Saturday, August 31, 2013

Campaign Design - Base Classes: Duskblade

Duskblade
(adapted from the Player's Handbook II)

The duskblade blurs the line between spell caster and warrior, marrying the power of magic with combat prowess. A student of ancient alvari spell casting techniques, the duskblade combines arcane spell casting with the combat skills of a fighter, melding them together to form an mystical warrior suited to the alvari mantra that arcane power is the key to everything. Most duskblades are from the conjuration, evocation, or transmutation birth schools, but alvari of all birth schools have been known to take up the sword and become duskblades.

Abilities: Your Charisma and Strength scores should be as high as possible, since your spell casting and melee combat depend upon them. Your Constitution is also important, because you need all the hit points you can get.
Race: Alvari.
Alignment: Any.
Hit Die: d8.
Luck Die: (d4 + 1).

Class Skills
  • Skill List: The duskblade's class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft: Any (all skills taken individually) (Int), Decipher Script (Int), Jump (Str), Knowledge: Any (all skills taken individually) (Int), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), Spellcraft (Int), and Swim (Str).
  • Note: Because the Three Worlds campaign uses the Skills by Character house rule, the list of class skills given here is only included for the sake of completeness, and is not used by characters in the campaign setting.
  • Skill Points at 1st Level: (2 + Intelligence modifier) x 4.
  • Skill Points at Each Additional Class Level: 2 + Intelligence modifier.
Class Features
All of the following are class features of the duskblade:
  • Base Attack Bonus: Good. A duskblade gains +1 base attack bonus per class level.

  • Fortitude Base Save Bonus: Good. A duskblade gains a +2½ base Fortitude save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Fortitude save bonus per class level.

  • Reflex Base Save Bonus: Poor. A duskblade gains +13 base Reflex save bonus per class level.

  • Will Base Save Bonus: Good. A duskblade gains a +2½ base Will save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Will save bonus per class level.

  • Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Duskblades are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, as well as all armor and shields (except tower shields).

  • Spells: Duskblades cast arcane spells, which are drawn from the duskblade spell list. They can cast any spell they know without preparing it ahead of time. To learn or cast a spell, a duskblade must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level (Charisma 10 for 0th-level spells, Charisma 11 for 1st-level spells, and so forth). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against your spell is 10 + spell level + your Charisma modifier.

    Half of a duskblade's spells known at each spell level must be drawn from their alvari birth school, unless they already know all of the spells available from their birth school for that spell level, in which case they may select any spells on the list regardless of birth school. A duskblade can only cast a certain number of spells of each spell level per day. A duskblade's base daily spell allotment is given below. In addition, a duskblade receives bonus spells per day if they have a high Charisma score.

  • Spells Known: A duskblade begin play knowing two 0th-level spells and two 1st-level spells, chosen from the duskblade spell list. A duskblade also knows one additional 0th-level spell for each point of Charisma bonus. Each time a duskblade gain a new class level, they learn one additional spell of any level they can cast, chosen from the duskblade spell list.

    Upon reaching 5th-level, and at every subsequent odd-numbered level, a duskblade can choose to learn a new spell in place of one they already know. In effect, they lose access to the old spell in exchange for gaining the new one. The new spell's level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least two levels lower than the highest-level spell the duskblade can cast. A duskblade can only swap a single spell at any given level and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that they gain new spells known for the level.

    A duskblade need not prepare spells in advance. They can cast any spell they know at any time, assuming they have not yet used up your spells per day for that spell level.

  • Arcane Battle Mastery: A duskblade gains the Arcane Battle Mastery feat for free, even if they do not meet the prerequisites for the feat.

  • Armored Mage (Ex): Normally, armor of any type interferes with an arcane spell caster's gestures, which can cause spells to fail if those spells have a somatic component. A duskblade's limited focus and specialized training, however, allows you to avoid arcane spell failure as long as you stick to light armor and small shields or bucklers. This training does not extend to medium or heavy armors, nor to large shields. This ability does not apply to spells gained from a different spell casting class.

    At 4th-level, you learn to use medium armor with no chance of arcane spell failure. At 7th-level, you learn to use a large shield with no chance of arcane spell failure.

  • Arcane Training: At 2nd-level, a duskblade may choose to gain either Arcane Weapon or Combat Casting as a bonus feat.

  • Arcane Battle Channeling (Su): At 3rd-level, a duskblade gains the Arcane Battle Channeling feat for free, even if they do not meet the prerequisites for the feat.

  • Quick Cast: Beginning at 5th-level, you can cast one spell each day as a swift action, so long as the casting time of the spell is 1 standard action or less. You can use this ability twice per day at 10th-level, three times per day at 15th-level, and four times per day at 20th-level.

  • Arcane Battle Feats: At 6th-level, 11th-level, 16th-level, and 18th-level, a duskblade gains a bonus feat that they may use for any Arcane Battle feat. The duskblade must meet all of the prerequisites of the selected feat.

  • Improved Arcane Channeling: At 13th-level, a duskblade gains the Improved Arcane Channeling feat for free, even if he does not meet the prerequisites for the feat.

Duskblade

Level
Special
0th
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
1st
Arcane Battle Mastery, armored mage (light)
3
2
-
-
-
-
2nd
Arcane Training
4
3
-
-
-
-
3rd
Arcane Battle Channeling
5
4
-
-
-
-
4th
Armored mage (medium)
6
5
-
-
-
-
5th
Quick cast 1/day
6
5
2
-
-
-
6th
Arcane Battle Feat
6
6
3
-
-
-
7th
Armored mage (heavy shield)
6
6
5
-
-
-
8th
-
6
7
6
-
-
-
9th
-
6
7
6
2
-
-
10th
Quick cast 2/day
6
8
7
3
-
-
11th
Arcane Battle Feat
6
8
7
5
-
-
12th
-
6
8
8
6
-
-
13th
Improved Arcane Channeling
6
9
8
6
2
-
14th
-
6
9
8
7
3
-
15th
Quick cast 3/day
6
9
8
7
5
-
16th
Arcane Battle Feat
6
9
9
8
6
-
17th
-
6
10
9
8
6
2
18th
Arcane Battle Feat
6
10
9
8
7
3
19th
-
6
10
10
9
7
5
20th
Quick cast 4/day
6
10
10
10
8
6

Home     Base Classes

Campaign Design - Base Classes: Spellthief

Spellthief
(from Complete Adventurer)

Spellthieves are changelings who use skill and arcane magic to drain the abilities of their opponents and turn their foes' own powers against them. Because they have such a wide variety of abilities, spellthieves can adapt themselves to overcoming nearly any challenge, but they have neither the overpowering arcane might of wizards or sorcerers, nor the brute force of fighters. Their versatility is what makes spellthieves so valuable to the politically powerful alvari families in the vicious infighting among the Pilosian city-states, but it is also what makes so many of the changelings so dangerous to their alvari patrons.

Abilities: Charisma determines which spells a spellthief can cast and how hard those spells are to resist. Dexterity helps him avoid blows in combat despite his light armor. Spellthieves who prefer melee combat benefit from high Strength and Constitution scores.
Race: Undefined.
Alignment: Any.
Hit Die: d6.
Luck Die: d8.

Class Skills
  • Skill List: The spellthief's class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int), Bluff (Cha), Concentration (Con), Craft: Any (Int), Decipher Script (Int), Disable Device (Int), Escape Artist (Dex), Gather Information (Cha), Hide (Dex), Jump (Str), Knowledge: Arcana (Int), Knowledge: Local (Int), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Open Lock (Dex), Search (Int), Speak Language (m/a), Spellcraft (Int), Spot (Wis), Swim (Str), Tumble (Dex), and Use Magic Device (Cha).
  • Note: Because the Three Worlds campaign uses the Skills by Character house rule, the list of class skills given here is only included for the sake of completeness, and is not used by characters in the campaign setting.
  • Skill Points at 1st Level: (6 + Intelligence modifier) x 4.
  • Skill Points at Each Additional Class Level: 6 + Intelligence modifier.
Class Features
All of the following are class features of the spellthief:
  • Base Attack Bonus: Average. A spellthief gains +¾ base attack bonus per class level.

  • Fortitude Base Save Bonus: Poor. A spellthief gains +13 base Fortitude save bonus per class level.

  • Reflex Base Save Bonus: Poor. A spellthief gains +13 base Reflex save bonus per class level.

  • Will Base Save Bonus: Good. A spellthief gains a +2½ base Will save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Will save bonus per class level.

  • Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Spellthieves are proficient with all simple weapons, and with light armor, but not with shields. Because the somatic components required for spellthief spells are simple, a spellthief can cast spellthief spells while wearing light armor without incurring the normal arcane spell failure chance. However, a spellthief wearing medium or heavy armor or using a shield incurs a chance of arcane spell failure as normal if the spell in question has a somatic component. A multiclass spellthief incurs the normal arcane spell failure chance for arcane spells received from other classes, including those stolen from arcane casters.

  • Spells: Beginning at 4th level, a spellthief gains the ability to cast a small number of arcane spells, which are drawn from a subset of the sorcerer/wizard spell list. He can cast any spell he knows without preparing it ahead of time, just as a sorcerer can. To learn or cast a spell, a spellthief must have a Charisma score equal to at least 10 + the spell level (Charisma 11 for 1st level spells, Charisma 12 for 2nd level spells , and so on). The DC for a saving throw against a spellthief's spell is 10 + spell level + the spellthief's Charisma modifier. His caster level is one-half his spellthief class level. Like other spell casters, a spellthief can cast only a certain number of spell's of each spell level per day. His base daily spell allotment is given on the table below. In addition, he receives bonus spells per day if he has a high Charisma score. When the table indicates that a spellthief gets 0 spells per day of a given spell level, he gains only the bonus spells he would be entitled to based on his Charisma score for that spell level. A spellthief's spell selection is extremely limited. A spellthief begins play knowing no spells but gains one or more new spells at certain levels, as indicated on the table below. (Unlike spells per day, his Charisma score does not affect the number of spells he knows). A spellthief can learn any sorcerer/wizard spells from the following schools: abjuration, divination, enchantment, illusion, and transmutation. No other sorcerer/wizard spells are on the spellthief's class spell list. Upon reaching 12th level, and at every third level after that, a spellthief can choose to learn a new spell in place of one he already knows. In effect, the spellthief “loses” the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell's level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least two levels lower than the highest-level spellthief spell that the spellthief can cast. A spellthief can swap only a single spell of any given level, and he must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that he gains new spells known for the level.

  • Sneak Attack (Ex): A spellthief deals an extra 1d6 points of damage when flanking an opponent or at any time when the target would be denied its Dexterity bonus. This extra damage applies to ranged attacks only if target is within 30 feet. It increases to 2d6 points at 5th level, 3d6 points at 9th level, 4d6 points at 13th level, and 5d6 points at 17th level. If the spellthief gains sneak attack damage from another source (such as rogue levels), the bonuses on damage stack.

  • Steal Spell (Su): A spellthief can siphon spell energy away from his target and use it himself. A spellthief who hits an opponent with a successful sneak attack can choose to forgo dealing 1d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead steal a spell, or the potential to cast a specific known spell, from his target. If the target is willing, a spellthief can steal a spell with a touch as a standard action. The target of a steal spell attack loses one 0th-level or 1st-level spell from memory if she prepares spells ahead of time, or one 0th-level or 1st-level slot if she is a spontaneous caster. A spontaneous caster also loses the ability to cast the stolen spell for 1 minute. If the target has no spells prepared (or has no remaining spell slots, if she is a spontaneous caster), this ability has no effect. A spellthief can choose which spell to steal; otherwise the DM determines the stolen spell randomly. If a spellthief tries to steal a spell that isn't available, the stolen spell (or spell slot) is determined randomly from among those the target has available. After stealing a spell, a spellthief can cast the spell himself on a subsequent turn. Treat the spell as if it were cast by the original owner of the spell for the purpose of determining caster level, save DC, and so forth. A spellthief can cast this spell even if he doesn't have the minimum ability score normally required to cast a spell of that level. The spellthief must supply the same components (including verbal, somatic, material, XP, and any focus) required for the stolen spell. Alternatively, a spellthief of 4th level or higher can use the stolen spell power to cast any spellthief spell that he knows of the same level or lower (effectively this gives the spellthief one free casting of a known spell). A spellthief must cast a stolen spell (or use its energy to cast one of his own spells) within 1 hour of stealing it; otherwise the extra spell energy fades harmlessly away. As a spellthief gains levels, he can choose to steal higher level spells. At 4th level, he can steal spells of up to 2nd level, and for every two levels gained after 4th, the maximum spell level stolen increases by one (up to a maximum of 9th level spells at 18th level). At any one time, a spellthief can possess a a maximum number of stolen spell levels equal to his class levels (treat 0th-level spells at ½ level for this purpose). If he steals a spell that would cause him to exceed this limit, he must choose to lose stolen spells sufficient to reduce his total number of stolen spell levels to no more than his maximum. A spellthief can't apply metamagic feats or other effects to the stolen spell unless the specific spell stolen was prepared with such an effect. This ability only works against spells. It has no effect on psionic powers or spell-like abilities (but see the steal spell-like ability class feature below).

  • Trapfinding (Ex): A spellthief can use the Search skill to locate traps with a DC higher than 20, and he can use Disable Device to bypass a trap or disarm magic traps.

  • Detect Magic (Sp): A spellthief of 2nd level or higher can use detect magic a number of times equal to his Charisma bonus, if any (minimum 1). His caster level is equal to his spellthief class level.

  • Spellgrace (Su): A spellthief of 2nd level or higher gains a +1 competence bonus on his saves against spells. This bonus improves to +2 at 11th level, and to +3 at 20th level.

  • Steal Spell Effect (Su): Beginning at 2nd level, a spellthief can siphon an active spell effect from another creature. A spellthief who hits an opponent with a sneak attack can forgo dealing 1d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead gain the effect of a single spell affecting the target. If the target is willing, a spellthief can steal a spell effect with a touch as a standard action. The spellthief can choose which spell effect to steal; otherwise the DM determines the stolen spell effect randomly. If a spellthief tries to steal a spell effect that isn't present, the stolen spell effect is determined randomly from among those currently in effect on the target. A spellthief can't steal a spell effect if its caster level exceeds his class level + his Charisma modifier. Upon stealing a spell effect, a spellthief gains the stolen effect (and the original creature loses that effect) for 1 minute per class level (or until the spell's duration expires, whichever comes first). If the spell effect's duration hasn't expired by this time, the spell effect returns to the creature that originally benefited from it. A spellthief can steal the effect of a spell only if the spell could be cast on him by the original caster. For example, a spellthief couldn't gain the effect of an animal growth spell (unless the spellthief is of the animal type) or the effect of a shield spell (since that spell's range is personal). Of a spellthief tries to steal the effect of a spell not allowed to him, the effect is still suppressed on the original target of the spell for 1 minute per spellthief class level.

  • Steal Energy Resistance (Su): Beginning at 3rd level, a spellthief can siphon off some or all of a target's resistence to an energy type (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic). A spellthief who hits an opponent with a successful sneak attack can choose to forgo dealing 1d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead temporarily gain resistance 10 to an energy type to which his target is resistant (or immune). If the target is willing, a spellthief can steal energy resistance with a touch as a standard action. Simultaneously, the target creature's resistance to that energy type is reduced by 10 (to a minimum of 0). A creature with immunity to an energy type retains that immunity. If his target has more than one type of resistance to energy, the spellthief can choose which kind to steal; otherwise the DM determines the stolen resistance randomly from among those possessed by the target. If a spellthief chooses to steal a type of resistance the target doesn't posses, the stolen type of resistance is determined randomly from those possessed by the target. The resistance the spellthief gains from using this ability lasts for 1 minute. If the resistance is derived from a temporary effect (such as a spell), the stolen resistance disappears when the effect expires. A spellthief can use this ability multiple times, but its effects do not stack unless they apply to different types of energy. For example, throughout a long combat, a spellthief might use this ability to gain resistance to fire and resistance to cold, but could not use it twice on a creature that is resistant to fire to gain twice as much resistance to fire or to reduce the creature's resistance to fire by twice as much. At 11th level, a spellthief can steal resistance 20 to an energy type by using this ability, and at 19th level, he can steal resistance 30 of an energy type.

  • Steal Spell-Like Ability (Su): At 5th level and higher, a spellthief can use a sneak attack to temporarily steal a creature's spell-like ability. A spellthief who hits an opponent with a sneak attack can choose to forgo 1d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead gain one use of one of the target's spell-like abilities. If the target is willing, a spellthief can steal a spell-like ability with a touch as a standard action. This spell-like ability can originate from the target's class, race, template, or any other source, and can be of any level, up to a maximum of one-third the spellthief's class level. A spellthief can select a specific spell-like ability to steal; otherwise the DM chooses the ability at random. If the ability had a limited number of uses per day, the target must have at least one such use left, or the spellthief can't steal the ability. If the target can't use its ability at the present time (such as a summoned demon's summon ability), the spellthief can't steal it. A spellthief can a stolen spell-like ability once. For all purposes, caster level, save DC, and so on, treat the spell-like ability as if it were being used by the original possessor of the ability. A spellthief must use the stolen spell-like ability within 1 minute of acquiring it, or it is lost harmlessly. Until the spellthief uses the ability (or until the minute elapses), the target cannot use the stolen ability.

  • Absorb Spell (Su): Beginning at 7th level, if a spellthief makes a successful save against a spell that targets him, he can attempt to absorb the spell's energy for later use. This ability affects only spells that have the spellthief as a target, and not effect or area spells. A spellthief can't absorb a spell of a higher spell level than he could steal with his steal spell ability. To absorb a spell that targets him, a spellthief must succeed on a level check (1d20 + spellthief class level) against a DC of 10 + the spell's caster level. Failure indicates that the spell has its normal effect. Success means that the spellthief suffers no effect from the spell and can cast the spell later (or use its energy to cast one of his own spells known) as if he had stolen the spell with his steal spell ability. His normal limit of total spell levels stolen still applies. At 20th level or higher, a spellthief can choose to use the stolen spell energy as an immediate action either to recast the original spell or to cast on of his own spells known using the stolen spell energy.

  • Arcane Sight (Sp): Beginning at 9th level, a spellthief can use arcane sight as a swift action a number of times per day equal to his Charisma modifier (minimum 1). His caster level is equal to his spellthief class level.

  • Discover Spells (Ex): A spellthief of 13th level or higher who steals a spell from a spell caster with his steal spell ability automatically learns the names of all other spells prepared or known by the spell caster that are of the same spell level as the stolen spell. This knowledge allows the spellthief to better choose which spells to steal on subsequent attacks.

  • Steal Spell Resistance (Su): Beginning at 15th level, a spellthief can use a sneak attack to temporarily steal some or all of a creature's spell resistance. A spellthief who hits an opponent with a sneak attack can choose to forgo 3d6 points of sneak attack damage and instead reduce the target's spell resistance equal to 5 + his class level (up to a maximum value equal to the original spell resistance of the target). If the target is willing, a spellthief can steal spell resistance with a touch as a standard action. The stolen spell resistance benefits the spellthief for a number of rounds equal to the spellthief's Charisma modifier (minimum one round) and then returns to the target creature. If the spell resistance derived from a temporary effect (such as a spell), the stolen resistance disappears when the effect elapses. A spellthief can't use this ability on the same creature again until the creature's stolen spell resistance returns.
Spellthief                                                        Spells per Day
Level
Special
1st2nd3rd4th
1st
Sneak attack +1d6, steal spell (0th or 1st), trapfinding
-
-
-
-
2nd
Detect magic, spellgrace +1, steal spell effect
-
-
-
-
3rd
Steal energy resistance 10
-
-
-
-
4th
Steal spell (2nd)
0
-
-
-
5th
Sneak attack +2d6, steal spell-like ability
0
-
-
-
6th
Steal spell (3rd)
1
-
-
-
7th
Absorb spell
1
-
-
-
8th
Steal spell (4th)
1
0
-
-
9th
Arcane sight, sneak attack +3d6
1
0
-
-
10th
Steal spell (5th)
1
1
-
-
11th
Spellgrace +2, steal energy resistance 20
1
1
0
-
12th
Steal spell (6th)
1
1
1
-
13th
Discover spells, sneak attack +4d6
1
1
1
-
14th
Steal spell (7th)
2
1
1
0
15th
Steal spell resistance
2
1
1
1
16th
Steal spell (8th)
2
2
1
1
17th
Sneak attack +5d6
2
2
2
1
18th
Steal spell (9th)
3
2
2
1
19th
Steal energy resistance 30
3
3
3
2
20th
Absorb spell (immediate casting), spellgrace +3
3
3
3
3

Spells Known
Level1st2nd3rd4th
1st----
2nd----
3rd----
4th21---
5th2---
6th3---
7th3---
8th421--
9th42--
10th43--
11th4321-
12th443-
13th443-
14th44421
15th4443
16th4443
17th5444
18th5544
19th5554
20th5555
1Provided that the spellthief has sufficient Charisma to have a bonus spell of this level.

Home     Base Classes

Friday, August 30, 2013

Campaign Design - Base Classes: Voják

Voják
(from Complete Warrior; originally the Samurai class)

Known for their matchless bravery and strict code of honor, the voják are the elite vyšotek soldiers of the šotek hive queens. The reputation of voják for being tenacious in combat often precedes them in battle, and their mere presence is often enough to make dishonorable enemies slink away in the darkness.

Abilities: Strength is of paramount importance to the sword-wielding voják, and Dexterity and Constitution help her survive in the midst of battle. Many of the voják's other class features depend upon Charisma - a voják's force of personality can make her enemies quake in fear.

Race: Vyšotek (Hobgoblin).
Alignment: Any lawful.
Hit Die: d10.
Luck Die: d4.

Class Skills
  • Skill List: The voják's class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con), Craft: Any (all skills taken individually) (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge: History (Int), Knowledge: Nobility and Royalty (Int), Ride (Dex), and Sense Motive (Wis).
  • Note: Because the Three Worlds campaign uses the Skills by Character house rule, the list of class skills given here is only included for the sake of completeness, and is not used by characters in the campaign setting.
  • Skill Points at 1st Level: (2 + Intelligence modifier) x 4.
  • Skill Points at Each Additional Class Level: 2 + Intelligence modifier.

Class Features
All of the following are class features of the voják:
  • Base Attack Bonus: Good. A voják gains +1 base attack bonus per class level.

  • Fortitude Base Save Bonus: Good. A voják gains a +2½ base Fortitude save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Fortitude save bonus per class level.

  • Reflex Base Save Bonus: Poor. A voják gains +13 Base Reflex save bonus per class level.

  • Will Base Save Bonus: Poor. A voják gains +13 base Will save bonus per class level.

  • Weapon and Armor Proficiency: A voják is proficient with all simple and martial weapons, and with all types of armor, but not with shields.

  • Daisho Proficiency (Ex): In melee combat, a voják favors the vardatch (almost always a masterwork crafted vardatch) and the butterfly sword (usually a masterwork butterfly sword). Many voják receive a set of these two blades from their hive queen to use in her service. Because a voják is trained in their use, she gains the feats Exotic Weapon Proficiency: Vardatch and Exotic Weapon Proficiency: Butterfly Sword as bonus feats.

  • Two Swords as One (Ex): At 2nd level, a voják has learned to wield the vardatch and butterfly sword together. She is treated as having the Two-Weapon Fighting feat when wielding a vardatch and butterfly sword even if she does not meet the prerequisites for that feat.

  • Kiai Smite (Ex): Once per day, a voják of 3rd level or higher can give a great cry during combat that invigorates her. When a voják shouts (a free action), her next attack gains a bonus on the attack roll and the damage roll (if any) equal to her Charisma bonus (minimum 1). As a voják gains levels, she can make a kiai smite more often.

  • Iaijutsu Master (Ex): By 5th level, a voják has become adept at iaijutsu, a fighting technique that concentrates on drawing her weapons and striking a foe in one fluid motion. She is treated as having the Quick Draw feat, but only when she draws her vardatch or butterfly sword.

  • Staredown (Ex): At 6th level, a voják becomes able to strike fear into her foes by her mere presence. She gains a +4 bonus on Intimidate checks and can demoralize an opponent as described in the Intimidate skill description in the Player's Handbook.

  • Improved Initiative (Ex): At 8th level, the voják has practiced iaijutsu techniques used in ritual duels between two voják, and she is able to anticipate when any enemy will attack. She now has the Improved Initiative feat.

  • Mass Staredown (Ex): At 10th level, a voják has sufficient presence that she can cow multiple foes. Using an Intimidate check, a voják can demoralize all opponents within 30 feet with a single standard action.

  • Improved Two Swords as One (Ex): At 11th level, a voják's prowess with the vardatch and butterfly sword improves. She is treated as having the Improved Two-Weapon Fighting feat when wielding a vardatch and butterfly sword, even if she does not meet the prerequisites for the feat.

  • Improved Staredown (Ex): At 14th level, even a glance from the hard eyes of a voják is enough to give her foes pause. The voják can demoralize opponents within 30 feet as a move action, not a standard action.

  • Greater Two Swords as One (Ex): At 16th level, fighting with a vardatch and butterfly sword becomes second nature for a voják. She is treated as having the Greater Two-Weapon Fighting feat when wielding a vardatch and a butterfly sword, even if she does not meet the prerequisites for the feat.

  • Frightful Presence (Ex): A 20th-level voják's bravery, honor, and fighting prowess have become legendary. When the voják draws her blade, opponents within 30 feet must succeed on a Will save (DC 20 + voják's Charisma modifier) or become panicked for 4d6 rounds (if they have 4 or fewer Hit Dice), or shaken for 4d6 rounds (if they have from 5 to 19 Hit Dice). Creatures with 20 or more Hit Dice are not affected. Any foe that successfully resists the effect cannot be affected again by the same voják's frightful presence for 24 hours.

Voják

Level
Special
1st
Daisho proficiency
2nd
Two swords as one
3rd
Kiai smite 1/day
4th
-
5th
Iaijustu master
6th
Staredown
7th
Kiai smite 2/day
8th
Improved Initiative
9th
-
10th
Mass staredown
11th
Improved two swords as one
12th
Kiai smite 3/day
13th
-
14th
Improved staredown
15th
-
16th
Greater two swords as one
17th
Kiai smite 4/day
18th
-
19th
-
20th
Frightful presence

Ex-Voják: A voják must be of lawful alignment and dishonors herself if she ever willingly commits a chaotic act or violates the core principles of the voják code which are honor, loyalty, and courage. A voják who becomes nonlawful or violates the tenets of the voják code cannot gain new levels as a voják and loses all voják class features that depend on Charisma or Charisma-based checks. Minor embarrassments don't count, but major breaks with the code do. Acts that could lose a voják her status include disobeying an order from a superior officer or hive queen, fleeing in cowardice from an important battle, being caught in a major lie or other breach of integrity, and appallingly rude behavior. She can regain her class features and the ability to progress in the class if she atones for her violations (see the atonement spell in the Player's Handbook) assuming the hive queen they serve offers a chance at redemption. Some disgraced voják take levels in the ronin prestige class.

Home     Base Classes

Campaign Design - Base Classes: Swashbuckler

Swashbuckler
(from Complete Warrior)

The swashbuckler embodies the halfling concepts of daring and panache. Favoring agility over brute force, the swashbuckler excels both in combat situations and social interactions, making her a versatile character whether serving on a halfling pirate vessel or working for one of the many halfling merchant houses.

Abilities: The lightly armored swashbuckler depends on a high Dexterity for her Armor Class, as well as for many class skills. High intelligence and Charisma are also hallmarks of a successful swashbuckler. Strength is not as important for a swashbuckler as it is for other melee combatants.
Race: Halfling.
Alignment: Any.
Hit Die: d10.
Luck Die: (d4 + 1).

Class Skills
  • Skill List: The swashbuckler's class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Craft: Any (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Jump (Str), Profession: Any (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Swim (Str), Tumble (Dex), and Use Rope (Dex).
  • Note: Because the Three Worlds campaign uses the Skills by Character house rule, the list of class skills given here is only included for the sake of completeness, and is not used by characters in the campaign setting.
  • Skill Points at 1st Level: (4 + Intelligence modifier) x4.
  • Skill Points at Each Additional Class Level: 4 + Intelligence modifier.

Class Features
All of the following are class features of the swashbuckler:
  • Base Attack Bonus: Good. A swashbuckler gains +1 base attack bonus per class level.

  • Fortitude Base Save Bonus: Good. A swashbuckler gains a +2½ base Fortitude save bonus at first level, and an additional +½ base Fortitude save bonus per class level.

  • Reflex Base Save Bonus: Poor. A swashbuckler gains +13 base Reflex save bonus per class level.

  • Will Base Save Bonus: Poor. A swashbuckler gains +13 base Will save bonus per class level.

  • Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Swashbucklers are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, and with light armor.

  • Weapon Finesse (Ex): A swashbuckler gains Weapon Finesse as a bonus feat at 1st level, even if she does not qualify for the feat.

  • Grace (Ex): A swashbuckler gains a +1 competence bonus on reflex saves at 2nd level. This bonus increases to +2 at 11th level, and to +3 at 20th level. A swashbuckler loses this bonus when wearing medium or heavy armor or when carrying medium or heavy load.

  • Insightful Strike (Ex): At 3rd level, a swashbuckler becomes able to place her finesse attacks where they deal greater damage. She applies her Intelligence bonus (if any) as a bonus on damage rolls (in addition to any Strength bonus she may have) with any light weapon, as well as any other weapon that she could use with Weapon Finesse, such as a rapier, whip, or spiked chain. Targets immune to sneak attacks or critical hits are immune to the swashbuckler's insightful strike. A swashbuckler cannot use this ability when wearing medium or heavy armor or when carrying medium or heavy load.

  • Dodge Bonus (Ex): A swashbuckler is trained at focusing her defenses on a single opponent in melee. During her action, she may designate an opponent and receive a +1 dodge bonus to Armor Class against melee attacks from that opponent. She can select a new opponent on any action. This bonus increases by +1 for every five levels after 5th (+2 at 10th level, +3 at 15th level, and +4 at 20th). A swashbuckler loses this bonus when wearing medium or heavy armor or when carrying medium or heavy load. If the swashbuckler also has the Dodge feat, this bonus stacks with the bonus granted by the feat.

  • Acrobatic Charge (Ex): A swashbuckler of 7th level or higher can charge in situations where others cannot. She may charge over difficult terrain that normally slows movement or allies blocking her path. This ability enables her to run down steep stairs, leap down from the balcony, or to tumble over tables to get to her target. Depending on the circumstance, she may still need to make appropriate checks (Jump or Tumble checks, in particular) to successfully move over the terrain.

  • Improved Flanking (Ex): A swashbuckler of 8th level or higher who is flanking an opponent gains a +4 bonus on attacks instead of a +2 bonus on attacks. (Other characters flanking with the swashbuckler do not gain this increased bonus).

  • Lucky (Ex): Many swashbucklers live by the credo “Better lucky than good”. Once per day, a swashbuckler of 11th level or higher may reroll any failed attack roll, skill check, ability check, or saving throw. The character must take the result of the reroll, even if it is worse than the original roll.

  • Acrobatic Skill Mastery (Ex): At 13th level, a swashbuckler becomes so certain in the use of her acrobatic skills that she can use them reliably even under adverse conditions. When making a Balance, Jump, or Tumble check, a swashbuckler may take 10 even if stress and distractions would normally prevent her from doing so.

  • Weakening Critical (Ex): A swashbuckler of 14th level or higher who scores a critical hit against a creature also deals 2 points of Strength damage to the creature. Creatures immune to critical hits are immune to this effect.

  • Slippery Mind (Ex): When a swashbuckler reaches 17th level, her mind becomes more difficult to control. If the swashbuckler fails her save against an enchantment spell or effect, she can attempt the save again 1 round later at the same DC (assuming she is still alive). She gets only one extra chance to succeed at a certain saving throw.

  • Wounding Critical (Ex): A swashbuckler of 19th level or higher who scores a critical hit against a creature also deals two points of Constitution damage to the creature. (This damage is in addition to the Strength damage dealt by the swashbuckler's weakening critical class feature). Creatures immune to critical hits are immune to the effect.
Swashbuckler
LevelSpecial
1st
Weapon Finesse
2nd
Grace +1
3rd
Insightful strike
4th
-
5th
Dodge bonus +1
6th
-
7th
Acrobatic charge
8th
Improved flanking
9th
-
10th
Dodge bonus +2
11th
Grace +2, lucky
12th
-
13th
Acrobatic skill mastery
14th
Weakening critical
15th
Dodge bonus +3
16th
-
17th
Slippery mind
18th
-
19th
Wounding critical
20th
Dodge bonus +4, grace +3

Home     Base Classes

Campaign Design - Table Rules for the Three Worlds Campaign

Table Rules: I don’t really consider these to be house rules per se, rather they are interpretations and practices I use (mostly to make things like combat flow better). I want to avoid having the sessions bog down, and make resolution of combat and other similar mechanical elements hop along. These are in no particular order of importance, and have no greater organization scheme than “in the order I remembered them to write down”:
  • Initiative: In the case of a tie when rolling for initiative, the first tie breaker will be the total initiative bonus of the two tied individuals (i.e. the combatant with the higher total initiative bonus acts first). If this does not resolve the tie, the combatant with the higher Dexterity bonus will act first. If this does not resolve the tie, the combatant with the higher Dexterity score will act first. Finally, if there is still a tie, then a dice-off (using an unmodified d20 roll) will be used.

  • Natural 20/Natural 1: A natural 20 is not an automatic hit or save; and a natural 1 is not an automatic failure or miss. A natural 20 is treated as a base result of 30 for the purpose of attack rolls and saving throws. A natural 1 is treated as a based result of -10 for the purpose of attack rolls and saving throws. Resolve the attack or saving throw normally using these results.

  • Open Book Policy: During the game, if your character is going to cast a spell, use a non-standard combat maneuver (such as disarm, sunder, trip, or so on), use one of your class abilities, or something similar, please have the rules concerning your character’s action on hand and ready to go. Flipping to the appropriate page while other players are resolving their actions before it gets to your turn in the initiative order will do a lot to speed up play.

  • Pacing: Everyone will be given a reasonable amount of time to decide what they are going to do. I don’t expect you to be able to make snap decisions as quickly as your characters would, but a combat round (for example) is only six seconds long, so no one should really be mulling over their options for an extended period of time. If someone seems to be taking overly long to make up their mind (I’m generally pretty forgiving on this), I’ll give a warning. If they are still unable to decide what they want to do, that character will take the delay action until they can make up their mind and I’ll move on through the initiative order until they do.

  • Ongoing Effects: If you put into play something that has an ongoing effect (such as casting a bless spell, using the bardic inspire courage ability, and so on), please have a note-card or other marker available to put out to remind everyone that it is in play. If you use a buffing spell (such as bulls’ strength, cat’s grace, righteous might, and so on) or similar ability please figure out the modified bonuses of the target at the time the modifiers initially come into effect and write them down (so they don’t have to be recalculated multiple times).

  • Summoned Creatures, part I: If you summon a creature, using any of the various summoning spells, you must have its statistics on hand, detailed and ready to use. So, for example, if you want to use summon monster I to summon a celestial dog, you must have, pre-prepared and on hand, the statistics for a celestial dog.

  • Summoned Creatures, part II: While the list given for each summon monster spell attaches certain templates to certain creatures (i.e. celestial badger, fiendish dire rat, and so on), I allow mixing and matching of creatures and templates. Thus, for example, you could summon a fiendish monkey, or a celestial raven if you wanted even though that would normally be the “wrong” template for those creatures.

  • Summoned Creatures, part III: There are eleven templates for summoned creatures: anarchic, aquan, auran, axiomatic, celestial, fiendish, fioð, ice, ignan, shadow, and terran. When a wizard or a sorcerer acquires a summon monster spell, they may choose two different templates. Their summoned monsters must use one of those two templates. If a wizard or sorcerer wishes to summon additional types of creatures, they must either select the spell again (for a sorcerer), or scribe a new copy into their spellbook (for a wizard). They may then select another template, and can now summon three different types of creatures using summon monster spells. Other than total spell slots (for sorcerers) and money, time, and spell book pages (for wizards), there is no limit to the number of different templates an arcane caster may be able to summon. Clerics and favored souls summon creatures depending upon their chosen Lord of Heaven or Lord of Hell. The specifics for summoning as it is related to each Lord of Heaven or Hell are given in their descriptions.

  • Ammunition: Ammunition (arrows, bolts, sling bullets) is destroyed when used, whether it hits or not (to simplify bookkeeping). Ammunition made from special materials (such as adamantine, silver, and so forth) may be salvaged for the raw materials, but is useless as ammunition after it is used. Magical ammunition may be recovered using the standard rules fo ammunition recovery.

  • Damage Reduction: In 3.5e, the rules don’t differentiate between different levels of magical damage reduction, listing it merely as DR/magic. This means that a +1 weapon is just as effective against creatures with DR/magic as a +5 weapon. However, I use varying levels of DR/magic, so you may run into creatures that have DR/magic +1, or creatures that have DR/magic +3 and so on. Note that you may also find creatures with the standard substance sensitive type of DR as well (i.e. DR/silver, DR/adamantine, and so forth).

  • Sundering Magical Weapons: In addition to the increased hardness and hit points weapons gain as a result of being magically enhanced, a magical weapon can only be sundered by a weapon with an equal or higher enhancement bonus than itself. Therefore, a +3 weapon could only be sundered by another +3 weapon, or a weapon with a greater magical enhancement. These benefits do not apply to weapons that have gained a temporary enhancement bonus as a result of the magic weapon or greater magic weapon spells.

  • Monsters: The details of monsters in the various books serve as a starting point for me, and are not set in stone. I interpret the statistics given in the books to represent the average creature of a given type. For intelligent creatures especially, I will likely vary the feats, skills, ability scores, equipment and so on from the basic information given in the books. Don't be surprised to find a goblin with Point Blank Shot rather than Skill Augmentation (Listen and Spot), or a bugbear with Power Attack and chain mail.

  • Scribing Wizard Spell Books: The core rulebooks contain contradictory information concerning the cost to scribe spells into a wizard’s spell book. I rule that it costs 25 shillings per page to scribe a spell into a spell book. The two spells a wizard may put in his spell book each time he goes up in level do not cost anything.

  • Searching: To give some shorthand language terminology for searching rooms or other areas, and avoid lots of die rolls and confusion, I’d like to do this. If you want to quickly search a room, tell me you want to “poke around”, that means you are going to Take 10 on your Search check in every searchable area of the room. If you tell me you want to do a “thorough search of the room” (or something similar), that means you are going to Take 20 on your Search check in every searchable area of the room. If you want to search something specific, we’ll handle that as it comes.

  • Opposition Fatalities: Just as with Player Characters, Non-Player Characters (friendly, hostile, and indifferent) all benefit from the “disabled, dying, dead” rules, meaning that even when you drop an enemy, he may not be dead, just wounded and unconscious. This probably won’t matter very often – I will assume that, in most cases, fallen foes will either expire from their wounds, or you will “mop up” any survivors unless you tell me otherwise. But, it does mean that foes that do not die right away could be healed on the spot, moved out of harm’s way, or otherwise return to fight another day.

  • Forgot Something? If you mistakenly forget to add in a modifier to one of your rolls or actions and don’t figure it out until later, generally it will simply be treated as a “self-inflicted penalty” and we won’t go back to correct the mistake. It is usually too clumsy and cumbersome to try to go back and “fix” things that happened a couple of actions previous, let alone a round or two in the past. There may be exceptions to this rule depending on mitigating circumstances, but I’d like to keep “reruns” to a minimum.

  • Invisibility and Flanking: If you are invisible, completely hidden from view (such as when you are within an area of total darkness), or otherwise undetectable by an enemy, you cannot provide an ally with a flanking bonus. The exception to this rule occurs if you actively make a melee attack while invisible, hidden, or undetectable, then you may provide a flanking bonus against the creature you attacked to an ally for the round following your attack.

  • Leadership: Subject to my approval, characters may take the Leadership feat multiple times, and gain additional cohorts and followers.

  • Cohorts: Cohorts may be members of any standard class, and any standard race. If you desire a cohort with an ECL (who may be added under the same conditions as a player could bring in a new character from a race with an ECL), the cohort must be eligible to enter play at least twice as high in level as his ECL (i.e. if you want a cohort from a race with an ECL of +2, your Leadership score must be no lower than 6). Cohorts may multiclass and take prestige classes just as PCs may. As elite individuals, their statistics are generated using 4d6, six times, arrange to taste. A cohort is equipped with gear appropriate to his level when recruited (as set out in the Dungeon Master’s Guide on page 127). You may build your preferred cohort, subject to my approval, who will be introduced to play when it makes sense for them to show up. Once the cohort comes into play, he or she will be an NPC acting under your control for the most part, but if I think I should (for whatever reason), I may take control of the cohort and run him or her directly.

  • Followers: Followers are much more limited than cohorts. Followers may be commoners, experts, or warriors, (and, in rare cases, with my approval, adepts) and usually of the same race and alignment as their leader (there may be exceptions this rule, when appropriate, although followers must always be a member of one of the standard races found in the campaign). Their statistics are generated using the following method: 3d6, six times, in order. A follower is equipped with gear appropriate to his level when recruited (as set out in the Dungeon Master’s Guide on page 127). You are responsible for generating the statistics of your followers, subject to my review and approval: if you don’t make them, they won’t show up. Once you have put together your followers, give their character statistics to me, and I’ll introduce them to the campaign when appropriate. Alternatively, you may try to recruit NPCs you meet as followers. Once a follower has been inserted into the campaign, he will be an NPC under your control, though, as with cohorts, I reserve the right to take control of these NPCs whenever I think I should and run them directly.

  • Flanking: The standard rule set requires that each pair of allies act independently to flank an opponent. Instead, I use a “flanked by one, flanked by all” rule. While a combatant is flanked by a pair of opponents, any other attacker who makes a melee attack against that combatant gains the benefits of flanking with respect to his attacks. As a side note, only individuals involved in melee combat with an opponent can gain a flanking bonus, or help an ally gain a flanking bonus.

  • Charging: You may charge through a space occupied by an ally provided that ally chooses to allow you to pass unhindered.

  • Lances: Effectively, a heavy lance, and a longspear are the same weapon. If you use a longspear while mounted, I will treat it as a heavy lance for all purposes related to its combat statistics. Similarly, if you use a heavy lance on foot, I will treat it as a longspear. The same rule holds true for the light lance and the halfspear.

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