level for fireball's level (one-half of three, rounded down). To successfully cast the enlarged fireball, then, the caster must withdraw two levels of energy from his expendable focus.

Manafire
When energy is released from an expendable focus, it suffuses the air around the caster (or the caster herself in the case of a potion or culinary ashe) with magical energy. This power is very unstable and, unless used quickly, has the potential to react violently with the mundane atmosphere. Such unfortunate happenings are dubbed manafire, and are often quite deadly.

Whenever energy is released from an expendable focus, it must be used to provide the power for a metamagic enhancement before the end of the next round. If it is not used, the spellcaster must attempt to retain control over the power so that it does not erupt into a burst of manafire. This requires a Concentration check of DC 10 + (1 per level of energy released x 1 per round since the energy was released), which may be performed as a free action. If the check is successful, the energy remains around (or within) the caster, a volatile mix of power just waiting to explode.

If the caster adds more energy to the previously released power, only one Concentration check is made each round - the DC is based on the total number of levels currently awaiting use and the total number of rounds since the first energy was released. While it is possible to release a considerable amount of energy using multiple foci, doing so is only for the skilled or foolhardy. Characters with inadequate Concentration skill will find themselves failing rather quickly, and then find themselves at the mercy of manafire.

When a Concentration check fails, the result is a blast of manafire that roars through the caster. The spellcaster must immediately make a Will save (DC 15 + 1 for every level of energy released but not used) when manafire erupts. If this save fails, the spellcaster suffers one hit point of damage per level of energy released but not used, and is stunned for 1d4 rounds from the disorienting rush of exploding power.

If the manafire is caused, even if only in part, by spell levels released from the drinking of one or more potions or the consumption of one or more culinary ashe, the damage is much more severe. If the Will save (DC as above) is failed, the spellcaster immediately suffers 1d4 hit points of damage per energy level released but not used and is stunned for 1d6 rounds.

Casters who fall unconscious as a result of manafire damage lose all spellcasting ability for the day, just as if they had expended all of their available spell slots or prepared spells.

Creating an Expendable Focus
An expendable focus is much simpler to create than a standard magic item. It does not create an effect, but simply stores energy that can be used by spellcasters in very specific ways. Unlike a magical sword of suit of armor, the expendable focus can be created with few tools and requires more time and effort than material components.

These items can be created with equipment no more sophisticated than a small fire, and the ingredients and materials required are quire common and available in any town with more than 1,000 or so inhabitants. The creator will benefit from more refined surroundings: If the focus is created in a laboratory, the crafter will gain a +2 circumstance bonus to all rolls made while creating an expendable focus.

Note: The item creation feats Economical Charge and Focus Mastery, although not required for crafting expendable foci, do make crafting such items easier and less expensive.

Creating an Expendable Ring Focus
As the most flexible type of expendable focus, rings require more preparation time and a greater investment of materials than the other types. To create an expendable ring focus, the crafter must have the Forge Ring feat and must follow the steps below.

# of LevelsRequired Value
110
240
390
4160
5250
6360
7490
8640
9810
101,000
# of Enabled FeatsValue Multiplier
1x1
2x1.5
3x2
4x2.5
Acquire the Ring: The value of the ring is crucial to the overall capacity of the focus it becomes. Use the following charts to determine how valuable the ring must be in order to contain the desired magical energies. Any attempt to store more energy in a ring than its value allows automatically fails.

Note that the value of the ring is first calculated based on the levels of energy it can hold,. The value of the ring is then multiplied based on the number of different metamagic applications the ring can be used to power. The more versatile the expendable focus is, the more expensive it is to create. The spellcaster creating the ring must be able to use the metamagic enhancement he wishes to enable the ring to power. Without the knowledge of how the metamagic works, the creator cannot create a focus to fuel it.

The actual composition of the ring is unimportant. A plain copper ring is often used for a small expendable focus, while gem encrusted rings of gold are common for the most powerful expendable foci.

Treat the Ring: Before a ring can absorb magical energies, the spellcaster must treat the item with his own life energy, with many creators using their own blood for this process. This process binds the focus to its creator. For every level of energy contained within the focus, the spellcaster must sacrifice one hit point. This hit point will not heal until the ring focus is destroyed, as it is necessary to contain the magical energy within the ring. The process of treating the ring requires one hour per hit point sacrificed, and always succeeds.

Charge the Ring: After a ring is treated, it is ready to accept the magical energy it is going to store. A treated ring will remain ready to accept energy for a year and a day after it is treated. If it is not charged within that time, it becomes nothing more than a normal ring and the hit points sacrificed by its creator begin to heal as normal.

Charging the ring requires a variable amount of time to complete, based in part on the number of levels to be stored and in part on the skill of the creator. The creator focuises his mental energies on the ring, striving to infuse it with a fraction of his own power. The process is not without danger, however, nor is success guaranteed.

Once the spellcaster begins the process of charging the ring, he must push through to the end. At the end of every hour of the process, the creator must make a DC 20 Spellcraft check. If he succeeds, one level of magical energy is stored within the focus.

The spellcaster may continue this process for up to eight hours without penalty. For every additional hour, however, the DC of the spellcraft check increases by one. If the creator fails three of these checks in a row, the process ends as he collapses into an exhausted stupor. Spellcasters who exhaust themselves in this way are considered stunned for a full 24 hours, after which they are able to resume activity as normal.

Whenever a spellcaster stops the charging process, either voluntarily of because he collapses from the strain, the focus is considered complete.

Creating an Expendable Talisman Focus
# of LevelsRequired Value
120
240
360
480
5100
6120
7140
8160
9180
10200
To create an expendable talisman focus, the crafter must have the Craft Wondrous Item feat. The steps for crafting a talisman are the same as for crafting a ring, with the following exceptions:

The talisman used to create the focus must have a value based on the number of levels of energy it can contain, as shown in the chart to the right.

A talisman can only fuel one metamagic power, decided upon at the time of its creation. The talisman's creator must be able to use the metamagic ability at the time the talisman is created.

The time required to treat the talisman is equal to one hour for every two levels of stored energy.

Creating an Expendable Potion or Culinary Ashe Focus
Potions and culinary ashe are the lest expensive, easiest to create foci, because they are so limited in scope. The creator must have the Brew Potion or Culinary Ashe feat. Creating an expendable potion or culinary ashe focus works the same as creating an expendable ring focus, with the following exceptions:
  • The raw materials needed for creating this type of focus is readily available - it is the spellcaster's blood that provides the magical spark necessary to store the energy within the potion. The materials do have a cost, however, and a crafter must spend 10 shillings per level of energy the potion or culinary ashe will contain to acquire these components.

  • A potion or culinary ashe can only fuel one metamagic enhancement, decided upon at the time of its creation. The creator must be able to use the metamagic at the time the potion or culinary ashe is created. In addition, the potion or culinary ashe may only hold enough energy to fuel the chosen feat a single time. Because the amount of energy required to power a metamagic effect is partly dependent upon the level of the spell the feat affects, the creator must determine at the time the potion or culinary ashe is made what level of spells it will be used to augment

    The potion or culinary ashe can then only be used to augment spells of that level. If it is consumed when the spellcaster has no spells of the proper level or higher available, the potion immediately erupts into manafire, as detailed above. The spellcaster is still allowed the Will save to prevent the damage to himself, but is not allowed a Concentration check to attempt to contains the blaze.

  • The time needed to treat the potion is equal to one hour for every three levels of stored energy.
Creating an Expendable Focus That Can Be Used by Others
In general, an expendable focus is only useful for the mage that creates it. Other casters cannot release the energy it contains unless special measures are taken.

The creator of an expendable focus can, at the time the item is created, spend a few more gold (and some experience) in lieu of using his own life force to power the focus. The following changes are necessary to create an expendable focus that can be used by another spellcaster:
  • The cost of the focus it tripled, as more exotic materials and more elaborate preparations are required.

  • The focus must be created in a magical workshop. While a normal expendable focus can be created with nothing more than a fire and a handful of easily obtainable items, an expendable focus that can be used by others requires a great deal more care to create.

  • Instead of sacrificing his blood, the creator must instead sacrifice 50 experience points for every level of energy contained within the focus.
Other than the above changes, the process for creating an expendable focus useful to all casters is the same as the process for creating a normal expendable focus. Note that even though the creator of an expendable focus may have the ability to use the relevant metamagic abilities, the user of the expendable focus must also have that same ability to use the relevant metamagic ability to be able to gain the benefit of the power of the focus. If a spellcaster without the relevant ability attempts to use an expendable focus, it will immediately erupt into manafire, as detailed above. The spellcaster is still allowed the Will save to prevent the damage to himself, but is not allowed a Concentration check to attempt to contains the blaze.

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