Wednesday, August 7, 2019

House Rules - Clothing and Accessories

Outfit
Source
Cost
Weight
Animal training outfit
A&EG
10 shillings
10 lbs.
Beekeeper's outfit
A&EG
9 shillings
4 lbs.
Bodysuit, black
A&EG
30 shillings
1 lb.
Desert travel garb
T:BE
3 shillings
4 lbs.
Fur clothing
FB
8 shillings
10 lbs.
Heatsuit outfit
A&EG
20 shillings
15 lbs.
Hydration suit
SS
1,000 shillings
10 lbs.
Oilskin suit
SW
10 shillings
10 lbs.
Spelunker's outfit
A&EG
5 shillings
9 lbs.
Swimming gear
SFHB
100 shillings
2 lbs.
Clothing Item
Source
Cost
Weight
Apron, leather
A&EG
3 pennies
2 lbs.
Blouse, cotton
RR:E
5 bits
-
Blouse, linen
RR:E
2 pennies
-
Blouse, silk
RR:E
6 shillings
-
Blouse, velvet
RR:E
12 shillings
-
Boots, high leather
A&EG
5 pennies
1 lb.
Boots, hip/wading
A&EG
1 shillings
3 lbs.
Boots, low leather
A&EG
3 pennies
½ lb.
Boots, riding
A&EG
1 shilling
1 lb.
Boots, smuggler's
A&EG
10 shillings
1 lb.
Breeches, cotton
RR:E
1 penny
1 lb.
Breeches, leather
RR:E
8 pennies
1½ lbs.
Breeches, linen
RR:E
4 pennies
-
Breeches, sackcloth
RR:E
5 bits
1 lb.
Breeches, silk
A&EG
8 shillings
-
Breeches, velvet
RR:E
6 shillings
1 lb.
Breeches, wool
RR:E
5 pennies
1 lb.
Bustle
A&EG
5 shillings
1 lb.
Cap, cotton
A&EG
8 bits
-
Cap, wool
A&EG
1 penny
-
Cape, wool
RR:E
2 pennies
3 lbs.
Cape, leather
RR:E
1 shilling
4 lbs.
Cape, velvet
RR:E
20 shillings
4 lbs.
Cloak, cotton
A&EG
3 pennies
2 lbs.
Cloak, forester's
A&EG
20 shillings
3 lbs.
Cloak, fur
A&EG
20+ shillings
6 lbs.
Cloak, wool
A&EG
5 pennies
3 lbs.
Corset
A&EG
25 shillings
4 lbs.
Dress, cotton
RR:E
7 bits
3 lbs.
Dress, exqiuisite
A&EG
75 shillings
10 lbs.
Dress, linen
RR:E
3 pennies
3 lbs.
Dress, silk
RR:E
10 shillings
2 lbs.
Dress, velvet
RR:E
20 shillings
8 lbs.
Dress, wool
RR:E
2 pennies
5 lbs.
Fez
A&EG
1 penny
-
Fullcloth, winter
A&EG
4 shillings
2 lbs.
Girdle
A&EG
6 pennies
1 lb.
Gloves, ladies' cotton
RR:E
5 pennies
-
Gloves, ladies' lace
RR:E
12 shillings
-
Gloves, ladies' leather
RR:E
5 pennies
-
Gloves, ladies' linen
RR:E
2 pennies
-
Gloves, ladies' silk
RR:E
15 shillings
-
Gloves, ladies' wool
RR:E
1 penny
-
Gloves, men's cotton
RR:E
5 pennies
-
Gloves, men's leather
RR:E
1 penny
-
Gloves, men's linen
RR:E
2 pennies
-
Gloves, men's wool
RR:E
1 penny
-
Gown, cotton
RR:E
1 penny
3 lbs.
Gown, linen
RR:E
3 pennies
3 lbs.
Gown, silk
RR:E
17 shillings
2 lbs.
Gown, velvet
RR:E
35 shillings
8 lbs.
Gown, wool
RR:E
5 pennies
5 lbs.
Hat, bicorne
SW
50 shillings
1 lb.
Hat, broad-brimmed
A&EG
8 pennies
-
Hat, fur-trimmed
A&EG
15 pennies
-
Hat, men's leather
RR:E
6 bits
-
Hat, men's velvet
RR:E
6 shillings
-
Hat, tricorne
SW
15 pennies
1 lb.
Hood, cotton
A&EG
5 bits
-
Hood, fur
A&EG
1 shilling
-
Hood, wool
A&EG
8 bits
-
Hooded cloak, ladies' velvet
RR:E
25 shillings
3 lbs.
Hooded cloak, ladies' wool
RR:E
2 shillings
3 lbs.
Jacket, cotton
A&EG
6 pennies
2 lbs.
Jacket, fur
A&EG
50+ shillings
6 lbs.
Jacket, leather
RR:E
1 shilling
3 lbs.
Jacket, silk
A&EG
10 shillings
1 lb.
Jacket, velvet
RR:E
25 shillings
1 lb.
Jacket, wool
RR:E
3 pennies
3 lbs.
Loincloth
A&EG
3 bits
-
Lounging robe, cotton
RR:E
2 pennies
3 lbs.
Lounging robe, silk
RR:E
15 shillings
2 lbs.
Lounging robe, velvet
RR:E
35 shillings
4 lbs.
Nightshirt, silk
A&EG
6 shillings
-
Robe, cotton
RR:E
1 penny
2 lbs.
Robe, desert
A&EG
20 shillings
2 lbs.
Robe, linen
A&EG
1 shilling
2 lbs.
Robe, silk
RR:E
10 shillings
2 lbs.
Robe, velvet
RR:E
30 shillings
3 lbs.
Shawl, cotton
RR:E
4 bits
-
Shawl, lace
RR:E
20 shillings
-
Shawl, linen
RR:E
2 pennies
-
Shawl, silk
RR:E
8 shillings
-
Shawl, velvet
RR:E
12 shillings
-
Shawl, wool
RR:E
2 pennies
-
Shirt, cotton
RR:E
5 pennies
-
Shirt, leather
RR:E
7 pennies
½ lb.
Shirt, linen
RR:E
2 pennies
-
Shirt, silk
RR:E
6 shillings
-
Shirt, velvet
RR:E
12 shillings
½ lb.
Shirt, wool
RR:E
1 penny
-
Shoes, cotton
RR:E
3 pennies
-
Shoes, dancing
A&EG
15 shillings
-
Shoes, leather
RR:E
1 shilling
1 lb.
Shoes, velvet
RR:E
5 shillings
½
Skirt, cotton
RR:E
5 bits
-
Skirt, linen
RR:E
2 pennies
-
Skirt, silk
RR:E
6 shillings
-
Skirt, velvet
RR:E
15 shillings
½ lb.
Skirt, wool
RR:E
1 penny
-
Slippers, leather
RR:E
8 pennies
-
Slippers, velvet
RR:E
10 shillings
-
Surcoat, edged
RR:E
7 pennies
1 lb.
Surcoat, gemmed
RR:E
5 shillings
1 lb.
Surcoat, hemmed
RR:E
5 pennies
1 lb.
Surcoat, metallic thread
RR:E
2 shillings
1 lb.
Surcoat, plain
RR:E
3 pennies
1 lb.
Tabard, edged
RR:E
6 pennies
½ lb.
Tabard, gemmed
RR:E
4 shillings
½ lb.
Tabard, hemmed
RR:E
4 pennies
½ lb.
Tabard, metallic thread
RR:E
1 shilling
½ lb.
Tunic, plain
RR:E
2 pennies
1 lb.
Tunic, cotton
RR:E
4 bits
1 lb.
Tunic, leather
RR:E
6 pennies
2 lbs.
Tunic, linen
RR:E
2 pennies
1 lb.
Tunic, silk
RR:E
5 shillings
½ lb.
Tunic, velvet
RR:E
10 shillings
2 lbs.
Tunic, wool
RR:E
1 penny
1 lb.
Vest, brocade
A&EG
8 shillings
1 lb.
Vest, cotton
RR:E
3 bits
-
Vest, knife
A&EG
25 shillings
2 lbs.
Vest, leather
RR:E
4 pennies
½ lb.
Vest, linen
RR:E
2 pennies
-
Vest, silk
RR:E
3 shillings
-
Vest, velvet
RR:E
6 shillings
1 lb.
Vest, wool
RR:E
1 penny
-
Clothing Accessory
Source
Cost
Weight
Belt, baldric
A&EG
7 pennies
½ lb.
Belt, fine
A&EG
25 shillings
-
Belt, leather
A&EG
2 pennies
-
Buckle, large fancy
A&EG
1+ shillings
-
Buckle, large plain
A&EG
2 pennies
-
Embroidery, basic
RR:E
+2 shillings
-
Embroidery, coat-of-arms
RR:E
+15 shillings
-
Embroidery, custom
RR:E
+20 shillings
-
Embroidery, fancy
RR:E
+10 shillings
-
Fur-lined (bear, wolf)
RR:E
+5 shillings
+½ lb.
Fur-lined (mink, sable)
RR:E
+20 shillings
+½ lb.
Removable sleeves
A&EG
+5 shillings
-
Sash, cotton
A&EG
2 pennies
-
Sash, silk
A&EG
4 shillings
-
Sash, wool
A&EG
1 penny
-
Sheath, boot
A&EG
30 shillings
-
Sheath, wrist
A&EG
20 shillings
-
Spurs, bronze
RR:E
20 shillings
1 lb.
Spurs, gold
RR:E
50 shillings
2 lbs.
Spurs, iron
RR:E
1 shilling
1 lb.
Spurs, silver
RR:E
30 shillings
1 lb.
Spurs, steel
RR:E
10 shillings
1 lb.
Spurs, custom-engraved
RR:E
+20 shillings
-
Spurs, engraved
RR:E
+5 shillings
-
Spurs, gem-encrusted
RR:E
+50 shillings
-
Spurs, gilded gold
RR:E
+5 shillings
-
Spurs, gilded silver
RR:E
+1 shilling
-
Stockings
A&EG
4 pennies
-
Supenders
A&EG
8 bits
-
This list uses several abbreviations to show what sourcebook the entries were drawn from. For guidance as to what sourcebooks these abbreviations reference, see my key to Sourcebook Abbreviations.

Outfits

All of the outfit packages contained in the Player's Handbook are available for purchase. Character's who wish to purchase one of those outfit packages are certainly free to do so. In addition, the following outfits can be purchased:

Animal Training Outfit: Essentially beefed up padded armor, this suit covers a person from head to toe in thick quilted padding, especially around the limbs. It is used as protection by those who specialize in training attack animals such as dogs. It is very difficult to move in this outfit, so it does not make for good armor. Used as armor, it has the following statistics: Armor bonus +2, maximum Dexterity bonus +1, armor check penalty -7, arcane spell failure chance 40%, speed 20 feet (30 feet)/15 feet (20 feet).

Beekeeper's Outfit: This outfit prevents damage from ordinary vermin of all kinds: Bees, ants, centipedes, and so on. The outfit consists of a sealed leather suit and large helmet encased in fine netting. The outfit grants a +6 armor bonus to Armor Class against attacks from stinging and biting creatures that are size Fine. It provides no protection against larger creatures.

Bodysuit, Black: This very light-fitting garment is made of black silk. It is used by rogues and infiltrators when sneaking around at night. Wearing the suit grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Hide checks in conditions dark enough to grant one-half concealment or better. The bodysuit provides no benefit if you wear clothing or armor other than belts, pouches, or bandoleers on top of it.

Desert Traveler's Outfit: Light, layered clothing to protect against the sun without being too heavy, plus a thick, wool cloak for protection from wind, sand, and cold. This outfit counts as light clothing and offers limited protections against some waste hazards. The protection it offers against heat is negated if the wearer also dons armor.

Fur Clothing: Fur clothing consists of thick layers of animal furs designed to be worn over a regular set of clothing or armor. Wearing fur clothing grants a +5 circumstance bonus to Fortitude saving throws against exposure to cold weather. Fur clothing can be worn over a cold weather outfit, in which case the circumstance bonuses granted by such items stack, grating a total +10 circumstance bonus to Fortitude saving throws against cold weather. Fur clothing is cumbersome to wear. Although the furs do not provide a measurable armor bonus, they do increase your total armor check penalty for any armor worn by 2 points.

Heatsuit Outfit: This is clothing designed to protect the wearer against abysmal heat, such as temperatures found around forges and volcanoes. It consists of heavy pants and coat, a specially treated leather apron, very thick mittens, a thick hood, and goggles. The heatsuit outfit prevents 3 points of normal heat damage per round and eliminates the -4 penalty on Fortitude saves for wearing heavy clothes. A heatsuit outfit should be worn only for a brief period of time.

Hydration Suit: The hydration suit is a masterpiece of water retention, crafted by waste-dwellers with technical skill and unusual materials. Its design allows you to recover nearly all the water your body loses through sweat and exhalation. A hydration suit is made of the skin and tissue of various desert-dwelling beasts and treated with oils or waxes for water retention. It covers your entire body, with a tight-fitting hood over the head and a mask covering the mouth and nose. Inside the mask is a glass plate to collect condensation and a tube fashioned from watertight materials. An inner lining wicks sweat away from your body and collects it in spongelike filtration material that can be removed after you doff the hydration suit. The tube from the face mask twists in loops around your body, through the sponge to reclaim moisture, condensing it in a reservoir from which you can sip. A functioning hydration suit eliminates the need to make Constitution checks to avoid dehydration. It raises the level of protection from heat dangers by two steps and its mask functions as a filter mask. A hydration suit offers no protection from magical desiccation.

Oilskin Suit: Inhabitants of rainy climates and misty seacoasts and those who make their living from the sea need reliable clothing to keep out the dampness and chill. An oilskin suit consists of high boots, heavy trousers, a long coat or cape, and a wide-brimmed hat. These garments are made of heavy-duty cloth such as cotton or linen, then waterproofed with flaxseed oil.

Spelunker's Outfit: This outfit is for adventurers planning to travel underground. It consists of water-resistant wool breeches, low sturdy boots, wool shirt, leather coat, belt, plain buckle, bandoleer for attaching equipment, kneepads, elbow pads, and miner's cap. The outfit does not include climbing gear, which must be purchased separately.

Swimming Gear: Swimming gear consists of webbed paddles that fit over the feet, and webbed gloves for the hands, all made of masterwork quality leather treated with sailor's wax during the tanning process. These treatments make the gear permanently waterproof. Swimming gear grants a +2 circumstance bonus to Swim checks. The movement speed of the character wearing the paddles on land is halved, and Disable Device, Open Lock, and Sleight of Hand checks suffer a -2 circumstance penalty if the character is wearing the webbed gloves, as do any other actions that require manual precision.

Clothing Items

Characters who wish to more specifically purchase their items of clothing, or who wish to equip themselves with fancier outfits can purchase individual items of clothing off the clothing item list.

Boots, Smuggler's: These otherwise normal high boots have hinged heels that swing open to reveal small storage spaces. Each can hold one or two Fine objects, such as a vial of poison. In addition, the inside lining of the boot can be removed to hide thin, flat objects like a map or a slender dagger. It requires a successful DC 30 Search check to locate items hidden in the boots.

Cloak, Forester's: Woven from several pieces of green and brown canvas, these large ponchos aid anyone trying to hide in a forest environment. The carefully chosen colors blend in with the vegetation and the poncho's loose shape obscures the humanoid form. Forester's cloaks provide a +1 circumstance bonus to Hide checks made in a forest.

Fullcloth, Winter: This is a heavily quilted undergarment that is worn underneath regular clothing to protect the wearer against cold. Winter fullcloth is considered part of the cold weather outfit described in the Player's Handbook. If worn by itself, winter fullcloth grants a +1 circumstance bonus to Fortitude saving throws against exposure to cold weather.

Hat, Bicorne: A bicorne is a semicircular hat usually worn by captains and admirals. it is braided and showy, the better to call out the high rank of its wearer.

Hat, Tricorne: A tricorne is the classic three-cornered hat. It is generally worn by the upper classes and can be both civilian and military garb. A tricorne can range from a simple leather or felt version to a very fancy silk item with feathers. The price given here is for a well-made felt tricorne.

Robes, Desert: These loose-light colored robes offer some protection against the effects of heat. They provide a +2 circumstance bonus on Fortitude saving throws against exposure to high temperatures. Desert robes offer no protection against either mundane or magical fire.
Vest, Knife: This specially designed vest is worn over other clothing and can comfortably hold up to ten daggers across the chest. It is particularly handy for knife-throwers with the Quick Draw feat.

In addition to the specific benefits certain items of specialized clothing provide, clothing in most of the Three Worlds generally serves as an indicator of social status and in many cases as an indicator of loyalty. Wearing the proper clothes for the proper situation can be critical. A character who appears in their adventuring gear when meeting a duke or a prince is likely making a faux pas that will hinder any efforts they may make to sway the noble's opinion. Those of the upper classes are likely to discount the opinions of those dressed as commoners or lower classes - often regarding them as simple bumpkins not worthy of concern. In extreme cases, members of the nobility will treat commoners with disdain and barely concealed disgust.

Just as wearing common clothes in certain setting will work against an individual, wearing expensive or upper class clothing in the wrong situations can also cause problems. Those who are finely dressed will likely be regarded as potential marks in rougher parts of the world, or may be regarded by many with envy or fear. A man who shows up in fine clothing in a seaside bar is likely to get laughed at unless he also brings several armed men with him.

Depending on the situation, clothing can help or hinder an individual in social situations. Social skills can, and often will be affected by the clothing a character chooses to wear: Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, and Sense Motive checks can be aided or hampered by a character's choice of outfit, potentially providing a +2 bonus or a -2 penalty to the check. Disguise and Perform checks can also be affected in the right circumstance, providing similar bonuses or penalties.

Knights and nobles will almost always wear clothing decorated with their personal coat of arms, as will their retainers and followers. Soldiers wear clothing indicating who they serve, and often, in what capacity. While military uniforms per se are not commonly used, the clothing worn by military men while on campaign will leave little doubt as to whom they have sworn their loyalty. Even while on military campaigns, the clothing worn by soldiers differentiates them by social standing: Common soldiers wear plain tabards stamped with their liege's insignia, while knights wear hemmed or edged surcoats with embroidered coats of arms. Nobles at war wear embossed armor and surcoats woven with metallic threads, while royalty often attired themselves in gilded armor and clothing of the finest fabrics. Knights on campaign or at tournaments commonly wear lounging robes. These are very similar to normal robes, but cut much larger and fastened not only with a belt at the waist but with a tie or fine chain near the neck. A knight can pull his lounging robe on over his armor so that he can entertain guests in his tent without appearing barbaric, but also without taking the time to remove his armor completely.

The average male peasant or commoner typically wears a simple outfit, consisting of trousers, boots, and a shirt or tunic. During cooler weather, a vest or jacket is added, and the pants and shirt are made from thicker material (wool or leather instead of cotton) while the boots are fur-lined. Cloaks may also be worn over everything else. Women of this class generally wear loose skirts and cotton blouses or simple dresses - adding shawls or cloaks in cold weather. Most fabric is undyed or in the earth tones provided by the cheapest homemade dyes.

More affluent men often wear a cape over their shirt, and frequently have a light vest of embroidered material. Those who work indoors occasionally wear low boots or shoes instead of the stiffer, sturdier outdoor boots. Gloves and hats complete these outfits. Women wear gowns and dresses rather than skirts, with a cape or shawl thrown over the shoulders and gloves to protect their hands from getting dirty.

Men in the employ of nobles wear either a tabard or a surcoat over their normal clothes. A tabard is simply a rectangular piece of cloth with a hole cut for the head and neck. It is worn over the shoulders, so that it covers both front and back, and is usually fastened with a belt. The sides are completely open, and the garment has no sleeves. These items have a coat of arms either dyed or stitched onto them, both front and back, and edges are often hemmed in a different color - fancier tabards have edging of a different material, such as velvet or fur. Surcoats are similar except that they are split down the front, and so resemble a long vest - most surcoats reach to the knee. These bear a coat of arms across the back, and a smaller copy of the same insignia on the left breast. Surcoats are not fastened, and simply hang loose, like a sleeveless robe. Having an image dyed into the cloth is by far the least expensive option, but also produces an image with slightly blurry edges, and one capable of fading with wear. Embroidery is cleaner, sharper, and more durable, but more expensive, particularly for more detailed coats of arms.

Within their own home, nobles often wear robes - these simple, belted items are most often made of linen, silk, or fine cotton, though heavier winter robes might be fur-lined wool or simply fur. Nobles can often afford fabrics colored with more expensive dyes that provide rich jewel-tones.

Noblemen wear the same type of clothing as merchants and townsmen - pants, shirt, vest, cape - but the material are finer. Their clothing is made of linen or silk or velvet rather than cotton and wool, and often has fur or velvet or metallic thread for a border, along with embroidery at the cuffs and neckline. Noblemen often wear low boots of soft leather, which are useless in mud or dirt, but fine for cobbled streets or marble floors. All of their clothing has their coat of arms embroidered into it somewhere, and the wealthier nobles have precious metals and stones woven in as decorations as well - kings and princes sometimes wear tunics of cloth-of-gold, or vests completely encrusted in gems.

Noblewomen wear gowns and dresses, but their clothing is also of finer material and more detailed workmanship than those of lower status. Their gowns may have gathered bodices and pleated or ruffled skirts made of silk, velvet, satin, or brocade with lace trim. Slashed sleeves show patterned or embroidered material beneath, and the same material might fill the area between the neckline and the actual neck of the garment, which often ends in a choker. Gloves are worn and low soft slippers. Embroidered or lace shawls drape over the shoulders. In winter, a noblewoman might also wear a large fur-lined cloak with a hood.

Clothing Accesories

Sheath, Boot: A boot sheath is easily concealed, making it useful for those who want to appear unarmed. Booth sheaths can hold only Small or Tiny bladed weapons. Characters attempting to conceal an item in a boot sheat gain a +4 bonus on their Sleight of Hand check (opposed by either Spot or Search depending on the situation). If the character using the boot sheath has no ranks in Sleight of Hand, noticing the boot sheath requires a DC 10 Spot or Search check.

Sheath, Wrist: This sheath fits along the inside of the forearm, allowing weapons stored inside it to be drawn quickly. A wrist sheath can hold one Tiny weapon such as a dagger, or a wand. Weapons of unusual shape, such as a bladed gauntlet, do not fit into a wrist sheath regardless of their size. Drawing or replacing the contents of a wrist sheath is a move-equivalent action.

Spurs: Spurs could be regarded as mount-related gear, and are often worn with armor. Spurs are metal devices shaped like a "U" but with an extra prong extending from the bottom of the curve. They are worn about the ankles, so that the prong sticks straight back and is parallel to the ground. Leather straps attached to the front edges fasten around the foot to hold the spur in place, and the back prong ends in a sharp point, or a group of points resembling a caltrop, or even a small spiked wheel. Riders wear spurs and use them to goad their horses to a gallop by digging the point of the sput into the animal's side. These devices are a symbol of horsemanship, even though good riders pride themselves on never having to apply their spurs. Because knights and nobles are expected to be expert horsemen, spurs are associated with knighthood as well, and each new knight receives a pair along with his sword and shield. They are also common prized for riding competitions, and for riding-related elements of tourneys. Knights and nobles take great pride in their spurs, and often have a pair custom-made. Most spurs are made of steel or iron, but they are often engraved with designs or crests, and may be gilded with gold or silver - the wealthiest nobles might have spurs of solid silver or solid gold, though these are less practical than decorative. Some also have gems set into them, making the spurs as much jewelry as equipment.

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Monday, August 5, 2019

Campaign Design - Base Classes: Cleric

Cleric
(adapted from the Player's Handbook and Path of Faith)

The handiwork of the Lords of Heaven and the Lords of Hell is everywhere - in places of natural beauty, in mighty crusades, in soaring temples, and in the hearts of worshipers. Like people, the divine and internal powers run the gamut from benevolent to malicious, reserved to intrusive, simple to inscrutable. The celestial and demonic powers work mostly through intermediaries - their clerics. Good clerics protect and avenge. Evil clerics pillage and destroy. A cleric uses the power of his patron to make their divine or infernal will manifest.

In the Three Worlds campaign, a cleric must select one of the Lords of Heaven or Lords of Hell as their patron. Unlike in the base rules, clerics may not be devoted to an ethos or principle rather than a specific deity. All clerics in the Three Worlds campaign must be devoted to a specific deity, church, or cult. Note that in the Three Worlds campaign, player characters may not be evil, and as a result are prohibited from being clerics devoted to most of the Lords of Hell.

Abilities: Wisdom determines how powerful a spell a cleric can cast, how many spells he can cast per day, and how hard those spells are to resist. A high Constitution score improves a cleric's hit points, and a high Charisma score improves his abilities to turn creatures opposed to his ethos.
Alignment: A cleric’s alignment must be within one step of his deity’s (that is, it may be one step away on either the lawful-chaotic axis or the good-evil axis, but not both). A cleric may not be neutral unless his deity’s alignment is also neutral.
Hit Die: d8.
Luck Die: d3.

Class Skills
  • Skill List: The cleric's class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con), Craft: Any (all skills taken individually) (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Heal (Wis), Knowledge: Arcana (Int), Knowledge: History (Int), Knowledge: Religion (Int), Knowledge: the Planes (Int), Profession: Any (all skills taken individually) (Wis), and Spellcraft (Int).
  • Note: Because the Three Worlds campaign uses the Skills by Character house rule, the list of class skills given here is only included for the sake of completeness, and is not used by characters in the campaign setting.
  • Skill Points at 1st Level: (2 + Intelligence modifier) x4.
  • Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + Intelligence modifier.
Class Features
All of the following are the class features of the cleric:
  • Base Attack Bonus: Average. A cleric gains +¾ base attack bonus per class level.

  • Base Fortitude Save Bonus: Good. A cleric gains a +2½ base Fortitude save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Fortitude save bonus per class level.

  • Base Reflex Save Bonus: Good. A cleric gains a +2½ base Reflex save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Reflex save bonus per class level.

  • Base Will Save Bonus: Good. A cleric gains a +2½ base Will save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Will save bonus per class level.

  • Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Clerics are proficient with all simple weapons, with light, medium, and heavy armor, and with shields (except tower shields).

  • Spells: A cleric casts divine spells, which are drawn from the cleric/favored soul spell list. However, his alignment may restrict him from casting certain spells opposed to his moral or ethical beliefs; see Chaotic, Evil, Good, and Lawful Spells. A cleric must choose and prepare his spells in advance. To prepare or cast a spell, a cleric must have a Wisdom score equal to at least 10 + the spell level. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a cleric’s spell is 10 + the spell level + the cleric’s Wisdom modifier. Like other spellcasters, a cleric can cast only a certain number of spells of each spell level per day. His base daily spell allotment is given on the table below. In addition, he receives bonus spells per day if he has a high Wisdom score. A cleric also gets one domain spell of each spell level he can cast, starting at 1st level. When a cleric prepares a spell in a domain spell slot, it must come from one of his two chosen domains. Clerics meditate or pray for their spells. Each cleric must choose a time at which he must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation or supplication to regain his daily allotment of spells. Time spent resting has no effect on whether a cleric can prepare spells. A cleric may prepare and cast any spell on the cleric spell list, provided that he can cast spells of that level, but he must choose which spells to prepare during his daily meditation.

  • Aura (Ex): A cleric of a chaotic, evil, good, or lawful deity has a particularly powerful aura corresponding to the deity’s alignment (see the detect evil spell for details).

  • Deity, Domains, and Domain Spells: A cleric’s deity influences his alignment, what magic he can perform, his values, and how others see him. A cleric chooses two domains from among those belonging to his deity, as found on the list of cleric domains. A cleric can select an alignment domain (Chaos, Evil, Good, or Law) only if his alignment matches that domain. Each domain gives the cleric access to a domain spell at each spell level he can cast, from 1st on up, as well as a granted power. The cleric gets the granted powers of both the domains selected. With access to two domain spells at a given spell level, a cleric prepares one or the other each day in his domain spell slot. If a domain spell is not on the cleric spell list, a cleric can prepare it only in his domain spell slot.

  • Channeled Energy (Su): Clerics have the ability to channel divine energy. Good-aligned clerics (or neutral clerics of a good deity) can channel positive energy. Evil-aligned clerics (or neutral clerics of an evil deity) can channel negative energy. Chaotic-aligned clerics (or neutral clerics of a chaotic deity) can channel entropic energy, and Lawful-aligned clerics (or neutral clerics of a lawful deity) can channel principled energy. A cleric who is true neutral and whose deity is true neutral can choose what type of energy he channels. A cleric can only channel one type of energy, so a cleric who was Lawful Good would need to choose whether he has the ability to channel positive energy or channel principled energy.

  • Spontaneous Casting: A cleric who channels positive energy or principled energy can channel stored spell energy into healing spells that he did not prepare ahead of time. The cleric can "lose" any prepared spell that is not a domain spell in order to cast any cure spell of the same spell level or lower (a cure spell is any spell with "cure" in its name).

    A cleric who channels entropic or negative energy, cannot convert prepared spells to cure spells but can convert them to inflict spells (an inflict spell is one with "inflict" in its name).

  • Chaotic, Evil, Good, and Lawful Spells: A cleric can’t cast spells of an alignment opposed to his own or his deity’s (if he has one). Spells associated with particular alignments are indicated by the chaos, evil, good, and law descriptors in their spell descriptions.

  • Turn or Rebuke (Su): A cleric has the power to affect chaotic, lawful, or undead creatures by channeling the power of his faith through his holy (or unholy) symbol (see Turn or Rebuke Undead).
    • A cleric who channels positive energy can turn or destroy undead creatures.

    • A cleric who channels negative energy can rebuke or command undead creatures.

    • A cleric who channels principled energy can turn or destroy creatures with the Chaos subtype and rebuke or command creatures with the Law subtype.

    • A clerics who channels entropic energy can turn or destroy creatures with the Chaos or Law subtype and rebuke or command creatures with the Chaos subtype. Chaos is as likely to fight itself as it is to fight law.
    A cleric may attempt to turn undead a number of times per day equal to 3 + his Charisma modifier. A cleric with 5 or more ranks in Knowledge: Religion gets a +2 bonus on turning checks.

  • Bonus Languages: A cleric’s bonus language options include Anarchic, Axiomatic, Celestial, and Infernal (the languages of chaotic, lawful, good, and evil outsiders, respectively). These choices are in addition to the bonus languages available to the character because of his race.

  • Ex-Clerics: A cleric who grossly violates the code of conduct required by his god loses all spells and class features, except for armor and shield proficiencies and proficiency with simple weapons. He cannot thereafter gain levels as a cleric of that god until he atones (see the atonement spell description).

Cleric
Spells per Day
Level
Special
0th1st2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8th9th
1st
Aura, Turn or Rebuke
3
1+1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2nd
-
4
2+1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3rd
-
4
2+1
1+1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4th
-
5
3+1
2+1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5th
-
5
3+1
2+1
1+1
-
-
-
-
-
-
6th
-
5
3+1
3+1
2+1
-
-
-
-
-
-
7th
-
6
4+1
3+1
2+1
1+1
-
-
-
-
-
8th
-
6
4+1
3+1
3+1
2+1
-
-
-
-
-
9th
-
6
4+1
4+1
3+1
2+1
1+1
-
-
-
-
10th
-
6
4+1
4+1
3+1
3+1
2+1
-
-
-
-
11th
-
6
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
2+1
1+1
-
-
-
12th
-
6
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
3+1
2+1
-
-
-
13th
-
6
5+1
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
2+1
1+1
-
-
14th
-
6
5+1
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
3+1
2+1
-
-
15th
-
6
5+1
5+1
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
2+1
1+1
-
16th
-
6
5+1
5+1
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
3+1
2+1
-
17th
-
6
5+1
5+1
5+1
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
2+1
1+1
18th
-
6
5+1
5+1
5+1
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
3+1
2+1
19th
-
6
5+1
5+1
5+1
5+1
5+1
4+1
4+1
3+1
3+1
20th
-
6
5+1
5+1
5+1
5+1
5+1
4+1
4+1
4+1
4+1
In addition to the stated number of spells per day for 1st through 9th-level spells, a cleric gets a domain spell for each spell level, starting at 1st. The "+1" in the entries on this table represents that spell. Domain spells are in addition to any bonus spells the cleric may receive for having a high Wisdom score.

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