Friday, December 9, 2016

House Rules - Magic Poisons

Magic Poisons (from The Book of Eldritch Might)

Assassins are a deviously creative lot. In a world where their victim can come back from the dead even faster than it took to put them there in the first place, a few magical tricks can help a non-spellcaster (or a minor spellcaster) use spell-like attacks - in this case, through the edge of a blade or laced into a glass of wine.

Every magical poison described here carries two effects: Its normal, non magical poisoning effect, and an accompanying magical effect. The magical effects are instantaneous, thus not subject to dispelling. Victims with Spell resistance may use their resistance to avoid the magical effect (though not the non-magical one).

Creatures immune to poisons are immune to the spell-like effects of magic poisons as well. Neutralize poison can render both aspects of a magic poison harmless; treat as though dispel magic were cast against the caster level of the magic poison's creator. Thus, to cancel out effects, a caster of neutralize poison makes a level check with a DC of 11 + the caster level listed with the poison.

Creating Magic Poisons

Magic poisons may be made by those with the feat Manufacture Magic Poison. Magic poisons are brewed and simmered for a long time, or produced by feeding special ingredients to plants that in turn produce the required effect. Thus, it often takes weeks to produce a magic poison. Unlike most magic item creation processes, during the process you only need to spend one hour per day working on the poison.

To figure the market price for a magic poison, determine the approximate level of the poison's effect and multiply 60 shillings times the spell level times the caster level. The prices pertaining to spells that often affect a number of targets should be adjusted downward when placed into a poison (which only affects one creature); reduce these prices by up to 20%. Otherwise, manufacturing magic poisons is much like creating a potion, as described in the Dungeon Master's Guide.

Magic Poison Powers

Using Magic Poisons
Each of the magic poisons listed in this section is meant to be added to a mundane poison, like those found in the Dungeon Master's Guide. They do not have to be. If you desire only the magical effect, add the magical powers to an inert paste instead of to a poison. Characters can coat a blade with this substance or ally it directly to food or drink to be ingested

Note that some magic poisons, such as coldheart, take effect only when the save against the actual poison fails. These would have no effect if added to an innocuous substance.
Coldheart: The victim suffers 3d6 points of cold damage upon the failure of each save against the poison. There is no additional save for the cold damage.
  Caster Level: 5th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, mark of frost; Market Price: 900 shillings.

Crippling Doom: Victims who fail a Will save (DC 11) are filled with dread and pain, suffering a -2 morale penalty to attack rolls, checks, and saving throws for two minutes.
  Caster Level: 2nd; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, doom; Market Price: 120 shillings.

Darkmind: Victims who fail a Fortitude save (DC 19) fall into a coma, alive but unable to take actions of any kind, physical or mental. The coma lasts 1d10 days.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, coma; Market Price: 4,700 shillings.

Delusion: The victim of this poison is deluded into ignoring the damage it inflicts. The character simply does not recognize that the poison has had an effect. No save.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, confusion; Market Price: 1,500 shillings.

Demonseed: Anyone slain by this poison and then raised becomes possessed by a fiend (a dæmon, demon, or devil). Until the fiend is dispelled (via dispel evil or similar spell), treat the character as evil with an agenda of destruction (often achieved through guile - the fiend won't necessarily make its presence known immediately). Use all the character's normal abilities and skills. No save.
  Caster Level: 9th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, lesser planar binding; Market Price: 3,000 shillings.

Denial: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 19) or thereafter become unable to enter a 100-foot-square area designated by the creator.
  Caster Level: 13th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, forbiddance; Market Price: 4,500 shillings.

Fear: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 16) or be gripped with great fear. Treat the character as panicked for 8 rounds.
  Caster Level: 8th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, fear; Market Price: 1,600 shillings.

Fireheart: The victim suffers 3d6 points of fire damage upon the failure of each save versus the poison. There is no additional save for the fire damage.
  Caster Level: 5th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, mark of fire; Market Price: 900 shillings.

Heartthief: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 16) or lose all memory of the person closest to him.
  Caster Level: 11th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, feeblemind; Market Price: 4,000 shillings.

Longnight: Those slain by this poison or the attack which delivered it (if any) gain a special 30 Spell Resistance against any attempt to raise, resurrect (including true resurrection) or reincarnate them. No save.
  Caster Level: 17th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, soul bind; Market Price: 9,000 shillings.

Madness: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 20) or go insane as described in the spell insanity.
  Caster Level: 13th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, insanity; Market Price: 5,400 shillings.

Memory Key: This poison is always made with a specific target in mind. The creator specifies a single memory of a subject - such as meeting a certain individual, the events of a single evening, or an important password - to be destroyed forever in the victim's mind. spells, skills, feats, and other character abilities cannot be forgotten. Major memories, such as the existence of a character's husband or where she comes from, are beyond the scope of this poison. The victim gets a Fortitude save (DC 16) to resist this effect.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, feeblemind; Market Price: 1,500 shillings.

Shrivelsoul: If the victim of this poison dies (either through the poison's damage or the attack which delivered it, if any), the corpse immediately shrivels and effectively ages a year, so that raise dead will not work. A resurrection is needed to bring the character back to life. No save.
  Caster Level: 11th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, slay living; Market Price: 3,500 shillings.

Sleep: A victim of 6 Hit Dice or lower must make a Fortitude save (DC 11) or fall asleep for three minutes or until awakened.
  Caster Level: 3rd; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, sleep; Market Price: 180 shillings.

Slow: The victim of this poison must make a Will save (DC 14) or be slowed (as the spell) for 7 rounds.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, slow; Market Price: 1,100 shillings.

Swarmdeath: The victim of this poison must make a Fortitude save (DC 17) or be killed instantly by the swarm of crawling and flying insects that appears in his stomach and bursts out.
  Caster Level: 9th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, insect plague, slay living; Market Price: 2,700 shillings.

Truesleep: A victim of 10 Hit Dice or lower falls asleep for one hour. There is no saving throw (although immunity to sleep effects and normal spell resistance still apply).
  Caster Level: 9th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, greater sleep; Market Price: 2,700 shillings.

Weakening: This poison magically saps 1d4 points of Strength from the victim upon the failure of each save.
  Caster Level: 5th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, ray of enfeeblement; Market Price: 1,200 shillings.

Wraithsong: The victim of this poison has one negative level, as if touched by a wraith. No save.
  Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Manufacture Magic Poison, enervation; Market Price: 1,600 shillings.

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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

General Rules - Rage Feats

Rage Feats

This is a list of rage feats that do not appear in the Player's Handbook, but that I use in my campaigns. All of these feats require that the character have the ability to rage, as a barbarian. As feats get added to my ongoing campaigns, I will add more to this listing.

This list uses several abbreviations to show what sourcebook the entries were drawn from. For guidance as to what sourcebooks these abbreviations reference, see my key to Sourcebook Abbreviations.

All of the material contained on this page and other pages of this blog is presented in accordance with the terms of the Open Game License.

Feat Name
Source
PrerequisitesBenefit
Blood of Þunor
-
Human or Khülen, ability to rageWhen you rage, you gain bonus damage points that may be applied to your attacks
Collective Fury
-
Ability to rage, WarcryYour rage gives nearby raging allies the ability to make a Warcry
Defensive Rage
W&R
Ability to rageYou can "spend" a rage to gain a bonus to your Armor Class
Focused Rage
W&R
Ability to rageYou can "spend" a rage to gain a bonus to skill checks
Furious Strength
-
Ability to rageYou can forego normal rage bonuses for one round of tremendous strength
Fury’s Focus
-
Ability to rageYour move increases by +10 feet while you rage
Ghost Rage
W&R
Ability to rageYou can "spend" a rage to gain the ghost touch special ability for all of your attacks
Holy Fury
-
Ability to channel positive energy, ability to rageYou can channel holy energy to be able to inflict critical hits on undead while raging
Punishing Rage
W&R
Ability to rageYou can "spend" a rage to gain the Great Cleave ability for one round
Raging Jump
-
Ability to rage, Jump 3+ ranksYou can shorten your rage to enhance your ability to jump
Savage Health
-
Constitution 15+, ability to rageYou can gain temporary hit points when you rage
Unholy Rage
W&R
Ability to rage, evil alignmentYou can "spend" a rage to smite good
Unstoppable Rage
W&R
Ability to rageYou can "spend" a rage to gain a morale bonus to saving throws
Warcry
-
Charisma 13+, ability to rageYou can terrify opponents when you rage with a mighty shout
Whirlwind Rage
W&R
Ability to rage, Punishing RageYou can "spend" a rage to temporarily gain the Whirlwind Attack feat

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Sunday, December 4, 2016

House Rules - New Armor

New Armor

This is a list of armors that do not appear in the Player's Handbook, but that I use in my campaigns. As armors get added to my ongoing campaigns, I will add more to this listing. These armors have been adapted from Bow & Blade: A Guidebook to Wood Elves, Nyambe, Path of the Sword, and The Quintessential Fighter.

This list uses several abbreviations to show what sourcebook the entries were drawn from. For guidance as to what sourcebooks these abbreviations reference, see my key to Sourcebook Abbreviations.

All of the material contained on this page and other pages of this blog is presented in accordance with the terms of the Open Game License.

Armor
Light Armor
Cost
Armor/Shield
Bonus
Max Dex
Bonus
Armor Check
Penalty
Arcane Spell
Failure
Weight1
Armor Tunic2
5 shillings
+1
+8
0
0%
5 lbs.
Beaded Armor2
25 shillings
+2
+6
-1
15%
15 lbs.
Bone Armor2
300 shillings
+3
+6
-2
15%
15 lbs.
Chitin Armor2
45 shillings
+4
+3
-3
20%
25 lbs.
Gyad'hywr Breastplate2
3,000 shillings
+5
+4
-2
20%
15 lbs.
Heartwood Shirt2
1,500 shillings
+5
+4
-3
25%
25 lbs.
Heavy Cloth2
50 shillings
+2
+6
-
10%
15 lbs.
Leafweave Armor2
350 shillings
+2
+6
-2
10%
10 lbs.
Leather Cloak2
10 shillings
+1
+9
-2
0%
5 lbs.
Menaevian War Paint2
15 shillings
+1
-
-
0%
1 lb.
Moltleather Armor2
100 shillings
+3
+6
-
5%
15 lbs.
Serpent Mail2>
1,500 shillings
+5
+5
-
10%
25 lbs.
Silk Shirt2
25 shillings
-
-
-
-
- lbs.
Spidersilk Vest2
500 shillings
+3
+7
-1
5%
5 lbs.
Studded Leather Cloak
75 shillings
+2
+7
-
0%
10 lbs.
Woven Cord Armor2
10 shillings
+1
+7
-1
5%
10 lbs.
Medium Armor
Cost
Armor/Shield
Bonus
Max Dex
Bonus
Armor Check
Penalty
Arcane Spell
Failure
Weight1
Back and Breast
50 shillings
+2
+2
-5
20%
15 lbs.
Bugbear Hide
475 shillings
+4
+4
-3
20%
25 lbs.
Dragonscale
4,500 shillings
+10
+3
-4
30%
30 lbs.
Hydra Hide
1,500 shillings
+6
+4
-3
20%
25 lbs.
Iron Mantle Armor
150 shillings
+5
+2
-5
30%
30 lbs.
Lamellar
150 shillings
+5
+3
-4
30%
35 lbs.
Woodweave Coat2
1,500 shillings
+4
+3
-3
25%
15 lbs.
Heavy Armor
Cost
Armor/Shield
Bonus
Max Dex
Bonus
Armor Check
Penalty
Arcane Spell
Failure
Weight1
Bronze Plate
900 shillings
+6
+2
-5
30%
40 lbs.
Shields
Cost
Armor/Shield
Bonus
Max Dex
Bonus
Armor Check
Penalty
Arcane Spell
Failure
Weight
Buzzshield
50 shillings
+1
-
-1
10%
10 lbs.
Dragon Shield
3,000 shillings
+3
-
-
-
10 lbs.
Large chitin shield 2
10 shillings
+2
-
-2
15%
8 lbs.
Large leather shield 2
5 shillings
+2
-
-2
15%
7 lbs.
Leather body shield 2
15 shillings
+3
-
-5
25%
15 lbs.
Orc battle shield
8 shillings
+2
-
-3
25%
12 lbs.
Orc runt shield
4 shillings
+1
-
-2
15%
6 lbs.
Parrying shield2
20 shillings
+1
-
-1
10%
6 lbs.
Sleeve shield
300 shillings
+3
+3
-5
50%
8 lbs.
Small chitin shield2
2 shillings
+1
-
-1
5%
4 lbs.
Small leather shield2
4 shillings
+1
-
-1
5%
3 lbs.
Extras
Cost
Armor/Shield
Bonus
Max Dex
Bonus
Armor Check
Penalty
Arcane Spell
Failure
Weight
Roundels
50 shillings
+1
-1
-1
5%
10 lbs.
1 Weight figures are for armor sized to fit Medium characters. Armor fitted for Small characters weighs half as much, and armor fitted for Large characters weighs twice as much.
2 Can be worn or used by druids without penalty.

Armor Descriptions

Armor Tunic: Nobles, knights, and soldiers often wear armor tunics when not in combat. It is a standard cloth tunic with leather patches at the shoulders and elbows and leather covering both the front and back. The front is usually stamped with the knight or noble's coat of arms, or with the soldier's employer. An armor tunic provides some protection while still being light and flexible.

Back and Breast: This armor consists of a breast and back plate, usually worn in addition to lighter armor, thus providing an extra degree of protection at the expense of increased weight and less freedom of movement. The armor Bonus may be added to that of any light armor already being worn, transforming it to medium armor. The back and breast may be removed in 5 rounds and donned without aid in 1 minute, allowing a warrior to quickly switch between heavy protection for combat and light armor for agility, as the situation demands. Although the armor bonus from a back and breast set will stack with the armor bonus from a suit of light armor, any magical enhancement will not.

Beaded Armor: This armor is made from beads and woven leather cord. This makes the armor highly decorative, yet still provides some degree of protection to the wearer. It is most commonly used by the tribesmen of the At'viras Steppes and the Tozlu Desert. Beaded armor can be donned in 1 minute, donned hastily in 5 rounds, and removed in 1 minute.

Bone Armor: Thin strips of bone line the outside of a hide shirt, making this armor both light and durable. Although it offers excellent protection compared to most light armor, it does not have the durability of comparable metal armor.

Bronze Plate: Bronze plate is half-plate made with lighter construction, allowing greater mobility at the expense of heavy protection.

Bugbear Hide: The shell of a bugbear is renowned among armorsmiths for being unusually resilient to blows when cured and waxes in a certain fashion. Anyone wearing bugbear hide will be viewed extremely negatively by goblinoids.

Buzzshield: The buzzshield is an example of what happens when the ingenuity of the Hartzstadt dwarves is applied to war. The buzzshield is the size of a small steel shield, and anyone with the Shield proficiency can used it as one without penalty. If the wielder also has Exotic Weapon Proficiency (Buzzshield), it is something more.

The buzzshield contains a powerful spring, a complex gearing mechanism, and a number of retractable metal teeth. When wound up (a full round action that provokes and attack of opportunity), it becomes a lethal weapon, all the while still functioning as a shield. The buzzshield can be used as an off-hand weapon, and is considered to be a light weapon for this purpose. The buzzshield remains wound for 1d4+4 rounds, and deals 1d6 points of slashing damage on a successful hit. It has a threat range of 20 x3.

The mechanism is robust, as it is designed for war, but it is not indestructible. After 25 rounds of use, the mechanism will need maintenance. Maintaining a buzzshield requires a DC 20 Craft: Weaponsmithing check and 10 minutes of work. Dwarves from Harzstadt gain a +4 bonus to this check, and can perform the work in half the time. if the shield is used without maintenance, it ceases to function as anything but a small shield until repaired.

Chitin Armor: Goblinoids and others who live near insect-infested areas have learned to take advantage of the abundance of giant arthropods, forming useful armor from their discarded husks. While some feel that only shells stripped from living beasts have the flexibility to make decent armor, most husk-hunters find a freshly shed exoskeleton to be just as good and far easier to obtain.

Chitin armor offers decent protection, and is often used by goblinoids. It has one major drawback - it is incredibly brittle. Any attack that deals more than 20 points of damage in a single blow shatters the armor. In addition, if the wearer of the armor takes more than 50 points of damage before he can repair the armor, the husk is destroyed. Repairing the armor requires a DC 20 Craft: Armorsmithing check and takes an hour.

Dragon Shield: Rarer than full dragonscale, a dragon shield is made from a single huge scale, only found upon the death of large wyrms. Providing excellent protection, the dragon shield is light and easy to use despite being the size of any other large shield. In addition to the armor Bonus, the dragon shield will also bestow its wielder with energy resistance 5 against the energy type of the breath weapon the dragon scale was gleaned from.

Dragonscale: Similar to scale mail, dragonscale is made using the smaller scales of a great dragon. This armor guarantees a warrior excellent protection and yet limits little of his speed and mobility due to its great flexibility. In addition, the wearer gains energy resistance 10 against all attack of the same energy type as the breath weapon of the dragon from which the suit was made. Dragomnscale is extremely rare, and many adventurers are willing to risk the dangers of actually seeking a dragon out in order to gain such armor. Many dragons will react negatively to individuals clad in dragonscale armor.

Gyad'hywr Breastplate: This is a breastplate made from gyad'hwyr wood.

Heartwood Shirt: Made of specially treated wood grown in secret groves by khülen druids and spirit shamen, this is one of the finest and most expensive forms of armor available. Although made of wood, it has the hardness and hit points of normal steel.

Heavy Cloth: This armor consists of either thin cloth such as linen that is boiled in oil or wax to stiffen it, or thick cloth such as felt that can turn away some blows or missiles. it is hot, scratchy, and uncomfortable,

Hydra Hide: Often regarded as a poor man's dragonscale, hydra hide is nevertheless extremely tough and yet remains flexible enough to permit most movement.

Iron Mantle Armor: Iron mantle armor is made from a number of iron plates held together with leather straps, and covers the wearer's shoulders and chest. Iron mantle armor can be donned in 4 minutes, donned hastily in 1 minute, and removed in 1 minute.

Lamellar: Similar to splint and brigandine armor, lamellar has between the two in protection value, I consists of small, overlapping plates of metal sewn together or stitched to a backing of leather or cloth.

Large Chitin Shield: Commonly used by goblinoid warriors, a chitin shield is lighter than a metal or wooden shield, but easier to damage. Made from the exoskeleton on a monstrous insect, it is lightweight, but incredibly brittle. A large chitin shield has hardness 5 and 5 hit points.

Large Leather Shield: A leather shield is lighter than a metal or wooden shield, but easier to damage. The leather is cured until it is hard enough to deflect attacks. A large leather shield has hardness 3 and 12 hit points.

Leafweave Armor: Made from lacquered leaves by woodland crafters, leafweave armor is light, durable, and extremely flexible. Its only disadvantage compared to other light armor is its high price, due mainly to the intricate craftsmanship and rare materials used in its creation.

Leather Body Shield: A body shield is only slightly smaller than a tower shield. Such a shield would be unwieldy if made from any material other than leather. The leather is cured until it is hard enough to deflect attacks. A large leather shield has hardness 3 and 15 hit points.

Leather Cloak: This full-length thick leather cape trades off a minimal protective value with the benefit of minimal encumbrance of the wearer.

Menævian War Paint: The warriors of Menævia have been often observed patrolling their wild nation covered in swirls and whorls of color. Those who know the secret of Menævian war paint know why they wear this gaudy spectacle, except for the fact that they are most likely dead.

When applied, Menævian war paint is a riot of clashing colors, usually greens, reds, and tans. It remains thus until the wearer remains still for 1d4 rounds. At the end of this time, the brightly colored paint slowly changes to match the surrounding foliage - not a perfect match, but close enough to add considerably to Hide checks, giving a +6 circumstance bonus. If the wearer moves suddenly - more than half speed - the paint reverts to its bright color scheme. The effect is that brightly painted, garish warriors seem to materialize out of nowhere.

Menævian war paint also serves to protect the skin slightly. Once dry, it is surprisingly tough, acting as skin-tight armor that provides a +1 armor bonus to its wearer. Applying Menævian war paint takes 15 minutes; removing it takes about 1 minute. No other armor can be worn while using the paint. It is extremely rare for Menævians to sell this paint to non-Menævians. An alchemist who has a sample to work with might be able to figure out the recipe with a DC 35 Craft: Alchemy check. Once the formula is known, manufacturing more requires a DC 25 Craft: Alchemy check.

Menævian war paint assists in Hide checks only when in wilderness locales. It is worse than useless in cities or inside structures, conferring a -2 circumstance penalty to Hide checks.

Moltleather Armor: This material for this armor is made from molted lizardfolk skin using shaping (alchemy) and treating it with special substances. It is then treated a second time using shaping (leatherworking) to layer and thicken the material into superior leather. Moltleather armor is usually given to lizardfolk warriors as a special gift and it is difficult to find commercially as the lizardfolk do not sell it.

Most suits of moltleather are fitted to lizardfolk specifications and require substantial alteration before they can be worn by creatures of a different race, even if they are the same size. These modifications will cost 25 shillings and require a DC 20 Craft: Armorsmithing check by an artisan who has at least 4 ranks in both Craft: Armorsmithing and Craft: Leatherworking.

Orc Battle Shield: The orcish battle shield is a heavy wooden shield, usually reinforced with bronze or iron. Cruder and heavier than shields made by other races, it is an effective but cumbersome means of protection. orc battle shields are often adorned with shield spikes, orc shield blades, or both.

Orc Runt Shield: The orc runt shield is a smaller wooden shield that may or may not be reinforced with stripes of metal. These are often wielded by the lower status orcs or even slaves driven into battle by their orcish masters.

Parrying Shield: A parrying shield is a special shield often used by the inhabitants of the Tozlu Desert. It is a small leather shield with special projections used for deflecting arrows. A wielder must have the Parrying Shield feat to make full use of a parrying shield. A parrying shield has hardness 3 and 9 hit points.

Roundels: Consisting of a series of discs attached to the vulnerable joints of metal armor, roundels provide a greater level of protection at the expense of extra weight. Roundels may be combined with any medium or heavy armor with the exception of full plate.

Serpent Mail: This masterwork armor is made from the skins of great serpents bred specially for this purpose. Like moltleather, serpent mail is nonmagical but is treated with magical processes during its making. Serpent mail is given as a gift to particularly notable lizardfolk warriors, and is difficult to find commercially as the lizardfolk do not sell it.

Most suits of serpent mail are fitted to lizardfolk specifications and require substantial alteration before they can be worn by creatures of a different race, even if they are the same size. These modifications will cost 100 shillings and require a DC 25 Craft: Armorsmithing check by an artisan who has at least 8 ranks in both Craft: Armorsmithing and Craft: Leatherworking.

Silk Shirt: Often sported by fashion-conscious fops and nobles, silk armor has a very real purpose in combat. Though it does not bestow any Armor Bonus, it may be combined with any other type of armor with no penalty. When the wearer is struck with any piercing ranged weapon, the silk naturally wraps itself around the head of the weapon, making removal far easier. Any Heal check applied to the effects of damage dealt by ranged piercing weapons will gain a +2 circumstance bonus.

Sleeve Shield: These shields are crafted of steel and somewhat resemble vambraces from a suit of plate armor. The front plates, both on the forearm and the upper arm, are exceptionally wide - somewhere in size between a buckler and a small shield - and can deflect enemy blows. A blade very much like a short sword extends from the gauntlet. Intricate linkages and hinging allows the arm to bend, but sleeve shields do still hamper the wearer. in addition, the built-in blades preclude the use of any other weapons or shields - including bucklers - in the hand.

Sleeve shields are used both for defense - adding +3 to the wearer's Armor Class - and for attacks, in which capacity they are identical to a short sword. As beneficial as this seems, the main benefit of sleeve shields is that any melee attack that fails to hit the wearer by 3 points or less is assumed to have been deflected by the sleeves. This allows the wearer to make an immediate attack of opportunity against the attacker.

The listed abilities are for a matched pair of sleeves. If a character wears only one sleeve, the Armor Class bonus falls to +1 and the wearer gets an attack of opportunity only if the attacker misses by 1 point. Wearing only one sleeve allows the character to wield a two-handed weapon or shield in the other hand. Maximum Dexterity Bonus, Armor Check, and Spell Failure modifiers remain unchanged. The use of sleeve shields is popular among dwarves from Hartzstadt, which is where these weapons were first developed.

Small Chitin Shield: Commonly used by goblinoid warriors, a chitin shield is lighter than a metal or wooden shield, but easier to damage. Made from the exoskeleton on a monstrous insect, it is lightweight, but incredibly brittle.A small chitin shield has hardness 5 and 3 hit points.

Small Leather Shield: A leather shield is lighter than a metal or wooden shield, but easier to damage. The leather is cured until it is hard enough to deflect attacks. A small leather shield has hardness 3 and 7 hit points.

Spidersilk Vest: It is well known that spider's silk is many times stronger than steel. While the chitine have been known to farm spiders for their silk, others must resort to hunting monstrous spiders in wild for their supply. Any monstrous spider of at least Large size can provide enough silk for a single spidersilk vest for a Medium-size creature. A DC 30 Craft: Weaving check is required to convert the spider threads into silk cloth, and a DC 27 Craft: Tailor check is needed to successfully craft the silk into the vest.

Studded Leather Cloak: This leather cape includes large metal rivets to help turn the blows of weapons.

Woodweave Coat: Made from wooden strips of specially treated wood, this armor is favored by many khülen woodsmen and warriors. Although made of wood, it has the hardness and hit points of normal steel.

Woven Cord Armor: This armor is made from woven fibers. Though not as flexible as leather armor, woven cord armor offers superior ventilation. As a result, woven cord armor is commonly used by the denizens of the At'viras Steppes, and sometimes by the inhabitants of the Tozlu Desert. Woven cord armor can be donned in 1 minute, donned hastily in 5 rounds, and removed in 1 minute.

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House Rules - Adventuring Equipment

Adventuring Equipment

Item
Cost
Weight
Firesand Lamp
25 shillings
6 lbs.
Horserat Bridle
4 shillings
2 lbs.
Horserat Saddle
60 shillings
40 lbs.
Javelin Thrower
2 shillings
2 lbs.
Potion Belt
1 shilling
1 lb.
Potion Belt, Masterwork
60 shillings
1 lb.
Raskit
100 shillings
3 lb.
Scroll Organizer
5 shillings
½ lb.
Shell Pouch
Variable
1 lb. to 4 lbs.
Slytheen Bog Wine, Clay Urn
60 shillings
15 lb.
Slytheen Bog Wine, Cup
1 shilling
¼ lb.
Tar Pot
200 shillings
20 lbs.
Weapon Harness
5 shillings
5 lbs.
This is a collection of equipment that is generally of interest to adventurers. There are no weapons or armor listed here, nor are there items that are specific to either arcane or divine spellcasters. Rather, these items are general-purpose gear that many characters will find useful to carry. This list does not include many items of interest to rogues, as those are found on the Black Market Items and Poisons page.

This list uses several abbreviations to show what sourcebook the entries were drawn from. For guidance as to what sourcebooks these abbreviations reference, see my key to Sourcebook Abbreviations.

All of the material contained on this page and other pages of this blog is presented in accordance with the terms of the Open Game License.

Item Descriptions

Firesand Lamp: (Vigil Watch: Warrens of the Ratmen) These lamps burn firesand to create light. The intricately designed lamps carefully regulate the amount of air feeding the sand to control the rate of burn. A pint of firesand fuels one of these lamps for an hour.

Horserat Bridle: (Vigil Watch: Warrens of the Ratmen) One of the horserat's primary means of attack is biting, so a horselike bridle - with a bit that fits inside the mouth - is out of the question. Instead, a horserat is fitted with a metal or leather plate that comes over the top of its head, very much like a helmet. carefully fitted straps hold it in place, and the reins are affixed to rings set on either side of the plate. While this arrangement does not give a rider quite as much control as an ordinary bit and bridle, it does preserve the animal's ability to fight effectively.

Horserat Saddle: (Vigil Watch: Warrens of the Ratmen) Horserat saddles are broad and soft, lacking both pommel and stirrups common to horse saddles. Instead, two sets of wooden pegs extend from the sides. Riders do not sit astride these animal with their legs dangling as they might on a horse. Instead, a horserat rider hooks his knees over the first set of pegs - those near the front of the saddle - and bends his legs backward to hook his ankles over the second set of pegs, set high and far back, close to the rider's bottom. The practical result is that it takes a full-round action to mount or dismount the beast, but it proves virtually impossible to unseat the rider, requiring a DC 27 check to do so. This position allows the rider to remain mounted even when the animal is climbing vertically up or down or making its astonishing leaps and pin attacks.

Javelin Thrower: (Nyambe) This ancient weapon provides greater leverage to thrown javelins, increasing their range and power. The javelin thrower is a grooved stick with a notch at one end used for propelling javelins, throwing spears, or barbed spears. To use the thrower, a javelin is loaded into the groove, and the user swings the stick with an overhand throwing motion, flinging the weapon forward with much more force than is possible with an unassisted throw.

Using a javelin thrower doubles the range increment of the javelin or spear used, increases its threat range to 19-20, and increases its critical multiplier by one step. Loading a javelin thrower is a move-equivalent action, and using one to throw a javelin is a standard action, which prevents skilled throwers from making multiple attacks.

Potion Belt: (Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting) This sturdy leather belt similar to a bandoleer has pockets shaped to hold potion vials and is fitted with ties or flaps to keep the potions from falling out. The belt holds six potions. Retrieving a potion from a potion belt is a free action once per round. Craft: Leatherworking DC: 15.

Potion Belt, Masterwork: (Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting) This extremely well-made potion belt holds ten potions. Retrieving a potion from a potion belt is a free action once per round. Craft: Leatherworking DC: 20.

Raskit: (Vigil Watch: Warrens of the Ratmen) The raskit is a long-necked, nine-stringed musical instrument with a number of varying-sized bells set into its face. it is not played by plucking the strings, but instead by stroking them vertically. This sets up sympathetic reverberations, which cause a harmonic vibration in the tiny bells set in the face of the instrument. All but the most dexterous musicians find this surprisingly subtle and beautiful instrument difficult tom play properly, and it imposes a -4 penalty to all Perform checks made to play it.

Scroll Organizer: (Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting) This long strip of leather has an overlapping series of fifteen pockets sewn along one side, each large enough to hold a scroll of a single spell. When slipped into a pocket, only the top of the scroll shows, allowing you to scan the scroll's titles. Craft: Leatherworking DC: 15.

Shell Pouch: (Vigil Watch: Warrens of the Ratmen) Most races wear leather or cloth purses and pouches to carry their wealth and small items of value, but marsh-dwelling races find that these materials deteriorate too quickly in the swampy environment. Instead, they fashion secured receptacles from the shells of turtles. They line the shells with metal - copper being the most common choice - and close one end. The other end they cap with a hinged metal lid. The more ornate and expensive shell pouches are lined with silver or gold, secured with a complex lock set in the lid, and exquisitely carved and engraved. Marshlanders hang smaller shell pouches from the belt, while larger ones are slung over the shoulders on straps or fine chains. These items vary wildly in cost, but the most common ones are generally worth between 1 and 5 shillings. More ornate and decorated shell pouches can be worth hundreds or even thousands of shillings.

Slytheen Bog Wine: (Vigil Watch: Warrens of the Ratmen) The slytheen distill their powerful alcohol from the same black bracket fungus as the blackwind poison. They pulp the fungus and mix it with a number of other ingredients - some say horserat urine among them - and place it in large clay urns, which they bury in peat bogs. A year or more later they unearth the jars and enjoy the potent, black liquor. Each nest has its own recipes and wage fierce rivalries with one another over whose wine is best. For each glass imbibed the drinker must make a Fortitude save with a DC of 4 per cup consumed, cumulative. A failure indicates the drinker suffers a 1d2 point reduction to each ability score as she becomes increasingly inebriated. A drinker who rolls a natural 1 on a save passes out.

Tar Pot: This is often used by orcs and other creatures sensitive to daylight to put a pall of smoke between themselves and the sun's disorienting rays when fighting in the open. Tar pots are simple, successful solutions to the problem, and it is not uncommon for a surface force to carry scores of them.

A tar pot is a heavy iron device resembling a crude furnace. In battle, the pot is filled with tar and sawdust and lit. The thick iron shell lets in just enough air to keep the mixture smoldering and belching black smoke, shrouding the battlefield in a toxic, artificial dusk after only a few minutes.

One tar pot creatures an area of smoke identical to the cloud of an obscuring mist spell and also blocks the effects of sunlight on creatures with light sensitivity, including the effects of a daylight spell. Unless the fire is extinguished, a tar pot produces smoke for 10 rounds before it needs more fuel. The radius of the smoke cloud expands at a rate of 10 feet per round, to a maximum of 100 feet. The smoke then dissipates normally. Craft: Blacksmithing DC: 20. Weight: 20 lbs.

Weapon Harness: (Path of the Sword) This lightweight harness slips over the user's backpack and over the arms. It has two chest belts (one directly below the chest, the other across the chest) that must be secured lest the harness fall off. The harness has sheathes for two swords on the back, as well as two hooks that snap together and hold two Medium-size weapons on the waist. There is also a sheath on the from of the weapon harness, and six sheathes along the front straps hold daggers. Craft: Leatherworking DC: 15.

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