Friday, September 22, 2017

House Rules - Gutter Mage Spell List

This is an attempt to create a comprehensive spell list for Gutter Mages that includes all of the spells drawn from the various sourcebooks that I own. In some cases, I have added particular spells from third party sourcebooks that I thought were thematically appropriate as expansions to the spell list for this class. For the most part, this list does not include spells that appear in either the Player's Handbook or the Spell Compendium, although I may get around to including them at some point. Spells drawn from sources other than those two volumes are marked with a notation by the spells in question. For guidance as to what sourcebooks these notated abbreviations reference, see my key to Sourcebook Abbreviations.

All of the material contained on this page and other pages of this blog is presented in accordance with the terms of the Open Game License.

0th Level

Arcane Mark (Gutter Mark) (PHB)
Animated Tattoo (BoEM3)
Bat Sight (Blind Eye) (BoRL)
Bouncing Fall (Bounce the Baby) (BoRL)
Create Equipment (Just the Thing) (BoRL)
Daze (Upside the Head) (PHB)
Detect Magic (Finder) (PHB)
Fast Escape (Quicker) (BoRL)
Flare (Flasher) (PHB)
Ghost Sound (Groaner) (PHB)
Guidance (Just a Bit) (PHB)
Long Flame (BoEM3)
Lullaby (Crooner's Chant) (PHB)
Prestidigitation (Fingertips) (PHB)
Read Magic (Gutter Sight) (PHB)
Smuggler's Veil (Empty Pot) (BoRL)
Thief Hand (BoRL) (PHB)
Trinket's Charm (A Coin for Uncle) (BoRL)

1st Level

Beggar's Charm (Fly a Flag) (BoRL)
Card Control (Flip You for It) (BoRL)
Compelling Question (Shakedown) (BoRL)
Confession (I Shouldn't Tell You This) (BoRL)
Disdain the Divine (BoEM2)
Distraction (Screamer) (BoRL)
Dust and Dirt (Not Worth Much) (BoRL)
Expeditious Retreat (Triple Time) (PHB)
Feather Fall (Double Bounce) (PHB)
Gambler's Luck (Sharper) (BoRL)
Guilt (BoEM)
Gutter Storm (BoRL)
Hold Portal (Locker) (PHB)
Hypnotism (Fey Lights) (PHB)
Jump (Higher Step) (PHB)
Mage Armor (Thick Rags) (PHB)
Noness Toma (Slip Between Sight) (BoEM3)
Private Conversation (Just Between Us) (BoRL)
Rattling Chant (BoRL)
Ray of Enfeeblement (Palsy and Shake) (PHB)
Rogue's Stab (BoRL)
Shocking Grasp (Reynard's Handshake) (PHB)
Sleep (Like a Baby) (PHB)
Switch Item (Fool Me Once) (BoRL)
Thieves' Charm (Mine Mine Mine) (BoRL)
Unhand (BoEM2)
Watch the Watchers (BoRL)

2nd Level

Bull's Strength (PHB)
Cat's Grace (PHB)
Charming Lie (Trust Me, Boys) (BoRL)
Cloak of Darkness (Black Gentleman) (BoRL)
Darkness (Out the Light) (PHB)
Darkvision (Rat Sight) (PHB)
False Life (Bigger Boots) (PHB)
Fog Cloud (Morning Sky) (PHB)
Knock (Every Key) (PHB)
Mirror Image (Twins and Triplets) (PHB)
Misdirection (Maze Chant) (PHB)
Part Crowd (Step Aside) (BoRL)
Peerless Camouflage (Running the Shadows) (BoRL)
Play the Fool (BoEM3)
Precise Vision (BoEM)
Roof Runner (BoRL)
Silence (Coffin Chant) (PHB)
Silent as Rats (BoRL)
Silent Combat (Midnight Muffle) (BoRL)
Small as Mice (BoRL)
Step Under My Shadow (BoRL)
Thief Ward (BoEM)
Treasure Magnet (Into the Bag) (BoRL)
Trigger Item (Pull the Lever) (BoRL)

3rd Level

Alikaba's Theft (BoEM3)
Confusion (Ring of Chimes) (PHB)
Deep Slumber (Like a Rock) (PHB)
Deeper Darkness (Out the Stars) (PHB)
Dispel Magic (White Breaker)

Feign Death (Gravedigger's Nap) (BoRL)
Forget (Nothing to See) (BoRL)
Gaseous Form (Foggy Bottom) (PHB)
Glibness (Silvertongue) (PHB)
Grant Mobility (BoEM3)
Greater Sleep (BoEM)
Knockout (Mugged in the Alley) (BoRL)
Nondetection (Blind the Law) (PHB)
One Step Ahead (Spider Eyes) (BoRL)
Quick Escape (Out the Back Way) (BoRL)
Scry Retaliation (BoEM3)
Smuggler's Chest (BoRL)
Spit Shine (Pretty Pebble) (BoRL)
Storm of Ten Thousand Knives (Dagger Chant) (BoRL)
Unreasonable Rage (Mad as a Hare) (BoRL)

4th Level

Black Spellbreaker (Black Blade) (BoRL)
Coax Forth Power (BoEM2)
Freedom of Movement (Nothing Holds Us) (PHB)
Giant Vermin (Crawlers) (PHB)
Greater Quick Escape (Open Every Window) (BoRL)
Greater Treasure Magnet (I Said into the Bag, Dammit) (BoRL)
Hidden Object (BoEM)
Modify Memory (What He Really Saw) (PHB)
Scrying (My Little Eye) (PHB)
Sending (Hawks and Pigeons) (PHB)
Spelltrap (BoEM)
Thief of Spells (Borrow a Cup of Magic) (BoRL)
Transfer Curse (My Gift to You) (BoRL)
Zone of Silence (Really Just Between Us) (PHB)

Home     Class Spell Lists    Base Classes     Gutter Mage

General Rules - Luck Feats

This is a list of Luck feats most of which are derived from the Book of Roguish Luck or Complete Scoundrel. They are all tied to the Luck System, and give players the ability to add to their Luck pool, manipulate their Luck points, or use their Luck points in additional ways. Changelings may take Luck feats as racial bonus feats. As feats get added to my ongoing campaigns, I will endeavor to add more to this listing.

All or Nothing [Changeling, Luck](adapted from the D&D Wiki, created by Leziad)
You benefit from a ridiculous amount luck for one action, or suffer from a ridiculous amount of bad luck.
   Prerequisites: One other Luck feat.
   Benefit: Before you make the initial roll, you can spend a luck point on an attack roll, or skill check or two luck points on a saving throw. If you do you roll 3d20s instead of one and take the best result. However if the final result is 10 or lower you become dazed causing your action to fail. Rolls affected by this feat cannot be altered by luck rerolls or class features allowing further rerolling.
   Special: Unlike most other uses of luck points, this feat uses luck points prior to the initial roll.

Bastard Luck [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
You can permanently turn hit points into luck points.
   Benefit: You permanently lose a number of hit points equal to your current character level and gain twice as many luck points. The luck points gained cannot increase your luck points beyond your maximum.
   Special: You can take this feat more than once. Its effects stack.

Better Lucky than Good [Luck, Changeling](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
You can succeed where others would surely fail.
   Prerequisites: Character Level 6th+, any two other Luck feats.
   Benefit: If you roll a natural 1 when making an attack roll, you can expend one luck point as a swift action to instead treat the roll as a natural 20. You can use this feat once per day.

Born Lucky [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
Your luck replenishes itself quickly.
   Prerequisite: Fortune's Child.
   Benefit: You regain 1d4 luck points per game session. If this number causes you to exceed your maximum luck, any points beyond your maximum are lost.
   Normal: You gain additional luck points once per level.

Burn Luck [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
You can use luck to succeed automatically on a save instead of attempting a saving throw.
   Benefit: Whenever a save is called for, you have the option to burn luck points instead of rolling. You must declare your intent to use this option before rolling the save. To use this feat, roll 1d6 and subtract the resulting number of points from your luck pool. If this reduction leaves you with at least 1 luck point, you automatically succeed at the saving throw. If this reduction leaves you with 0 luck points of a negative number, the save automatically fails.

Cheat Death [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
You are hard to kill.
   Prerequisite: Fortune's Child.
   Benefit: You can spend 3 luck points to negate a confirmed critical hit. The attack still deals normal damage, but the critical hit is no longer confirmed.

Critting Spree [Changeling, Luck](adapted from the D&D Wiki, created by Eiji-kun)
Your luck in hitting your opponents is contagious.
   Prerequisite: One other Luck feat.
   Benefit: When you confirm a critical hit on a creature, you may expend a luck point to give all your allies a luck bonus on their critical threat range and critical confirmation rolls. The bonus is as given below, and is based on the critical multiplier of our weapon:

Critical MultiplierThreat Range BonusConfirmation Roll Bonus
x2
+1
+2
x3
+2
+4
x4
+3
+6

Weapons with higher critical multipliers give correspondingly higher bonuses. The bonus lasts for 1 round.

Even Luckier Than Before [Changeling, Luck](adapted from the D&D Wiki, created by Eiji-kun)
You are even luckier than other lucky people.
   Prerequisites: One other Luck feat or the Fortune Domain.
   Benefit: Whenever you use a luck point to reroll, the reroll gains a +2 luck bonus.

Evil Eye [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
You can ruin other people's luck.
   Prerequisites: Fortune's Child, Charisma 13+.
   Benefit: You can negate an opponent's luck roll by spending 1 of your own luck points.

Fortuitous Strike [Changeling, Luck](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
You can hit a foe in just the right place.
   Prerequisites: Character Level 6th+, one other Luck feat.
   Benefit: You can expend one luck point as a swift action to reroll a weapon damage roll.

Fortunate Fumble [Changeling, Luck](adapted from the D&D Wiki, created by Leziad)
You can stumble your way into hitting your foe.
   Prerequisite: BAB +1
   Benefit: If you roll a natural 1 on an attack roll, you may expend 2 luck points to automatically hit dealing half weapon damage (but no damage from other sources of damage are applied).

Fortune's Child [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
You are lucky.
   Benefit: You gain +3 luck points and increase your maximum luck by 3 points as well.
   Normal: You gain luck points only from the roll of your Luck Die.
   Special: You can take this feat more than once. Its effects stack.

Fortune's Smile [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
Lódur smiles on your misfortune and you dodge the worst of many dangers.
   Prerequisite: Fortune's Child.
   Benefit: You may reroll a saving throw by spending 1 luck point. You must take the result of the second roll.
   Normal: You must spend 2 luck points to reroll a save.

Good Karma [Changeling, Luck](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
You can use your luck to aid an ally - at the risk of your own neck.
   Benefit: You can expend one luck point to redirect an attack made against an adjacent ally so that it is made against you instead. You must be within reach of the attacker (if a melee attack) or within range of the attack (if a ranged attack) in order to use this ability. The attack roll result remains the same, but it is against your Armor Class, rather than that of your ally. If the redirected attack hits you, you take a one and one-half times the normal damage from it.

Healer's Luck [Luck, Changeling](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
Your spells can heal more damage.
   Benefit: You can expend one luck point to reroll the number of points of damage healed by a conjuration (healing) spell you have just cast on your current turn.

Lucky Break [Luck, Changeling](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
You can hit an object in just the right place.
   Benefit: You can expend one luck point to reroll a Strength check made to break an item or burst open a door.

Lucky Critical [Changeling, Luck](adapted from the D&D Wiki, created by Eiji-kun)
You frequently get lucky and strike foes with deadly blows.
   Prerequisite: Two other Luck feats or the Fortune Domain and one other Luck feat.
   Benefit: By expending a luck point, you gain a luck bonus that expands your weapon's critical threat range, in a manner identical to the spell Keen Edge or Weapon of Impact. This stacks with Improved Critical and the Keen or Impact abilities, but you must still confirm the critical.
   Special: Unlike most other uses of luck points, this feat uses luck points prior to the initial roll.

Lucky Failure [Changeling, Luck](adapted from the D&D Wiki, created by Eiji-kun)
Your luck protects you from dangerous mishaps.
   Benefit: By expending a luck point, you can avoid negative results from ability and skill checks. If an ability check or skill check would result in consequences other than "no progress", you expend the luck point and avoid the consequences. The consequences never go into play in the first place, and could be triggered again later. Example: You botch a trap and would set it off, but you use a luck point. The trap was never set off, merely that it wasn't disabled. Likewise, botching a Use Magic Device on a scroll doesn't give a failed result and doesn't consume the scroll. You could not use this on a grapple check, where the only degrees of failure is succeeding or failing.

Lucky Start [Luck, Changeling](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
Sometimes your luck overcomes a slow natural reaction.
   Benefit: You can expend one luck point to reroll an initiative check.

Lucky Strike [Changeling, Luck](adapted from the D&D Wiki, created by Eiji-kun)
Your luck allows you to penetrate your enemies' defenses.
   Prerequisites: One other Luck feat or the Fortune Domain power.
   Benefit: By expending one or more luck points, you can maximize the damage dice of your weapon. You can maximize up to three dice in damage for each luck point you choose to expend.
   Special: Unlike most other uses of luck points, this feat uses luck points prior to the initial roll.

Lucky Touch [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
Your luck helps those around you.
   Prerequisite: 10 luck points in your luck pool.
   Benefit: Another character can reroll one skill check, attack roll, or saving throw when you spend the required number of luck points on the character's behalf. You may do so as a free action whenever you have luck points remaining. The target must be in line of sight and cannot already have spent luck points on the same roll.
   Normal: Characters can only spend luck points to reroll dice for their own actions.
   Special: The luck prerequisite only applies when you choose the feat. Lucky Touch is still available if your luck point drop below that level later.

Magical Fortune [Luck, Changeling](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
Even you are sometimes surprised by how well your spells work.
   Benefit: You can expend one luck point to reroll the damage dealt by a spell you have just cast. You can expend two luck points to reroll a caster level check.

Miser's Fortune [Luck, Changeling](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
Items belonging to you and your allies are abnormally resistant to damage.
   Benefit: Whenever an opponent makes a sunder attack or Strength check to damage an object within 30 feet of you, you can expend one luck point as an immediate action to force that opponent to reroll. In addition, as long as you still have one luck in your luck pool, items in your possession receive a +5 luck bonus on saving throws.

A Step Ahead [Changeling, Luck](from the Book of Roguish Luck)
You are luckier than others like you.
   Prerequisite: 10 luck points in your luck pool.
   Benefit: You can spend luck points to reroll an attack roll, skill check, or saving throw more than once, as long as you have additional luck points left to spend. Thus, a character who took A Step Ahead would be able to reroll as often as he liked, spending 1 or 2 luck points each time he does so.
   Normal: Characters can only use luck points to make a single reroll of an attack roll, skill check, or saving throw.
   Special: The luck prerequisite only applies when you choose the feat. A Step Ahead is still available if your luck point drop below that level later.

Tempting Fate [Luck, Changeling](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
You are very hard to kill.
   Prerequisite: Character Level 6th+, one other Luck feat.
   Benefit: You can expend a luck point to reroll a stabilization check. In addition, once per day, whenever you have at least 1 hit point remaining and would be dealt enough damage to kill you, you can expend one luck point take only enough damage to reduce you to -9 hit points. You automatically stabilize.

Unbelievable Luck [Luck, Changeling](adapted from Complete Scoundrel)
The powers of fortune truly smile on you more than most mortals.
   Prerequisite: One other Luck feat.
   Benefit: As long as you have at least one luck point remaining in your luck pool, you gain a +2 luck bonus on whichever of your saves has the lowest base bonus. If two or more of your saves tie for the lowest base bonus, choose when you select this feat which save it applies to. If your base save bonuses later change so that the chosen save no longer has the lowest base bonus, the luck bonus from this feat immediately applies to the save that now has the lowest base bonus.

Home     General Rules

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Campaign Design - The Luck System

The Luck System
(from the Book of Roguish Luck)

All characters are lucky or unlucky to some degree, but rogues, chameleons, scouts, and similar characters tend to be luckier than most. The luck system grants all characters luck points, represented by a renewable pool of points that one can apply to saving throws, attack rolls, and skill checks.

On a going forward basis, I am eliminating the use of the Swashbuckling Cards and the Hero Points. The Swashbuckling Cards have mostly been more amusing in theory than useful in practice, with the cards rarely seeming to be in the hands of players when they would be helpful. It also seems that people routinely forget they even have them. As far has Hero Points go, no one ever seems to have bothered to use them, and I suspect that most of the players in the campaign don't even remember that they exist. Instead, I'm going to introduce the Luck System from the Book of Roguish Luck into the campaign.

I will point out that this system may at times be something of a mixed blessing. While these rules will help player characters succeed more often on a given roll, NPCs and monsters can use them too. For most monsters, this factor won't make a big difference, but fortune's favor means that powerful villains may succeed more often.

Luck Points
ClassLuck Die
Rogue
1d10
Scout
1d6
Barbarian
1d4+1
Fighter
1d4
Cleric
1d3
Druid
1d3
Favored Soul
1d3
Monk
1d2
Sorcerer
1d2
Wizard
1d2
Each character begins play with a number of luck points, determined by her character class and the roll of the initial Luck Die, plus her Charisma modifier. A character might have 0 or negative luck points at 1st level. The luck die for each class playable in the campaign will be listed in the class description. For convenience, the luck die for the base classes available in the campaign are listed on the table to the right.

Note: I am uncertain about using different luck die for different classes. This is the base version of the rule as presented in the Book of Roguish Luck, but I am not certain what the basis for having differing die for each class is, or whether this is a balanced system. As we see how this works in play, I'll reevaluate as necessary.

When a character increases in level, she gains additional luck points to spend and raises the maximum number of luck points she may have at a given time. The number of luck points a character gains depends on the class she has just advanced in.

Prestige classes gain points depending on whether they are primarily rogish classes (1d6), fighting classes (1d4), divine casters (1d3) or arcane casters (1d2). This is a DM determination for each prestige class. As prestige classes get added to the campaign documentation, I will make evaluations concerning what kind of luck die they use.

A character's maximum luck always equals her starting luck roll plus her rolls from gaining additional levels, just like maximum hit points. A character cannot exceed this number of luck points, even through the use of spells, feats, or magic items that grant additional luck points.

Using Luck Points
A character can spend luck points to improve an attack roll, a skill check, or a saving throw. Luck points cannot be used to reroll damage rolls, hit point rolls, ability checks, caster level checks, or percentile rolls.

One can use luck points to improve initiative checks or negate critical hits in conjunction with appropriate Luck Feats or class abilities. I will be posting feat and spell descriptions that affect luck in the near future.

Lucky Attack and Lucky Skill Checks
A character can use luck points to reroll attack rolls and skill checks. When an attack roll or skill check has failed, a player may declare that roll unlucky after the fact and announce that she is making a lucky roll. The character spends 1 luck point from her pool to reroll the original d20 roll. A luck reroll can only be made once for each attack roll or skill check, unless the character has the A Step Ahead feat.

When a character spends a luck point, she rerolls the attack roll or skill check immediately. The spent luck point is deducted from the character's pool, which she can replenish by gaining additional levels or through certain feats, spells, and magic items. The result of the second roll is used, whether it succeeded or not.

A luck point may be used to reroll an attempt to confirm a critical hit.

If a character's luck pool falls to 0 points or less (due to a spell effect or use of the Burn Luck feat), she cannot make any luck rerolls until her pool has at least 1 point in it.

Lucky Saving Throws
Lucky saving throws are similar to lucky attacks and lucky skill checks, but it costs 2 points to reroll a failed save. The character is stuck with the result of the second roll, whether it succeeds or not.

Magic and Luck
Sorcerers, wizards, arcane engineers, and other arcane casters can use luck to reduce or avoid the chance of arcane spell failure when casting a spell. To do so, such a character spends 1 luck point for every 5 percent chance of spell failure she wishes to offset. If this expenditure of luck brings the arcane spell failure chance to 0 percent, she need make no arcane spell failure roll.

Regaining Luck Points
A character accrues luck points by gaining a level, from the effects of certain spells or Luck Feats, and sometimes when granted as part of an adventurer's award. Luck is a fairly rare quantity in the universe. Be careful how you spend it.

Lucky Style
Players may earn luck points for good play. A player who makes the group laugh (or gasp), a player who delivers a line with gusto, or a player who steps up to a big confrontation may earn a luck point for doing so. Lucky style points are awarded immediately and can be used immediately.

All of these awards are more or less arbitrary and entirely at the DM's discretion, but the general idea is to reward good and amusing play. None of these awards will normally be given more than once per game session.

Impressing the Group: If everyone at the table goes "Oooooh" at what a character just did or said, it is probably worth a point.

Invoking Lady Luck: A truly amusing bit of pleading might be worth 1 luck point. Point-mongering and chiseling for points will be ignored. I may make this award based on a die roll or coin flip.

Extra Style or Panache: When someone performs with daring, pluck, spirit, or bravado, such as facing down a powerful demon while the rest of the party flees, to taking on the elder dragon's mother-in-law, that character deserves a luck point, She'll probably need it.

Making the Group Laugh: It's about having fun. Jokers will get luck points.

Taking a Huge Chance: Sometimes a character does something monumentally stupid that may save the entire party. If the party survives, I'll grant that character 2 luck points. This award will never be given to someone being stupid to save themselves, only for helping other characters.

Luckiest Player: If someone just made an almost impossible roll with or without spending a luck point, she deserves a luck point. This award isn't just for rolling a 20 to get a critical threat, but also for a low-Wisdom barbarian who sees through the clever bluff of the wily villain against all odds, or the foolhardy gnome who decides to disarm the fiendishly clever trap with a toothpick and some cross-class ranks in Disable Device.

Writing Up a Game Session: Any player who does a good write-up about a game session to share with the group gets a luck point. Maybe two.

Maximum Luck
No character may exceed her maximum luck. Maximum luck is always equal to the total result of all Luck Dice the character has rolled, just as maximum hit points are always equal to the total result of all Hit Dice the character has rolled.

Home     Three Worlds

Campaign Design - Base Classes: Bandit

Bandit
(from the Book of Roguish Luck)

Whether operating as scouts, burglars, or brigands, bandits are simply thieves who eschew the city for the easier pickings of the wide-open countryside. These woodland and rural rogues don't earn an honest living; instead, they smuggle, poach, rustle, and rob from the rich - because that's where the money is. What they lack in urban skills they more than make up for in scouting, ambush, and tracking expertise.

Abilities: Dexterity is crucial for a bandit to move quickly and stealthily when preparing ambushes, stalking deer, or evading pursuit. Wisdom is important when tracking, spotting, or hearing an ambush, judging others' intentions, and working with animals, such as when silencing dogs. Strength helps a bandit fight, climb, and swim away from trouble.
Race: Kell.
Alignment: Any nonlawful. A bandit who becomes lawful cannot gain new levels as a bandit, but retains all bandit abilities.
Hit Die: d6.
Luck Die: d6.

Class Skills
  • Skill List: The bandit's class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int), Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Diplomacy (Cha), Disable Device (Int), Disguise (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Forgery (Int), Gather Information (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Hide (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Knowledge: Local (Int), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Profession: Any (Wis), Ride (Dex), Search (Int), Sense Motive (Wis), Spot (Wis), Survival (Wis), Swim (Str), Tumble (Dex),, and Use Rope (Dex).
  • Note: Because the Three Worlds campaign uses the Skills by Character house rule, the list of class skills given here is only included for the sake of completeness, and is not used by characters in the campaign setting.
  • Skill Points at 1st Level: (6 + Intelligence modifier) x 4.
  • Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 6 + Intelligence modifier.
Class Features
  • Base Attack Bonus: Average. A bandit gains +¾ base attack bonus per class level.

  • Base Fortitude Save Bonus: Poor. A bandit gains a +13 base Fortitude save bonus per class level.

  • Base Reflex Save Bonus: Good. A bandit gains a +2½ base Reflex save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Reflex save bonus per class level.

  • Base Will Save Bonus: Poor. A bandit gains a +13 base Will save bonus per class level.

  • Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Bandits are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, and with all light and medium armor, but not with shields.

  • Furtive Trail (Ex): A bandit is highly skilled at covering his tracks. The Difficulty Class of any Survival check made in an attempt to track a bandit increases by 10 rather than the usual 5. A bandit can use this ability to cover tracks while she is mounted and can cover the tracks of a number of mounts or companions equal to half her level.
    At 8th level, a bandit can more at full walking or riding speed while covering her own tracks, and at half speed while covering the tracks of others.

  • Quick Draw: At 2nd level, a bandit gains the feat Quick Draw as a bonus feat, even if she does not meet the prerequisites.

  • Special Ability: Starting at 2nd level and every fifth level thereafter (7th, 12th, and 17th), a bandit gains a special ability of his choice from among the following options:

    • Evasion (Ex): A bandit can avoid even magical and unusual attacks with great agility. If she makes a successful Reflex saving throw against an attack that normally deals half-damage on a successful save (such as a lightning bolt), she instead takes no damage. Evasion applies only if the bandit is wearing light armor or no armor. A helpless bandit (such as one who is tied up, unconscious, or held) does not gain the benefit of evasion.

    • Eye Strike (Ex): A bandit who rolls a critical threat may try to blind an opponent instead of increasing his damage. To do so, the bandit replaces the roll to confirm the critical hit with an eye-strike attack roll against his foe, using the foe's normal Armor Class. If this attack fails, the bandit deals no damage on the attack.
      Should the eye strike attack succeed, the target is entitled to a Reflex save (DC 10 + half the bandit's class level). If the save succeeds, the target suffers the minimum damage for the attack, as if the bandit had rolled a 1 on all damage dice (including sneak attack damage).
      If the save fails, the bandit deals normal damage (no doubling or tripling from critical damage, and no sneak attack bonuses) and injures the eyes or eyelids of the her target enough to prevent normal vision temporarily. The opponent is blinded for 2d4 rounds, loses his Dexterity bonus to Armor Class, suffers a 50 percent miss chance on attack rolls, and cannot make attacks of opportunity. The loss of sight can be restored before its normal duration ends by regeneration, a cure spell, or natural healing sufficient to offset the damage from the attack.
      A bandit can make eye strike attacks only against living creatures with discernible eyes - undead, constructs, oozes, plants, and incorporeal creatures lack vital areas to attack. Any creature that is immune to critical hits is not vulnerable to eye strike attacks. The bandit must be able to see the target well enough to pick out its eyes, and must be able to reach them. Large creatures that are tall may be able to avoid an eye strike by a melee weapon due to their relative height. A bandit cannot make an eye strike against a creature with concealment or whose eyes are beyond reach.
      Creatures with multiple heads or more than two eyes, such as ettins and eye tyrants, can be blinded more than once, but each success only affects one head or eyestalk.

    • Feat: A bandit may gain a bonus feat in place of a special ability. She must meet all the prerequisites for the bonus feat.

    • Flying Charge (Ex): When a bandit makes a charge while mounted, from a jump, or from a swinging rope, she gains a +4 bonus on the attack roll rather than the usual +2 bonus. A bandit suffers only a -4 penalty to Armor Class from a flying charge. The charge, jump, or rope-swing may require a Ride, Jump, or Tumble check, depending on circumstances.

    • Knockout (Ex): This ability can be chosen only at 7th level or higher. A bandit can knock out an opponent faster and more reliably than anyone. Whenever a bandit chooses to make a melee attack for nonlethal damage, she gains her sneak attack damage as bonus damage on the attack if the opponent fails a Fortitude save (DC 10 + the bandit's class level). If the knockout attempt is already a sneak attack, the sneak attack damage increases by an additional 2d6 points. The knockout ability cannot be used with ranged weapons, and this ability does not stack with the use of a merciful weapon.
      These nonlethal strikes are more difficult to execute than normal strikes, since they involve striking at the head or spine of an opponent. If the strike fails, the bandit has gotten too close and opened herself up, and she immediately provokes an attack of opportunity from the target.

    • Low Blow (Ex): A bandit can use dirt, sticks, a kick, or other unexpected tactics to gain a sudden advantage during melee combat. a low blow attack can be made as a standard action whenever the bandit attacks a flat-footed foe (though not a flanked foe). The low blow attack is rolled as an unarmed attack; the bandit must declare the attack as a stunning attempt or a trip attempt before the die is rolled. If successful, the opponent suffers the minimum damage for the bandit's attack and is left either stunned for 1 round or prone. If the low blow attack fails, the bandit inflicts no damage.
      Attempting a low blow does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

    • Opportunist (Ex): Once per round, a bandit can make a melee attack of opportunity against an opponent who has just been struck for damage in melee by another character. This attack counts as the bandit's attack of opportunity for that round. Even a bandit with the Combat Reflexes feat can't use the opportunity more than once per round. The bandit must be threatening the opponent to use this ability.

  • Diehard: At 3rd level, a bandit's strength of will grants her the feat Diehard as a bonus feat, even if she does not meet the prerequisites.

  • Sneak Attack: If a bandit of 3nd level or higher can catch an opponent when he is unable to defend himself effectively from her attack, she can strike a vital spot for extra damage.
    The bandit’s attack deals extra damage any time her target would be denied a Dexterity bonus to Armor Class (whether the target actually has a Dexterity bonus or not), or when the bandit flanks her target. This extra damage is 1d6 at 3rd level, and it increases by 1d6 every two bandit levels thereafter. Should the bandit score a critical hit with a sneak attack, this extra damage is not multiplied.
    Ranged attacks can count as sneak attacks only if the target is within one range increment or 30 feet, whichever is shorter.
    With a sap (blackjack) or an unarmed strike, a bandit can make a sneak attack that deals nonlethal damage instead of lethal damage. She cannot use a weapon that deals lethal damage to deal nonlethal damage in a sneak attack, not even with the usual -4 penalty.
    A bandit can sneak attack only living creatures with discernible anatomies - undead, constructs, oozes, plants, and incorporeal creatures lack vital areas to attack. Any creature that is immune to critical hits is not vulnerable to sneak attacks. The bandit must be able to see the target well enough to pick out a vital spot and must be able to reach such a spot. A bandit cannot sneak attack while striking a creature with concealment or striking the limbs of a creature whose vitals are beyond reach.
    The sneak attack damage of a bandit stacks with sneak attack damage gained from other sources.

  • Pounce: (Ex) At 4th level and higher, a bandit can maximize her advantage when she catches others off guard. A bandit can take a full attack action when she charges an opponent who is surprised, flat-footed, or who would be denied his Dexterity bonus to Armor Class.

  • Bravado (Ex): At 6th level, a bandit can use a flurry of attacks to overwhelm an opponent who is caught off guard. The bandit gains a +2 bonus to all damage rolls made during a surprise round.
  • Improved Disarm: At 6th level, a bandit gains the feat Improved Disarm as a bonus feat, even if she does not meet the prerequisites.

  • Ride Like the Wind (Ex): At 8th level or higher, a bandit can outride most pursuit without difficulty. A bandit's mount gains a 10-foot bonus to its speed whenever the bandit rides it, even in unusual movement modes (such as flight). The bandit herself gains a +4 competence bonus on all Ride checks in combat. This ability can be used whether or not the bandit is being pursued.

  • Strike First: When she reaches 12th level, the bandit gains a +2 bonus to Initiative checks.

  • Woodland Stealth: (Ex) When a bandit reaches 14th level, she gains the ability to blend into natural terrain. This ability means that a bandit can normally or take two move actions while hiding and moving silently in natural terrain without suffering the usual -5 penalties for moving at full speed and hiding. A bandit cannot run while using this ability and cannot hide while being directly observed.
    If she is traveling on a mount through natural terrain that provides concealment, a bandit can apply her ranks in Hide or Move Silently to her mount's checks with these skills. She can move at normal speed when doing so, but cannot take a double move, run, or withdraw while using woodland stealth when mounted.
    Normally, a rider cannot attempt to hide while mounted.

  • Great Disarm:. At 16th level or higher, a bandit can disarm a flat-footed opponent as a free action. If successful, she removes a single held or sheathed weapon from the target creature and can make an immediate followup attack.
    The bandit can gain possession of the item if she chooses, or she may toss the item up to 10 feet away as part of the great disarm attempt.

  • Great Escape: (Ex) At 20th level, a bandit gains the ability to retreat from any fight unharmed. She gains a +4 bonus on Tumble checks when withdrawing from melee combat, and she can do so at full speed rather than half speed without penalty. With a successful Tumble check, she can leave combat at full running speed without provoking an attack of opportunity.
    If she must tumble through occupied squares or over the heads of foes, the Tumble check Difficulty Class increases by 5.
    This ability also helps bandits escape from magical constraints such as a hold person spell or supernatural paralysis; doing so requires a full-round action and an Escape Artist check. The Difficulty Class to escape from magical bonds is equal to the save DC of the spell +5.
    The bandit is always entitled to an Escape Artist check, even in situations that normally do not allow one.
Bandit
LevelSpecial
1thFurtive trail
2ndQuick Draw, special ability
3rdDiehard, sneak attack +1d6
4thPounce
5thSneak attack +2d6
6thBravado, Improved Disarm
7thSneak attack +3d6, special ability
8thRide like the wind, furtive trail (full speed)
9thSneak attack +4d6
10th-
11thSneak attack +5d6
12thStrike first, special ability
13thSneak attack +6d6
14thWoodland stealth
15thSneak attack +7d6
16thGreat disarm
17thSneak attack +8d6, special ability
18th-
19thSneak attack +9d6
20thGreat escape

Home
    Base Classes

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Campaign Design - Bloodlines: Elemental-Blooded

Elemental-Blooded
(adapted from Unearthed Arcana)

Individuals with elemental blood in their veins are not uncommon in the Three Worlds. Creatures of elemental air, earth, fire, and water often crossbreed with the inhabitants of the world, resulting in progeny with abilities and affinities that reflect their elemental ancestry. Sometimes those with elemental blood show up immediately, and in some places they are common enough to form their own communities and breed true among themselves. In others the effect of such crossbreeding can lie fallow for generations, only to come to the fore after many generations of dormancy.

In most cases, the elemental ancestor can be ascertained, or at least guessed at based upon family histories and legends, but in others it is a mystery. Some scholars have speculated that no interbreeding with an elemental creature is necessary to result in elemental-blooded children - only that the parent be exposed to a powerful enough source of elemental power during conception, pregnancy, or delivery of the child. Such scholars often also believe that the dwarven race owes its terran affinity to the fact that they live underground for so much of their lives, so they and their theories are generally not taken seriously by others.

Auran-Blooded
The auran bloodline derives its power from a connection to the elemental Plane of Air. Characters with auran bloodlines tend to shift between emotions with surprising quickness, and may have hair or skin tinged with light blue.

Auran Bloodline Traits

Character Level
MinorIntermediate
2nd
+2 on Balance checks
4th
+2 on Balance checksImproved Initiative
6th
Dexterity +1
8th
Improved InitiativeGust of wind, once per day (Sp)
10th
Auran affinity +21
12th
Dexterity +1Weapon Finesse
14th
+2 on Spot checks
16th
Gust of wind, once per day (Sp)Air master (Ex)2
18th
Constitution +1
20th
Auran affinity +21Flyby Attack
1 You gain the indicated bonus on all Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, and Perform checks made to interact with air elementals and other creatures from the Elemental Plane of Air.
2 Airborne creatures take a -1 penalty on attack and damage rolls against you.

Racial Restriction: Dwarves cannot be auran-blooded.

Exclusive Class: All elemental-blooded individuals replace their racial exclusive class with the Shugenja class. An auran-blooded shugenja must choose the air element focus.

Aquan-Blooded
The aquan bloodline is most common among sailors and fishermen, and even the occasional character with no link whatsoever to oceans, seas, or large lakes. Such characters are often independent-minded, and generally don't live in any one place for long.

Aquan Bloodline Traits

Character Level
MinorIntermediate
2nd
+2 on Swim checks
4th
+2 on Swim checksPower Attack
6th
Strength +1
8th
Power AttackFog cloud, once per day (Sp)
10th
Aquan affinity +21
12th
Strength +1+1 to natural armor
14th
+2 on Spot checks
16th
Fog cloud, once per day (Sp)Swim 30 feet2
18th
Constitution +1
20th
Aquan affinity +21Improved Bull Rush
1 You gain the indicated bonus on all Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, and Perform checks made to interact with water elementals and other creatures from the Elemental Plane of Water.
2 If you already have a Swim speed, you gain +30 feet to your Swim speed.

Racial Restriction: Dwarves cannot be aquan-blooded.

Exclusive Class: All elemental-blooded individuals replace their racial exclusive class with the Shugenja class. An aquan-blooded shugenja must choose the water element focus.

Ignan-Blooded
Those who bear elemental fire within their veins are often high-strung and quick-tempered. Their eyes often seem to glow like embers, and their skin may take on a reddish hue.

Ignan Bloodline Traits

Character Level
MinorIntermediate
2nd
+2 on Tumble checks
4th
+2 on Tumble checksDodge
6th
Dexterity +1
8th
DodgePyrotechnics, once per day (Sp)
10th
Ignan affinity +21
12th
Dexterity +1Mobility
14th
+2 on Listen checks
16th
Pyrotechnics, once per day (Sp)Fire Resistance 10 (Ex)
18th
Constitution +1
20th
Ignan affinity +21Spring Attack
1 You gain the indicated bonus on all Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, and Perform checks made to interact with fire elementals and other creatures from the Elemental Plane of Fire.

Exclusive Class: All elemental-blooded individuals replace their racial exclusive class with the Shugenja class. An ignan-blooded shugenja must choose the fire element focus.

Terran-Blooded
Creatures that bear a bloodline of elemental earth feel a sense of gravity and stability that ties them to the stones of the world. They have a palpable sense of inertia about them, which sometimes manifests as a slowness to take action.

Terran Bloodline Traits

Character Level
MinorIntermediate
2nd
+2 on Climb checks
4th
+2 on Climb checksPower Attack
6th
Strength +1
8th
Power AttackMeld into stone, once per day (Sp)
10th
Terran affinity +21
12th
Strength +1+1 to natural armor
14th
+2 on Listen checks
16th
Meld into stone, once per day (Sp)Earth mastery (Ex)2
18th
Constitution +1
20th
Terran affinity +21Improved Sunder
1 You gain the indicated bonus on all Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, and Perform checks made to interact with earth elementals and other creatures from the Elemental Plane of Earth.
2 You gain a +1 bonus on attack and damage rolls if both you and your foe touch the ground. If an opponent is airborne or waterborne, you suffer a -4 penalty on attack and damage rolls.

Exclusive Class: All elemental-blooded individuals replace their racial exclusive class with the Shugenja class. A terran-blooded shugenja must choose the earth element focus.

Home     Three Worlds     Bloodlines

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Campaign Design - Bloodlines: Hag-Blooded

Hag-Blooded
(adapted from Unearthed Arcana)

Like Abonde, most hags are driven to have children. Many hags have the ability to change their appearance, making it possible for them to interact with creatures of other races. Though horrible to contemplate, some use this ability to lure in mates, in the hopes that the offspring can help them further their evil plots. Although most hags prefer that giants and ogres father their children, they have been known to interbreed with almost every known species.

Hag rarely raise their own children. Instead, they usually sneak into some unsuspecting person's house, steal their baby, and replace it with their hag-born infant. In this way, hag blood enters outlying communities, with the children growing up, living their lives, and having their own children. The hag traits might reveal themselves in such children, or they might lie dormant for generations and appear in the progeny of individuals who had no clue about their hagish heritage. Most people with hagish heritage live on the outskirts of civilization, in settlements near the wilderness where most hags make their homes, but due to the vagaries of human travel and the fact that latent hag-blood can remain undetected for generations, even those in the most sophisticated of cities can find themselves raising a child who displays hag traits.

Having hag blood in a community is usually considered something of a mixed blessing. On the one hand, people are understandably horrified at the thought that their own children might be spirited away and replaced by hag offspring. On the other hand, many of the denizens of rural areas already have hag blood flowing through their veins, and thus owe their very existence to their hagish ancestor. Further, only the hag-blooded are blessed with the talents needed to become witches, who are considered to be valuable members of the community by almost every rural village. The descendants of a hag are thought of as being hardier shrewder than the norm and often share their ancestor's love of schemes, making them valuable members of their villages.

Hag Bloodline Traits

Character Level
MinorIntermediate
2nd
+2 on Hide checks
4th
+2 on Hide checksSkill Augmentation (Listen and Spot)
6th
Strength +1
8th
Skill Augmentation (Listen and Spot)+1 to natural armor
10th
Hag affinity +21
12th
Strength +1Double heal rate (Ex)2
14th
+2 on Listen checks
16th
+1 to natural armorPower Attack or Item Creation Feat3
18th
Constitution +1
20th
Hag affinity +21Scent (Ex)
1 You gain the indicated bonus on all Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, and Perform checks made to interact with hags.
2You heal naturally at double normal rates.
3You may choose to gain any item creation feat for which you meet the prerequisites.

Exclusive Class: All hag-blooded individuals replace their racial exclusive class with the Witch class.

Gender: Individuals of any gender may have a minor hag bloodline. Only female characters may have an intermediate hag bloodline. A child born with the equivalent of a major hag bloodline is simply a hag.

Home     Three Worlds     Bloodlines

Monday, September 18, 2017

Campaign Design - Base Classes: Witch

Witch
(from The Witch's Handbook)

For wizards, magic is an art, both scholarly and complex, to be studied and mastered. For sorcerers, it is a talent, born in their blood, to be practiced and strengthened. For divine spell casters such as clerics, favored souls, druids, and spirit shamans, magic is a gift, whether from the gods, the natural world, or the spirit world.

And for some, magic is a craft, one of the oldest crafts, time-honored and handed down from generation to generation. It is the craft of weaving and making, the craft of charms and spells, the craft of witchcraft.

The witch is a spell caster who sees magic as a humble craft to be practiced and learned like any other. Witches are often rural folk, but that doesn't mean they're not every bit as sophisticated as other spell casters.

Abilities: Wisdom determines how powerful a spell a witch can cast, how many spells a witch can cast per day, and how difficult those spells are to resist. To cast a spell, a witch must have a Wisdom score of 10 + the spell's level. A witch gets bonus spells based upon her Wisdom. The Difficulty Class of a saving throw against a witch's spell is 10 + the spell's level + the witch's Wisdom modifier. Witches benefit from a high Dexterity since they wear little or no armor, and a good Constitution grants a few extra hit points and helps a witch to better survive.
Race: Hag-Blooded.
Alignment: Any.
Hit Die: d4.
Luck Die: d3.

Class Skills
  • Skill List: The witch's class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con), Craft: Any (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Knowledge: Arcana (Int), Knowledge: Nature (Int), Profession: Any (Wis), and Sense Motive (Wis), Spellcraft (Int), Survival (Wis), and Swim (Str).
  • Note: Because the Three Worlds campaign uses the Skills by Character house rule, the list of class skills given here is only included for the sake of completeness, and is not used by characters in the campaign setting.
  • Skill Points at 1st Level: (4 + Intelligence modifier) x4.
  • Skill Points at Each Additional Class Level: 4 + Intelligence modifier.

Class Features
All of the following are class features of the witch:
  • Base Attack Bonus: Poor. A witch gains +½ base attack bonus per class level.

  • Fortitude Base Save Bonus: Poor. A witch gains +13 base Fortitude save bonus per class level.

  • Reflex Base Save Bonus: Poor. A witch gains +13 base Reflex save bonus per class level.

  • Will Base Save Bonus: Good. A witch gains a +2½ base Will save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Will save bonus per class level.

  • Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Witches are proficient with all simple weapons. They are not proficient with any type of armor, or with shields.

  • Spells: A witch casts arcane spells from the witch spell list. Witches begin play knowing a limited number of spells. At each level, the witch learns one or more new spells, as indicated on the table below. These spells must come from the witch spell list. Witches cannot normally learn or cast other arcane spells, although I may add more thematically appropriate spells to the list as I go through various supplemental sourcebooks. Witchcraft focuses on spells of divination, healing, illusion, and transformation, and not the flashier magic associated with sorcerers and wizards.

    A witch is limited to casting a certain number of spells per day, but she does not need to prepare her spells in advance. She can cast any spell she knows, provided she has an available spell slot of that level. Higher-level spell slots can be used to cast lower-level spells, if desired. The number and level of spells a witch can cast per day improves with her level.

    Upon reaching 4th level, and at every even numbered witch level after that, a witch can choose to learn a new spell in place of one she already knows. In effect, the witch “loses” the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell's level must be at least two levels lower than the highest level witch spell the witch can cast. A witch may swap only a single spell at any given level and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that he gains new spells known for the level.

    To learn and cast a spell, a witch must have a Wisdom score of at least 10 + the spell's level. The Difficulty Class for saving throws against a witch's spells is 10 + the spell's level + the witch's Wisdom modifier. Witches gain bonus spells per day based upon their Wisdom score.

  • Bonus Languages: A witch may add Sûlic of Jattalaic to the list of bonus languages available to her normally because of her race. Arcane spells are often written in Sûlic, so witches learn it as part of their studies, and witches have an ancient association with giants, so their language is used among them.

  • Familiar (Sp): A witch can summon a familiar in exactly the same manner as a sorcerer. Witch familiars are often either black or pure white albinos with red eyes. Common familiars for witches include cats, owls, ravens, and toads.

  • Bonus Feats: Every five levels, a witch gains a bonus feat. This feat must be an item creation feat. These feats are in addition to the normal feats granted by the character's character level. The witch must meet the prerequisites for any bonus feats.

  • A Thousand Faces (Sp): At 13th level, a witch gains the supernatural ability to change her appearance at will, as if using the spell alter self.

  • Timeless Body (Su): At 17th level, a witch no longer suffers ability penalties for aging and cannot be magically aged. Any penalties she may have already suffered, however, remain in place. Bonuses still accrue, and the witch still dies of old age when her time is up.
Witch                              Spells per Day
Level
Special
0th
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
1st
Familiar
5
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2nd
-
6
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3rd
-
6
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4th
-
6
6
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5th
Bonus Feat
6
6
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6th
-
6
6
5
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
7th
-
6
6
6
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
8th
-
6
6
6
5
3
-
-
-
-
-
9th
-
6
6
6
6
4
-
-
-
-
-
10th
Bonus Feat
6
6
6
6
5
3
-
-
-
-
11th
-
6
6
6
6
6
4
-
-
-
-
12th
-
6
6
6
6
6
5
3
-
-
-
13th
A Thousand Faces
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
-
-
-
14th
-
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
3
-
-
15th
Bonus Feat
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
-
-
16th
-
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
3
-
17th
Timeless Body
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
-
18th
-
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
3
19th
-
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
20th
Bonus Feat
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6

Spells Known
Level0th1st2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8th9th
1st
4
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2nd
5
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3rd
5
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4th
6
3
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5th
6
4
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6th
7
4
2
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
7th
7
5
3
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
8th
8
5
3
2
1
-
-
-
-
-
9th
8
5
4
3
2
-
-
-
-
-
10th
9
5
4
3
2
1
-
-
-
-
11th
9
5
5
4
3
2
-
-
-
-
12th
9
5
5
4
3
2
1
-
-
-
13th
9
5
5
4
4
3
2
-
-
-
14th
9
5
5
4
4
3
2
1
-
-
15th
9
5
5
4
4
4
3
2
-
-
16th
9
5
5
4
4
4
3
2
1
-
17th
9
5
5
4
4
4
3
3
2
-
18th
9
5
5
4
4
4
3
3
2
1
19th
9
5
5
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
20th
9
5
5
4
4
4
3
3
3
3

Home     Base Classes